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AA loading - suggestion for Kodak

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Anonymous
April 29, 2005 12:37:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I know you guys are moving away from AAs, but
on chance should you decide to design a new
camera with them, please consider 'side' loading
the cells. Let the camera body take the
compression. These 'end' hold light weight doors
that compress the cells break way to easy.
If it were not for ebay how much would I have
spent fixing my unit? $100 per break?

I was looking at your cx7530 but see it has the same
problem/door as my 3mp unit.
Anonymous
April 29, 2005 6:45:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Greetings VB,

I can appreciate your concerns and the suggestion. I am taking the action of
moving your comments on to our concept team who want to know of your
interests. I am not sure of the reason for the bottom loading battery
configuration, but I suspect there is a valid reason? If I can learn more
about this while sharing your thoughts, I will return with it.

Thanks for posting this,

Ron Baird
Eastman Kodak Company






<vbhelpski@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1114789023.611621.280340@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> I know you guys are moving away from AAs, but
> on chance should you decide to design a new
> camera with them, please consider 'side' loading
> the cells. Let the camera body take the
> compression. These 'end' hold light weight doors
> that compress the cells break way to easy.
> If it were not for ebay how much would I have
> spent fixing my unit? $100 per break?
>
> I was looking at your cx7530 but see it has the same
> problem/door as my 3mp unit.
>
Anonymous
April 29, 2005 7:11:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

vbhelpski@yahoo.com wrote:
> I know you guys are moving away from AAs, but
> on chance should you decide to design a new
> camera with them, please consider 'side' loading
> the cells. Let the camera body take the
> compression. These 'end' hold light weight doors
> that compress the cells break way to easy.
> If it were not for ebay how much would I have
> spent fixing my unit? $100 per break?
>
> I was looking at your cx7530 but see it has the same
> problem/door as my 3mp unit.
>
I believe that Kodak sells the doors for some models, and that
installation isn't too difficult. Still, I am VERY careful about
opening and closing the doors on mine.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Related resources
Anonymous
April 29, 2005 7:20:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 14:45:20 -0400, Ronald Baird wrote:

> I am not sure of the reason for the bottom loading battery
> configuration, but I suspect there is a valid reason? If I can learn
> more about this while sharing your thoughts, I will return with it.

There may be valid reasons, but vbhelpski probably wouldn't have
asked for a different "side loading" design if the current bottom
loading design didn't have parts break so often. For quite some
time people here have been reporting similar breakage problems
(you've seen many or all of them) and as far as I can tell they only
happen with Kodak cameras. All of my cameras have had bottom
loading batteries and I've had no similar problems nor have I heard
complaints from other people using the same cameras. Kodak really
should have addressed this problem long before this. Or if they
have, they should have made you aware of what has been done to
correct it. Kodak doesn't need a reputation that will only be
overcome by introducing a "5 year, 50,000 mile" warranty.
Anonymous
April 30, 2005 1:38:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <1114789023.611621.280340@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
vbhelpski@yahoo.com wrote:

> I know you guys are moving away from AAs, but
> on chance should you decide to design a new
> camera with them, please consider 'side' loading
> the cells. Let the camera body take the
> compression. These 'end' hold light weight doors
> that compress the cells break way to easy.
> If it were not for ebay how much would I have
> spent fixing my unit? $100 per break?
>
> I was looking at your cx7530 but see it has the same
> problem/door as my 3mp unit.

That is an unfortunate problem, but AAs are way too big for many
ultra-compact digitals and square Lithium batteries are the way forward
- all we really need are extra add-ons at the POS - say <Buy two
batteries and we'll give you a discount on the 2nd> or <Upgrade to a
larger capacity media and we'll give a discount> - I'm sure this would
be very popular with merchants, would inspire more people to upgrade
easily and make digitals truly Plug and Play.
Anonymous
April 30, 2005 1:38:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Stewy wrote:
> In article <1114789023.611621.280340@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
> vbhelpski@yahoo.com wrote:
>
>
>>I know you guys are moving away from AAs, but
>>on chance should you decide to design a new
>>camera with them, please consider 'side' loading
>>the cells. Let the camera body take the
>>compression. These 'end' hold light weight doors
>>that compress the cells break way to easy.
>>If it were not for ebay how much would I have
>>spent fixing my unit? $100 per break?
>>
>>I was looking at your cx7530 but see it has the same
>>problem/door as my 3mp unit.
>
>
> That is an unfortunate problem, but AAs are way too big for many
> ultra-compact digitals and square Lithium batteries are the way forward
> - all we really need are extra add-ons at the POS - say <Buy two
> batteries and we'll give you a discount on the 2nd> or <Upgrade to a
> larger capacity media and we'll give a discount> - I'm sure this would
> be very popular with merchants, would inspire more people to upgrade
> easily and make digitals truly Plug and Play.

Very often if you buy the camera, and tell them you want a spare
battery, but are going to buy it on the internet because it is cheaper,
they will match the price. Just depends on the dealer.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
April 30, 2005 1:38:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Stewy <anyone4tennis@hotmail.com> wrote:

>That is an unfortunate problem, but AAs are way too big for many
>ultra-compact digitals and square Lithium batteries are the way forward

I agree on the lithium batts being the way of the future but I wish
they would settle on a couple or three standard sizes so there would
be battery portablilty across camera manufacturers.

Wes

--
Reply to:
Whiskey Echo Sierra Sierra AT Alpha Charlie Echo Golf Romeo Oscar Paul dot Charlie Charlie
Lycos address is a spam trap.
Anonymous
May 1, 2005 7:24:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I hope AAs will always be an option.

clutch@lycos.com wrote:
> Stewy <anyone4tennis@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> >That is an unfortunate problem, but AAs are way too big for many
> >ultra-compact digitals and square Lithium batteries are the way
forward
>
> I agree on the lithium batts being the way of the future but I wish
> they would settle on a couple or three standard sizes so there would
> be battery portablilty across camera manufacturers.
>
> Wes
>
> --
> Reply to:
> Whiskey Echo Sierra Sierra AT Alpha Charlie Echo Golf Romeo Oscar
Paul dot Charlie Charlie
> Lycos address is a spam trap.
Anonymous
May 4, 2005 6:59:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <Cxwce.26487$Ow2.11074@fe06.lga>, rphunter@charter.net
says...
> >
> I believe that Kodak sells the doors for some models, and that
> installation isn't too difficult. Still, I am VERY careful about
> opening and closing the doors on mine.
>

--
Probably a VERY common problem for most camera brands. Just replaced
the AA battery door on my wife's Olympus D520. The Olympus website
sells a LOT of different battery doors. $7 plus $3 shipping for mine.
The plastic door just slides off the metal hinged contact piece, and the
new one slides right on. Took me about 2 minutes to change the door -
took longer than that to open the shipping packaging.
--

Jerry Maple
General Dynamics C4 Systems
Scottsdale, AZ
--
Anonymous
May 5, 2005 1:22:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hi Matt,

Thanks for the additional feedback, it helps. I will make it a point to get
this to our engineers.

Talk to you soon,

Ron Baird
Eastman Kodak Company


> >Greetings VB,
> >
> >I can appreciate your concerns and the suggestion. I am taking the action
of
> >moving your comments on to our concept team who want to know of your
> >interests. I am not sure of the reason for the bottom loading battery
> >configuration, but I suspect there is a valid reason? If I can learn
more
> >about this while sharing your thoughts, I will return with it.
> >
> >Thanks for posting this,
> >
> >Ron Baird
> >Eastman Kodak Company
>
> There are 3 Main problems with the "double barrelled" loading
> method...
>
> 1. Breakage of the door (unusable) - I've seen sideloader doors break,
> but it's not the same kind of disaster.
>
Anonymous
May 9, 2005 3:07:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

> Despite the issues, I'd vote for AA'a every time - the ability to
> maintan a "float" of AA NiMH that can be used with any suitable
> equipment, means I have a gadget-bag of power that doesn't cost a
> fortune.

I used to agree running my Fujifilm F40i on AAs, but over time, and
successive models, I've realized that with the significant improvement
in battery runtimes in the latest models (eg. 500 shots with the
Fujifilm F10; 300+ with the Sony P200; several hours of viewing time
with both of them), there really isn't any point in carrying pockets
full of heavy AAs -- one extra LiIon slim, cell phone battery sized pack
will let you take hundreds, if not thousands of photos, and let you run
for well over 6+ hours straight w/o stopping (spare + main battery).

(And if you're really taking that many photos in a day, god bless
your shutter finger!)

---

Still, for those AA/AAA devices I have (CD, etc), the Rayovac 15
minute charger is the 'best' that I've found -- can't find any other
charger that'll do it faster, works great (the 2 AA flip-out AC adapter
all-in-one model), and I don't have to wait dozens of minutes if I do
need to grab & run. (even a minute or two of charging gets me enough
charge in those batteries to make them useful; a few minutes more, the
time it takes to get ready to run out the door in a flash, and you've
got enough charge to go through a roll or two equivalent of photos and such)

---

Costco for anyone else - AA Alkaline multi-packs cheap, and you can
easily load up a trunk load for a few dozen dollars and go for years and
years on them before having to buy more.

---

Now, if someone can stick a solar panel on one of these digicams so
we can self-charge out in the woods, ....
Anonymous
May 9, 2005 4:32:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

David Chien <chiendh@uci.edu> writes:
> I used to agree running my Fujifilm F40i on AAs, but over time, and
> successive models, I've realized that with the significant improvement
> in battery runtimes in the latest models (eg. 500 shots with the
> Fujifilm F10; 300+ with the Sony P200; several hours of viewing time
> with both of them)

That means the cameras are using less power than before

> there really isn't any point in carrying pockets full of heavy AAs
> -- one extra LiIon slim, cell phone battery sized
> pack will let you take hundreds, if not thousands of photos,

But in that case a spare set of AA's will let you do the same.

> and let you run for well over 6+ hours straight w/o stopping (spare
> + main battery). (And if you're really taking that many photos in a
> day, god bless your shutter finger!)

But maybe you want to shoot more than 1 day, e.g. maybe you want to go
on a 3 week trip. The li ion charger and spare packs that don't fit
anything but the digicam are an unnecessary nuisance. I'm pretty sure
that if I buy another compact digicam, I'll choose one that uses AA's.
They even run a reasonable amount of time on alkalines these days.
I'm not a high-volume shooter and so a set of alkalines would probably
last for weeks. That would let me travel with no charger at all; just
take a charged set of NiMH in the camera and maybe a spare set, and if
necessary, buy alkalines during the trip.
Anonymous
May 9, 2005 6:37:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Mon, 09 May 2005 11:07:19 -0700, David Chien wrote:

> Now, if someone can stick a solar panel on one of these digicams so
> we can self-charge out in the woods, ....

Or put a little dynamo in them, as Sony has in one of their small
radios. Crank it for 30 seconds and take another 5 shots. Or crank
it for 5 minutes and take no more shots until you get your strength
and steadiness back. :) 
Anonymous
May 9, 2005 6:48:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

ASAAR wrote:
> On Mon, 09 May 2005 11:07:19 -0700, David Chien wrote:
>
>
>> Now, if someone can stick a solar panel on one of these digicams so
>>we can self-charge out in the woods, ....
>
>
> Or put a little dynamo in them, as Sony has in one of their small
> radios. Crank it for 30 seconds and take another 5 shots. Or crank
> it for 5 minutes and take no more shots until you get your strength
> and steadiness back. :) 
>
Maybe a multipurpose dynamo charger.... Hummmm.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
May 9, 2005 11:13:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Mon, 09 May 2005 14:48:22 -0500, Ron Hunter wrote:

>> Or put a little dynamo in them, as Sony has in one of their small
>> radios. Crank it for 30 seconds and take another 5 shots. Or crank
>> it for 5 minutes and take no more shots until you get your strength
>> and steadiness back. :) 
>>
> Maybe a multipurpose dynamo charger.... Hummmm.

Not a good idea. Not at all! I've found out the hard way. You
have no idea how difficult it would be to fully charge a pair of
high capacity NiMH AA cells. The radios I've tried had built-in
NiCads, probably not much more than 600 mAh, and I never came close
to fully charging them. It's quite tiring, moreso for the hand
holding the radio than the hand doing the cranking. A dynamo would
be handy for emergency use in a camera that will only take a small
number of shots, but probably would be impractical if they used the
flash. And it would greatly increase the size of the camera. Even
if you don't consider the dynamo, Sony's radio is of surprisingly
high quality, unlike the other examples I've seen, including
Grundig, among others. Rugged case, good tone for its size,
accurate vernier tuning, good selectivity, and most important - you
can switch between the embedded NiCads and a pair of alkaline AAs.
Anonymous
May 9, 2005 11:13:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

ASAAR wrote:
> On Mon, 09 May 2005 14:48:22 -0500, Ron Hunter wrote:
>
>
>>> Or put a little dynamo in them, as Sony has in one of their small
>>>radios. Crank it for 30 seconds and take another 5 shots. Or crank
>>>it for 5 minutes and take no more shots until you get your strength
>>>and steadiness back. :) 
>>>
>>
>>Maybe a multipurpose dynamo charger.... Hummmm.
>
>
> Not a good idea. Not at all! I've found out the hard way. You
> have no idea how difficult it would be to fully charge a pair of
> high capacity NiMH AA cells. The radios I've tried had built-in
> NiCads, probably not much more than 600 mAh, and I never came close
> to fully charging them. It's quite tiring, moreso for the hand
> holding the radio than the hand doing the cranking. A dynamo would
> be handy for emergency use in a camera that will only take a small
> number of shots, but probably would be impractical if they used the
> flash. And it would greatly increase the size of the camera. Even
> if you don't consider the dynamo, Sony's radio is of surprisingly
> high quality, unlike the other examples I've seen, including
> Grundig, among others. Rugged case, good tone for its size,
> accurate vernier tuning, good selectivity, and most important - you
> can switch between the embedded NiCads and a pair of alkaline AAs.
>
I have a dynamo operated radio, and a flashlight that works on the same
principle within arms reach right now. I consider both of them useful
emergency equipment. Yes, it is a bit of a pain to keep them running,
but it DOES work. I really don't need to use the radio for listing to
music, but it sounds pretty good on FM. The flashlight gets laughs
every time I use it, but it works, provides useful light, and will keep
working as long as I can continue to move my arm...


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
!