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Power 560ti by 2x 2 molex to pci-e converter save?

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March 7, 2012 2:19:38 PM

Hi guys,

So i have a 3 year old dell, and i'm going to upgrade my videocart.
Im thinking of the MSI 560-ti , but it requires 2 pci-e connectors.
My Power Supply has 0 pci-e, but alot of molex 4-pins
I know there are 2 molex 4-pin to 1 pci-e cables out there, but is it save to use 2 of them to power my 560-ti?

Info:
560-ti uses 350W in load. (it uses as much power as a regular mid-class video cart)
1 molex 4 pin max. voltage is 12V
So 2 molex 4 pin = 24V for one PCI-e

Is it save to use 2 converters?

Thanks!!
March 7, 2012 3:48:48 PM

I would not recommend trying this at all. Most Dells come with a power supply that's only 300W-400W to begin with. It doesn't have any PCIe cables for a reason: It was not designed to power anything than would require them. They do make video cards specifically designed with low power consumption in mind (e.g. HD 4670 and successors), but they are not going to be the best for high-powered gaming.
a c 243 ) Power supply
March 7, 2012 3:58:05 PM

Smurf9852 said:
Hi guys,

So i have a 3 year old dell, and i'm going to upgrade my videocart.
Im thinking of the MSI 560-ti , but it requires 2 pci-e connectors.
My Power Supply has 0 pci-e, but alot of molex 4-pins
I know there are 2 molex 4-pin to 1 pci-e cables out there, but is it save to use 2 of them to power my 560-ti?

Info:
560-ti uses 350W in load. (it uses as much power as a regular mid-class video cart)
1 molex 4 pin max. voltage is 12V
So 2 molex 4 pin = 24V for one PCI-e

Is it save to use 2 converters?

Thanks!!

Dell started using less and less molex connectors on thier systems 6-7 years ago.
Chances of a 3 year old Dell psu having more than 1 Molex connector are extremely slim.
Lack of a pcie connector suggests a 300 watt psu, not a chance of you using it with a GTX560Ti
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a b ) Power supply
March 7, 2012 4:18:39 PM

Yep, your gonna either need to get a different Extremely low end Video card, or just plain out get another Power Supply and the GTX 560 ti
March 9, 2012 2:57:04 PM

What about power supply's like the Corsair Builder CX430 V2??.
It has 1 PCI-e connector, but as known alot of videocarts require 2.
I have heard that much videocarts come with a 2x Molex to 1x PCI-e convert cable.
So this will work just fine?; using the PCI-e connector and the convert cable?
March 9, 2012 3:06:12 PM

I have used a Molex to PCI-e power adapter on several different systems over the past couple of years in reviewing PC hardware, but I always made sure the PSU could handle the system. If you are sure, I mean really sure, the PSU can handle all the wattage of the system with the new PSU you should have no problems. But you need to make sure that PSU is capable of handling the wattage you are going to be using.

It would actually be safer and better in the long run to buy a very good PSU instead of the more often than not garbage that is put into prebuilt systems. A good PSU is worth its weight in silver at least, if your going to spend the money on a decent video card at least do yourself the favor of giving it a good PSU to run on.
March 9, 2012 3:17:46 PM

Smurf9852 said:
What about power supply's like the Corsair Builder CX430 V2??.
It has 1 PCI-e connector, but as known alot of videocarts require 2.
I have heard that much videocarts come with a 2x Molex to 1x PCI-e convert cable.
So this will work just fine?; using the PCI-e connector and the convert cable?


If you have a video card that needs two PCIe plugs, get a PSU with two PCIe plugs. The power supply is not a good place to try and save $15 by cutting corners. You can wreck your whole system.

In my experience, doing what you're talking about doing (buying a PSU with little margin for error and then using converters to fake an extra PCIe plug) is exactly how you overload a power supply. Since you're buying a new PSU and have the choice of literally anything on the market, do yourself a favor and get one that you're SURE is adequate for the job. Like this one, for example, which comes from a top-tier manufacturer, gives you 600W and costs less than $40 after rebates and promo codes:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

You will not do much better than that.

By the way, before you do ANY of this, since you have a Dell, make sure that 1) A new power supply is going to fit in the case, and 2) The motherboard has standard power connections, not some weird proprietary cables. OEMs like Dell and HP will often use odd-size units and plugs, and motherboards with restricted CPU support lists, specifically to make it difficult for you to upgrade on your own. They want you to buy a new system from them, not components from Newegg.
March 9, 2012 3:19:05 PM

Well, the online calculators always say something under 400W, so i thought 430W would be fine.
Thinking of a Cooler Master GX-Lite 500W now, it has 2x PCIe :) 
Thank you for your reply.

!