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My first bird photo, ever.

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April 30, 2005 1:22:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Okay, I was cooking dinner in my back yard, and I saw this flicker,
so I decided to grab my camera and shoot him.

This is from my Canon EOS 20D with the Tamron 28-200mm at f/5.6,
a manual focus, full manual exposure. I had to correct some purple
fringing; first time I'd seen that, and I guess now I know the problem
with a cheap lens.

http://www.pbase.com/james_of_tucson/image/42743166

More about : bird photo

Anonymous
April 30, 2005 1:22:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

This is from my Canon EOS 20D with the Tamron 28-200mm at f/5.6, a
manual focus, full manual exposure.
===================

Putting a Tamron on the 20D is like putting retreads on a Ferrari.
Anonymous
April 30, 2005 2:01:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Annika1980" <annika1980@aol.com> wrote in message
news:1114866683.888103.134940@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> This is from my Canon EOS 20D with the Tamron 28-200mm at f/5.6, a
> manual focus, full manual exposure.
> ===================
>
> Putting a Tamron on the 20D is like putting retreads on a Ferrari.
>
It is pretty soft. It would be a nice shot if there were more front
lighting.

This may be a good example of why spending a lot on the camera and leaving
little for lenses is a bad idea.
-S
Related resources
Anonymous
April 30, 2005 2:46:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

james wrote:

> Okay, I was cooking dinner in my back yard, and I saw this flicker,
> so I decided to grab my camera and shoot him.
>
> This is from my Canon EOS 20D with the Tamron 28-200mm at f/5.6,
> a manual focus, full manual exposure. I had to correct some purple
> fringing; first time I'd seen that, and I guess now I know the problem
> with a cheap lens.
>
> http://www.pbase.com/james_of_tucson/image/42743166

Nice shot and pretty bird. I haven't seen a bird like that in my neck of
the woods (East coast).


Rita
Anonymous
April 30, 2005 3:00:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

fishbowl@conservatory.com (james) writes:

> This is from my Canon EOS 20D with the Tamron 28-200mm at f/5.6,
> a manual focus, full manual exposure. I had to correct some purple
> fringing; first time I'd seen that, and I guess now I know the problem
> with a cheap lens.
>
> http://www.pbase.com/james_of_tucson/image/42743166

Remarkably small things, most birds. And prone to sitting in shadow;
I've noticed that myself. Not a bad first bird photo!
--
David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:D d-b@dd-b.net>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/&gt;
RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/&gt; <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/&gt;
Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/&gt; <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/&gt;
Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/&gt;
Anonymous
April 30, 2005 3:01:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"SimonLW" <anon@anon.com> writes:

> "Annika1980" <annika1980@aol.com> wrote in message
> news:1114866683.888103.134940@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
>> This is from my Canon EOS 20D with the Tamron 28-200mm at f/5.6, a
>> manual focus, full manual exposure.
>> ===================
>>
>> Putting a Tamron on the 20D is like putting retreads on a Ferrari.
>>
> It is pretty soft. It would be a nice shot if there were more front
> lighting.
>
> This may be a good example of why spending a lot on the camera and
> leaving little for lenses is a bad idea.

It *may* be, but I'd deal with the lighting all being from the back
first. And probably lose the sky to bringing up the midtones a lot, I
guess.

A 28-200 from *anybody* isn't going to be wonderful; I think that's a
more useful point to learn than any particular disregard for Tamron.
Tamron makes some fine lenses. For most of my photographic life, most
of the best zooms were made by people like Tokina and Tamron and *not*
by the body manufacturers.
--
David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:D d-b@dd-b.net>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/&gt;
RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/&gt; <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/&gt;
Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/&gt; <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/&gt;
Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/&gt;
Anonymous
April 30, 2005 4:53:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hi James,

Nice shot. Congratulations.

Best,

Conrad


--
Conrad
Anonymous
April 30, 2005 5:17:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

SimonLW wrote:
> "Annika1980" <annika1980@aol.com> wrote in message
> news:1114866683.888103.134940@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
>
>>This is from my Canon EOS 20D with the Tamron 28-200mm at f/5.6, a
>>manual focus, full manual exposure.
>>===================
>>
>>Putting a Tamron on the 20D is like putting retreads on a Ferrari.
>>
>
> It is pretty soft. It would be a nice shot if there were more front
> lighting.
>
> This may be a good example of why spending a lot on the camera and leaving
> little for lenses is a bad idea.
> -S
>
>
I don't know how one can tell given the greatly reduced size of the
image I saw. Maybe with the full file, I could have a better idea of
the original quality of the shot. As for purple fringing (chromatic
aberration), taking pictures of dark things against a light sky is
pretty much the textbook method for showing it.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
April 30, 2005 5:58:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In message <w7Ice.2640$_K.935@fed1read03>,
fishbowl@conservatory.com (james) wrote:

>Okay, I was cooking dinner in my back yard, and I saw this flicker,
>so I decided to grab my camera and shoot him.
>
>This is from my Canon EOS 20D with the Tamron 28-200mm at f/5.6,
>a manual focus, full manual exposure. I had to correct some purple
>fringing; first time I'd seen that, and I guess now I know the problem
>with a cheap lens.
>
>http://www.pbase.com/james_of_tucson/image/42743166

The term "purple fringing" is kind of ambiguous, as people use it to
refer to both chromatic aberration and sensor blooming, which are two
completely different things. Chromatic aberation in any given lens is
usually less at higher f-stops (smaller apertures). Sensor blooming can
only be addressed at the level of exposure on the sensor. Sensor
blooming is most likely with the camera's lowest ISO setting, but going
to a higher ISO will also increase noise in the dark bird. It is really
hard to shoot birds against the sky, unless the sky is deep blue on a
clear day. Sometimes you need flash fill to get the most of a bird
against a hazy or cloudy sky.
--

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
John P Sheehy <JPS@no.komm>
><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
Anonymous
April 30, 2005 6:07:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In message <1114866683.888103.134940@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
"Annika1980" <annika1980@aol.com> wrote:

>This is from my Canon EOS 20D with the Tamron 28-200mm at f/5.6, a
>manual focus, full manual exposure.
>===================
>
>Putting a Tamron on the 20D is like putting retreads on a Ferrari.

You mean *that* Tamron. Tamron makes some lenses that are optically
superior to their Canon counterparts. Try to narrow your brush a
little. Thanks.
--

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
John P Sheehy <JPS@no.komm>
><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
Anonymous
April 30, 2005 7:24:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In message <11776k37n1pefa5@news.supernews.com>,
"Rita Ä Berkowitz" <ritaberk2O04 @aol.com> wrote:

>Nice shot and pretty bird. I haven't seen a bird like that in my neck of
>the woods (East coast).

I live in NY, and there are Flickers are very common here. They are
often found on the ground, in fields of grass, eating ants. Here's one
I found on the ground in Central Park in Manhattan, last Sunday:

http://www.pbase.com/image/42750838




--

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
John P Sheehy <JPS@no.komm>
><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
Anonymous
April 30, 2005 7:24:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

JPS@no.komm wrote:

> I live in NY, and there are Flickers are very common here. They are
> often found on the ground, in fields of grass, eating ants. Here's
> one I found on the ground in Central Park in Manhattan, last Sunday:
>
> http://www.pbase.com/image/42750838

Now, that is nice!! Thanks.


Rita
Anonymous
April 30, 2005 11:17:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

<JPS@no.komm> wrote in message
news:np67719b89bpvhses70nfe4ksknn5jafdn@4ax.com...
> In message <11776k37n1pefa5@news.supernews.com>,
> "Rita Ä Berkowitz" <ritaberk2O04 @aol.com> wrote:
>
>>Nice shot and pretty bird. I haven't seen a bird like that in my neck of
>>the woods (East coast).
>
> I live in NY, and there are Flickers are very common here. They are
> often found on the ground, in fields of grass, eating ants. Here's one
> I found on the ground in Central Park in Manhattan, last Sunday:
>
> http://www.pbase.com/image/42750838

Nice photo John! I've lived on Long Island for all but one year of my life.
I don't think that I've ever seen one of those birds. I never saw a
hummingbird until last summer.
Anonymous
May 1, 2005 3:35:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

JPS@no.komm wrote:
> In message <11776k37n1pefa5@news.supernews.com>,
> "Rita Ä Berkowitz" <ritaberk2O04 @aol.com> wrote:
>
>> Nice shot and pretty bird. I haven't seen a bird like that in my
>> neck of the woods (East coast).
>
> I live in NY, and there are Flickers are very common here. They are
> often found on the ground, in fields of grass, eating ants. Here's
> one I found on the ground in Central Park in Manhattan, last Sunday:
>
> http://www.pbase.com/image/42750838
>

I need a good Flicker logo for my "FLICKER Photo" business card.

--
Frank ess
Anonymous
May 1, 2005 4:01:58 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In message <6oUce.4410$FE3.3087@fe12.lga>,
"Peter A. Stavrakoglou" <ntotrr@optonline.net> wrote:

><JPS@no.komm> wrote in message
>news:np67719b89bpvhses70nfe4ksknn5jafdn@4ax.com...
>> In message <11776k37n1pefa5@news.supernews.com>,
>> "Rita Ä Berkowitz" <ritaberk2O04 @aol.com> wrote:
>>
>>>Nice shot and pretty bird. I haven't seen a bird like that in my neck of
>>>the woods (East coast).
>>
>> I live in NY, and there are Flickers are very common here. They are
>> often found on the ground, in fields of grass, eating ants. Here's one
>> I found on the ground in Central Park in Manhattan, last Sunday:
>>
>> http://www.pbase.com/image/42750838
>
>Nice photo John! I've lived on Long Island for all but one year of my life.
>I don't think that I've ever seen one of those birds. I never saw a
>hummingbird until last summer.

I never noticed either of those birds until a couple years ago, and I've
lived in the area for 45 years. I probably saw hummingbirds before, but
assumed they were big bees, june bugs, or dragonflies. Flickers you
might hear more than see. They sound like the small monkeys in the
soundtracks of jungle movies. They are in the woodpecker family, but
they don't hammer wood like other woodpeckers do.

Same thing happened with hawks. Before a couple of years ago, I
remember only seeing wild hawks twice in my life. Now, I see hawks
almost every day, sometimes many in a day. I see them perched in
branches along the parkways, soaring in the thermals, flying out of
trees as I approach on foot, and perched on the parapets, fire escapes,
and terraces of apartment buildings in the Bronx when I'm at work. I
have a couple that govern the Aqueduct and power line right-of-way
behind my apartment. I just saw a couple flickers there, today,
courting in the rain.

Yellow Warblers are bright yellow birds, that will invade the area in
the next couple of weeks, court, and build nests. They are so bright
and omnipresent, I don't know how I never noticed them until last
spring.

It seems as if most of us are conditioned to ignore a lot of things, and
birds are one of them. They're just part of the background, unless for
some reason you start to pay attention to them, then they come out of
nowhere.
--

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
John P Sheehy <JPS@no.komm>
><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
Anonymous
May 1, 2005 4:01:59 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sun, 01 May 2005 00:01:58 GMT, JPS@no.komm wrote:

> Same thing happened with hawks. Before a couple of years ago, I
> remember only seeing wild hawks twice in my life. Now, I see hawks
> almost every day, sometimes many in a day. I see them perched in
> branches along the parkways, soaring in the thermals, flying out of
> trees as I approach on foot, and perched on the parapets, fire escapes,
> and terraces of apartment buildings in the Bronx when I'm at work.

Not just birds. Within the last year I've seen a skunk in the
early morning and a big fat raccoon late one evening. Foxes are
occasionally seen, but I haven't as yet.
Anonymous
May 1, 2005 4:02:00 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

ASAAR wrote:
> On Sun, 01 May 2005 00:01:58 GMT, JPS@no.komm wrote:
>
>
>>Same thing happened with hawks. Before a couple of years ago, I
>>remember only seeing wild hawks twice in my life. Now, I see hawks
>>almost every day, sometimes many in a day. I see them perched in
>>branches along the parkways, soaring in the thermals, flying out of
>>trees as I approach on foot, and perched on the parapets, fire escapes,
>>and terraces of apartment buildings in the Bronx when I'm at work.
>
>
> Not just birds. Within the last year I've seen a skunk in the
> early morning and a big fat raccoon late one evening. Foxes are
> occasionally seen, but I haven't as yet.
>
Hawks are quite common here, things like hummingbirds a bit less easy to
catch sight of.
Skunks, coyotes, foxes, raccoon, deer, even an occasional wolf in the
rural areas. LOTS of indigenous wildlife, including all 4 main types of
poisonous reptiles in the US. Oh, yes, squirrels in profusion.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
May 1, 2005 4:02:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sat, 30 Apr 2005 21:06:54 -0500, Ron Hunter wrote:

> Hawks are quite common here, things like hummingbirds a bit less easy to
> catch sight of.
> Skunks, coyotes, foxes, raccoon, deer, even an occasional wolf in the
> rural areas. LOTS of indigenous wildlife, including all 4 main types of
> poisonous reptiles in the US. Oh, yes, squirrels in profusion.

They may be common in other parts of the US, but most people don't
expect to see skunks, foxes and raccoons in NYC. I never saw
poisonous snakes within city limits but I'm sure there are some,
somewhere (not counting the zoos and illegal pets). Not too far
outside the city limits I've seen a good number, usually
rattlesnakes, but other types as well. Other animals are expected.
Squirrels, yes. Pigeons, yes. And of course the occasional rat.
I'm pleased to say that the only time I've seen tarantulas in the
wild was in TX. I've looked far and wide but never encountered the
exceedingly shy southwestern jackelope.
Anonymous
May 1, 2005 4:02:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

ASAAR wrote:
> On Sat, 30 Apr 2005 21:06:54 -0500, Ron Hunter wrote:
>
>> Hawks are quite common here, things like hummingbirds a bit less
>> easy to catch sight of.
>> Skunks, coyotes, foxes, raccoon, deer, even an occasional wolf in
>> the
>> rural areas. LOTS of indigenous wildlife, including all 4 main
>> types of poisonous reptiles in the US. Oh, yes, squirrels in
>> profusion.
>
> They may be common in other parts of the US, but most people don't
> expect to see skunks, foxes and raccoons in NYC. I never saw
> poisonous snakes within city limits but I'm sure there are some,
> somewhere (not counting the zoos and illegal pets). Not too far
> outside the city limits I've seen a good number, usually
> rattlesnakes, but other types as well. Other animals are expected.
> Squirrels, yes. Pigeons, yes. And of course the occasional rat.
> I'm pleased to say that the only time I've seen tarantulas in the
> wild was in TX. I've looked far and wide but never encountered the
> exceedingly shy southwestern jackelope.

I showed one of those to my wife a few years back. She has never
forgiven me.


--
Frank ess
Anonymous
May 1, 2005 5:13:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

ASAAR wrote:
> On Sat, 30 Apr 2005 21:06:54 -0500, Ron Hunter wrote:
>
>
>>Hawks are quite common here, things like hummingbirds a bit less easy to
>>catch sight of.
>>Skunks, coyotes, foxes, raccoon, deer, even an occasional wolf in the
>>rural areas. LOTS of indigenous wildlife, including all 4 main types of
>>poisonous reptiles in the US. Oh, yes, squirrels in profusion.
>
>
> They may be common in other parts of the US, but most people don't
> expect to see skunks, foxes and raccoons in NYC. I never saw
> poisonous snakes within city limits but I'm sure there are some,
> somewhere (not counting the zoos and illegal pets). Not too far
> outside the city limits I've seen a good number, usually
> rattlesnakes, but other types as well. Other animals are expected.
> Squirrels, yes. Pigeons, yes. And of course the occasional rat.
> I'm pleased to say that the only time I've seen tarantulas in the
> wild was in TX. I've looked far and wide but never encountered the
> exceedingly shy southwestern jackelope.
>
I am sure you can find skunks, and snakes (the no-legged variety) in
Central Park. Grin.
Texas is so large, and its territory so diverse, you are likely to find
just about any North American animal somewhere. There are even a few
bears, according to wildlife statistics, although I have never seen one
in the wild. Tarantulas are pretty common in the western part of the
state. The last place I worked before retiring, we had a 'breezeway'
connecting our building to the adjacent one, and it had doors that
opened when someone approached. One day a wild turkey got in there and
couldn't figure out how to get out. One of the computer operators had
to go out and manually open the exit door so it could get out. She said
the poor bird was frantic. When I came to work, there were feathers all
over the floor. The next week, sensors were installed to open the exit
doors automatically as well as for the entrance... We were right on the
edge of southwestern Fort Worth, near a large wooded area. I was really
surprised to hear that there were wild turkeys there. Sure would have
liked to get a picture of it!


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
May 1, 2005 9:07:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sat, 30 Apr 2005 23:35:35 -0700, Frank ess wrote:

> I need a good Flicker logo for my "FLICKER Photo" business card.

"Your Friend Flicker" or "Your Friend Flicker Photo" might work
for anyone that remembers "My Friend Flicka", a sentimental film
from 1943 starring Roddy McDowell and Preston Foster, about a boy
and a rebellious horse. It was later made into a TV series as well.
It would be nice if you could include a simple graphic that conveys
the sense of flickering images, but I'm not sure how you'd be able
to do that with a static picture, unless a sequence of several small
ones are used. Couldn't think of a good way to include flying
flickers.
May 1, 2005 3:15:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"ASAAR" <caught@22.com> wrote in message
news:kdd871p095kl61b62cldbb84svneotslrr@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 01 May 2005 00:01:58 GMT, JPS@no.komm wrote:
>
>> Same thing happened with hawks. Before a couple of years ago, I
>> remember only seeing wild hawks twice in my life. Now, I see hawks
>> almost every day, sometimes many in a day. I see them perched in
>> branches along the parkways, soaring in the thermals, flying out of
>> trees as I approach on foot, and perched on the parapets, fire escapes,
>> and terraces of apartment buildings in the Bronx when I'm at work.
>
> Not just birds. Within the last year I've seen a skunk in the
> early morning and a big fat raccoon late one evening. Foxes are
> occasionally seen, but I haven't as yet.
>

I have to put up with unwelcome visitors where I live, too.

http://photofan.multiply.com/photos/album/10

That, and possums and raccoons peeking through my patio doors at night. I
don't live very close to nearest lake but I've also seen tall snowy white
egrets strolling across my front lawn, and a couple of turkey vultures
nibbling on a carcass (gross!) a couple of doors down the street. Those
things are huge. They weren't phased in the least as I drove around them.
Anonymous
May 2, 2005 8:55:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

JPS@no.komm wrote:

> It seems as if most of us are conditioned to ignore a lot of things,
and
> birds are one of them.

Just stay at home and watch the TeeVee for important announcements from
Official Authority like everyone else and _maybe_ nothing bad will
happen to you.
Anonymous
May 2, 2005 10:25:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

JPS@no.komm wrote:
>
> Same thing happened with hawks. Before a couple of years ago, I
> remember only seeing wild hawks twice in my life. Now, I see hawks
> almost every day, sometimes many in a day. I see them perched in
> branches along the parkways, soaring in the thermals, flying out of
> trees as I approach on foot, and perched on the parapets, fire escapes,
> and terraces of apartment buildings in the Bronx when I'm at work. I
> have a couple that govern the Aqueduct and power line right-of-way
> behind my apartment. I just saw a couple flickers there, today,
> courting in the rain.
>

Are you sure those aren't peregrine falcons? They are much more common
in big cities and they even nest on the large buildings.

--
Thomas T. Veldhouse
Key Fingerprint: 2DB9 813F F510 82C2 E1AE 34D0 D69D 1EDC D5EC AED1
Spammers please contact me at renegade@veldy.net.
Anonymous
May 2, 2005 10:25:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Thomas T. Veldhouse wrote:
> JPS@no.komm wrote:
>>
>> Same thing happened with hawks. Before a couple of years ago, I
>> remember only seeing wild hawks twice in my life. Now, I see hawks
>> almost every day, sometimes many in a day. I see them perched in
>> branches along the parkways, soaring in the thermals, flying out of
>> trees as I approach on foot, and perched on the parapets, fire
>> escapes, and terraces of apartment buildings in the Bronx when I'm
>> at work. I have a couple that govern the Aqueduct and power line
>> right-of-way behind my apartment. I just saw a couple flickers
>> there, today, courting in the rain.
>>
>
> Are you sure those aren't peregrine falcons? They are much more
> common in big cities and they even nest on the large buildings.

A relatively easy and reliable way to tell the hawks from the falcons
as they fly is that the hawks' wings seem to have rounded or squared
tips, the falcons pointed.

Some areas have both Peregrins and kestrels, which seem very alike in
quick views. Kestrels have the ability to "hover" which you won't see
in many other birds.

--
Frank ess
Anonymous
May 3, 2005 3:46:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In message <42767087$0$53058$8046368a@newsreader.iphouse.net>,
"Thomas T. Veldhouse" <veldy71@yahoo.com> wrote:

>JPS@no.komm wrote:

>> Same thing happened with hawks. Before a couple of years ago, I
>> remember only seeing wild hawks twice in my life. Now, I see hawks
>> almost every day, sometimes many in a day. I see them perched in
>> branches along the parkways, soaring in the thermals, flying out of
>> trees as I approach on foot, and perched on the parapets, fire escapes,
>> and terraces of apartment buildings in the Bronx when I'm at work. I
>> have a couple that govern the Aqueduct and power line right-of-way
>> behind my apartment. I just saw a couple flickers there, today,
>> courting in the rain.

>Are you sure those aren't peregrine falcons? They are much more common
>in big cities and they even nest on the large buildings.

Peregrine Falcons are white, buff, and black. The hawks are brown and
buff, and most of them have red tails. There are far more hawks in NYC
than Peregrine Falcons. The hawks are ubiquitous, especially during the
winter, when the ones from higher elevations can't find any food with
the snow cover.

--

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
John P Sheehy <JPS@no.komm>
><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
May 3, 2005 4:40:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <1115077952.724895.245290@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com>,
<eawckyegcy@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>
>james wrote:
>
>> http://www.pbase.com/james_of_tucson/image/42743166
>
>James of _Tucson_, could it be that the "Flicker" is actually a Gila
>Woodpecker?
>

I am no ornithologist, so, yes. Absolutely. I don't know a Rock Dove
from a Thrush.
Anonymous
May 3, 2005 4:16:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Mon, 02 May 2005 23:46:11 GMT, in rec.photo.digital , JPS@no.komm
in <eged71dao5c4sr76fu7b09r3di4m56qcvq@4ax.com> wrote:

>In message <42767087$0$53058$8046368a@newsreader.iphouse.net>,
>"Thomas T. Veldhouse" <veldy71@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>>JPS@no.komm wrote:
>
>>> Same thing happened with hawks. Before a couple of years ago, I
>>> remember only seeing wild hawks twice in my life. Now, I see hawks
>>> almost every day, sometimes many in a day. I see them perched in
>>> branches along the parkways, soaring in the thermals, flying out of
>>> trees as I approach on foot, and perched on the parapets, fire escapes,
>>> and terraces of apartment buildings in the Bronx when I'm at work. I
>>> have a couple that govern the Aqueduct and power line right-of-way
>>> behind my apartment. I just saw a couple flickers there, today,
>>> courting in the rain.
>
>>Are you sure those aren't peregrine falcons? They are much more common
>>in big cities and they even nest on the large buildings.
>
>Peregrine Falcons are white, buff, and black. The hawks are brown and
>buff, and most of them have red tails. There are far more hawks in NYC
>than Peregrine Falcons. The hawks are ubiquitous, especially during the
>winter, when the ones from higher elevations can't find any food with
>the snow cover.

The exquisitely beautiful bird we saw in Riverside Park was clearly a
Peregrine. It was not hard to tell since it was about 15 feet away, on
the ground, facing me, with a dead squirrel in its talons. I would
describe the legs as "owl colored". That is, white with some brown
edges.


--
Matt Silberstein

All in all, if I could be any animal, I would want to be
a duck or a goose. They can fly, walk, and swim. Plus,
there there is a certain satisfaction knowing that at the
end of your life you will taste good with an orange sauce
or, in the case of a goose, a chestnut stuffing.
!