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Question about Radeon 6850's

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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October 7, 2011 12:34:56 PM

Chip is identical, clocks are identical, so the power draw should be the same.

What PSU do you have?
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October 7, 2011 12:41:26 PM

4745454b said:
Chip is identical, clocks are identical, so the power draw should be the same.

What PSU do you have?



Unfortunately, I only have a Bestec 350w psu that came with my dell.
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October 7, 2011 1:57:05 PM

Yuck. Unless you are planning on replacing the PSU you can't run a 6850. I think that PSU can do 250-260W. Assuming the normal 95W quad core CPU, this gives you around 100W. A 5770 maybe. Best you can do.
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October 7, 2011 2:04:20 PM

I read in some other forums that people ran 6850's on 350w psu's. Could that be true? The reason I asked is because I'm on a tight budget and I may not be able to afford a new psu. And the Radeon 5770 is not as good as it used to be.
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October 7, 2011 2:15:17 PM

Depends on the 350W PSU. 100W for the CPU, 50W(ish) for the board and rest of system means you are using 150W right there. If your PSU can output 250W, that means you have around 100W for the GPU. I'm going from memory on the output of that PSU, take the side off the case and look for yourself.

Also just because you can doesn't mean you should. Stressing the PSU right up to its limits isn't a good idea. Sure it can handle it today, but what about 1 year later in the heat of summer?
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October 7, 2011 2:23:18 PM

4745454b said:
Depends on the 350W PSU. 100W for the CPU, 50W(ish) for the board and rest of system means you are using 150W right there. If your PSU can output 250W, that means you have around 100W for the GPU. I'm going from memory on the output of that PSU, take the side off the case and look for yourself.

Also just because you can doesn't mean you should. Stressing the PSU right up to its limits isn't a good idea. Sure it can handle it today, but what about 1 year later in the heat of summer?



That makes sense. But what if it works and I only use that psu for 2 months? Could it damage my computer? Sorry for asking so many questions. I just want to make sure. I hope I'm not annoying you :) 
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October 7, 2011 2:24:30 PM

It will depend on the PSU. There is no way to know. Just because mine does/did doesn't mean yours will.
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October 7, 2011 2:35:02 PM

While you can get a 6850 running on a 350W PSU, the question is can your PSU actually put out 350W.

Most computer PSU manufactuerers put "specs" on their systems, but once actually tested they sometimes don't meet those specs, or they only meet them if the PSU is located in a freezer. Without reading an independent review on the PSU it is best to have a PSU that is bigger than you really need rather than relying on "specs" that may have been written down by monkeys. Also realize that as temperature increases PSU performance typically degrades. The best PSUs just loose efficiency, the worst decrease their output power.

So the real question is, do you trust the label?

As for potential outcomes. If it doesn't work you could blow up everything in your computer. Or you could just blow up the PSU. You won't know until you do it :-D

This build uses a 6870 and gets it working on a 350W PSU, but another 350W PSU fails - http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/power-supply-psu-re...
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