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Why Exposure Bracket Digital Photos?

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April 30, 2005 3:47:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hi.. What is the point in exposure bracketing with digital, when it can be
easily done on PC (unless the highlights/lowlights are blown out).
Anonymous
April 30, 2005 3:47:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

because it would give you more to play with if the setting was very under /
over exposed .

"Russell" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:47udnTnDqu61_O7fRVnyiA@pipex.net...
> Hi.. What is the point in exposure bracketing with digital, when it can be
> easily done on PC (unless the highlights/lowlights are blown out).
>
>
Anonymous
April 30, 2005 3:47:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hey Russell,

Probably because if you over or underexpose, you can possibly lose
detail beyond recovery - especially when the channels get clipped.
It's always best to expose correctly to get the most amount of detail
and dynamic range.

Jules
http://www.shuttertalk.com - the friendliest digital photography forums
on the net!

Russell wrote:
> Hi.. What is the point in exposure bracketing with digital, when it
can be
> easily done on PC (unless the highlights/lowlights are blown out).
Related resources
Anonymous
April 30, 2005 3:47:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Russell" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:47udnTnDqu61_O7fRVnyiA@pipex.net...
> Hi.. What is the point in exposure bracketing with digital, when it can be
> easily done on PC (unless the highlights/lowlights are blown out).
>
>
You can if you shoot in raw mode so you have some working room. Even so, the
narrow lattitude of digital will usually mean bracketing in the field. With
subjects of wide dynamic range, you could combine the two images to cover
that range.
-S
Anonymous
April 30, 2005 3:47:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Russell" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:47udnTnDqu61_O7fRVnyiA@pipex.net...
> Hi.. What is the point in exposure bracketing with digital, when it can be
> easily done on PC (unless the highlights/lowlights are blown out).
>
>

"unless the highlights/lowlights are blown out" You just answered your own
question, I think. Bracketing will help avoid blown highlights or no shadow
detail.

--
Skip Middleton
http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
Anonymous
April 30, 2005 3:47:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Russell" <nospam@nospam.com> writes:

> Hi.. What is the point in exposure bracketing with digital, when it
> can be easily done on PC (unless the highlights/lowlights are blown
> out).

Because often they are.

You can make fairly major exposure adjustments to scanned negatives,
too, but it's still useful to bracket sometimes.
--
David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:D d-b@dd-b.net>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/&gt;
RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/&gt; <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/&gt;
Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/&gt; <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/&gt;
Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/&gt;
Anonymous
April 30, 2005 6:01:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In message <47udnTnDqu61_O7fRVnyiA@pipex.net>,
"Russell" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:

>Hi.. What is the point in exposure bracketing with digital, when it can be
>easily done on PC (unless the highlights/lowlights are blown out).

It can be easily done, but it can easily be done poorly.

If an image is over-exposed, all detail above a certain brightness will
be clipped to the same value, and all detail is gone in that range. If
an image is under-exposed, then the noise can be almost as strong as the
signal, and the values used to represent the shadows are small in
number, posterizing the image and the noise.
--

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
John P Sheehy <JPS@no.komm>
><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
Anonymous
April 30, 2005 6:12:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In message <42738dff_3@newsfeed.slurp.net>,
"SimonLW" <anon@anon.com> wrote:

>"Russell" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
>news:47udnTnDqu61_O7fRVnyiA@pipex.net...
>> Hi.. What is the point in exposure bracketing with digital, when it can be
>> easily done on PC (unless the highlights/lowlights are blown out).

>You can if you shoot in raw mode so you have some working room. Even so, the
>narrow lattitude of digital will usually mean bracketing in the field.

Even RAW is not particularly kind to under-exposed shadows. It's the
nature of linear capture. The difference between 1 RAW level above
black and two RAW levels above black is a full stop!


--

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
John P Sheehy <JPS@no.komm>
><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
Anonymous
May 1, 2005 12:27:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Russell" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:

> Hi.. What is the point in exposure bracketing with digital, when it
> can be easily done on PC (unless the highlights/lowlights are blown
> out).
>
>
>

You answered your own question.
May 1, 2005 2:54:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <47udnTnDqu61_O7fRVnyiA@pipex.net>,
Russell <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:
>
>
>Hi.. What is the point in exposure bracketing with digital

The same point as with film. Aperture bracketing can give you varied
DoF, Shutter bracketing can give you varied motion, and ISO bracketing
can give you varied noise.
Anonymous
May 1, 2005 4:04:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In message <L0Uce.2702$_K.1635@fed1read03>,
fishbowl@conservatory.com (james) wrote:

>In article <47udnTnDqu61_O7fRVnyiA@pipex.net>,
>Russell <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:
>>
>>
>>Hi.. What is the point in exposure bracketing with digital
>
>The same point as with film. Aperture bracketing can give you varied
>DoF, Shutter bracketing can give you varied motion, and ISO bracketing
>can give you varied noise.

There are two very different types of ISO bracketing. One is to vary
the ISO, and leave the f-stop and/or shutter automatic. The other is to
fix the f-stop and the shutter speed, and vary the ISO. The latter does
not vary the noise per se, but rather, varies the distortion (the lower
the ISO, the more distortion there is, due to posterization).
--

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
John P Sheehy <JPS@no.komm>
><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
Anonymous
May 1, 2005 7:59:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <47udnTnDqu61_O7fRVnyiA@pipex.net>, nospam@nospam.com says...
> Hi.. What is the point in exposure bracketing with digital, when it can be
> easily done on PC (unless the highlights/lowlights are blown out).
>
>
>
As others have said, if you get the right exposure in the camera,
you have more latitude for all the things you may want to do in your
PC.

Some exposures are inherently difficult, and trusting the camera
to "do it right every time" is going to fail. Shooting into
heavy backlighting is especially tricky, and bracketing is the
easiest way to get it right. Sometimes the highlights are
going to get blown out, and bracketing gives you a series of
exposures that will let you choose the best balance of shadow
detail and not-too-far-blown-out highlights. (Or, depending on
the subject and your skill with Photoshop, maybe you can splice
two images together to get the best of both, but don't count on
that too much.)

The real alternative to bracketing is being able to read the
light you're shooting, knowing when the camera's normal automatic
metering is going to get into trouble, being able to "see" the
light where you want exposure to be dead-on, and switching to
spot metering to get the camera to expose for that specific
part of the image.

Being able to read light is a critical skill, both in the
sense of learning to understand the light you're shooting in,
and in being able to read a photograph to understand how
other photographers used light to get their results.

Diane
Anonymous
May 2, 2005 6:40:49 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Russell" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:47udnTnDqu61_O7fRVnyiA@pipex.net...
> Hi.. What is the point in exposure bracketing with digital, when it can be
> easily done on PC (unless the highlights/lowlights are blown out).


Because, like slide film, a digital camera only has about 5 stops of
dynamic range, while the human eye has around 10 stops of dynamic range so
what "looks right" to the eye often shows far too much contrast to the
camera. In many shooting situations outside the studio, it's all too often
not possible to preserve details in shadow without blowing highlights; thus,
bracketing and layered combination in Photoshop, etc. often results in a
better photo.

If you're taking pictures of field mice sitting on concrete on a really
cloudy day, then you don't have to bracket. Such photo opportunities are
rare, however
Anonymous
May 3, 2005 2:14:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Paul H. wrote:

> "Russell" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
> news:47udnTnDqu61_O7fRVnyiA@pipex.net...
>
>>Hi.. What is the point in exposure bracketing with digital, when it can be
>>easily done on PC (unless the highlights/lowlights are blown out).
>
>
>
> Because, like slide film, a digital camera only has about 5 stops of
> dynamic range, while the human eye has around 10 stops of dynamic range so
> what "looks right" to the eye often shows far too much contrast to the
> camera. In many shooting situations outside the studio, it's all too often
> not possible to preserve details in shadow without blowing highlights; thus,
> bracketing and layered combination in Photoshop, etc. often results in a
> better photo.
>
> If you're taking pictures of field mice sitting on concrete on a really
> cloudy day, then you don't have to bracket. Such photo opportunities are
> rare, however

Hi...

If I could add one more advantage to bracketing...

Absolutely fantastic for candid shots... an example
the grand kids sitting in the boat fishing, wearing hats
with wide brims somewhat shading their faces. Lots of
background water, little ripples reflecting incredibly
bright wave tops.

Obvious that I'll gladly beam out the white waves in favor
of the kids faces. Equally obvious that it's virtually
impossible to set it up beforehand without getting
everyone's attention and causing them to "pose"

Bracketing takes care of it all automagically :) 

Take care.

Ken
May 3, 2005 5:15:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Russell" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:

>Hi.. What is the point in exposure bracketing with digital, when it can be
>easily done on PC (unless the highlights/lowlights are blown out).
>

I had a situation where I was taking a photo of a lake near some tall
trees late in the day. There were sun on the trees and a shadow from
the trees on the lake which made the correct exposure difficult.
If I got the exposure for the lack correct then the trees were too
bright and washed out details.
If the trees were exposed correctly then the lake would be too dark.
This is were bracket exposure can be useful.
Once I had photos of the lake using different exposures I could on the
computer separate the lake and the trees and join the correctly
exposed trees to the correctly exposed lake using a photo editing
program.
Also using bracket exposure I was able to have the same exact scene in
each photo as I did not need to move the camera.

Regards Brian
May 3, 2005 3:17:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Ken Weitzel <kweitzel@shaw.ca> wrote:

>
>
>Paul H. wrote:
>
>> "Russell" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
>> news:47udnTnDqu61_O7fRVnyiA@pipex.net...
>>
>>>Hi.. What is the point in exposure bracketing with digital, when it can be
>>>easily done on PC (unless the highlights/lowlights are blown out).
>>
>>
>>
>> Because, like slide film, a digital camera only has about 5 stops of
>> dynamic range, while the human eye has around 10 stops of dynamic range so
>> what "looks right" to the eye often shows far too much contrast to the
>> camera. In many shooting situations outside the studio, it's all too often
>> not possible to preserve details in shadow without blowing highlights; thus,
>> bracketing and layered combination in Photoshop, etc. often results in a
>> better photo.
>>
>> If you're taking pictures of field mice sitting on concrete on a really
>> cloudy day, then you don't have to bracket. Such photo opportunities are
>> rare, however
>
>Hi...
>
>If I could add one more advantage to bracketing...
>
>Absolutely fantastic for candid shots... an example
>the grand kids sitting in the boat fishing, wearing hats
>with wide brims somewhat shading their faces. Lots of
>background water, little ripples reflecting incredibly
>bright wave tops.
>
>Obvious that I'll gladly beam out the white waves in favor
>of the kids faces. Equally obvious that it's virtually
>impossible to set it up beforehand without getting
>everyone's attention and causing them to "pose"
>
>Bracketing takes care of it all automagically :) 
>
>Take care.
>
>Ken

As childen don't stay still you must have to rapidly take the
bracketed shots, maybe you use Continously drive to take several
photos per second.

Regards Brian
Anonymous
May 3, 2005 3:41:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <o3dd71d4066franqksmsb0gq4sg8ji9p31@4ax.com>, bclark@es.co.nz
says...
> Ken Weitzel <kweitzel@shaw.ca> wrote:
>
> >
> >
> >Paul H. wrote:
> >
> >> "Russell" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
> >> news:47udnTnDqu61_O7fRVnyiA@pipex.net...
> >>
> >>>Hi.. What is the point in exposure bracketing with digital, when it can be
> >>>easily done on PC (unless the highlights/lowlights are blown out).
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> Because, like slide film, a digital camera only has about 5 stops of
> >> dynamic range, while the human eye has around 10 stops of dynamic range so
> >> what "looks right" to the eye often shows far too much contrast to the
> >> camera. In many shooting situations outside the studio, it's all too often
> >> not possible to preserve details in shadow without blowing highlights; thus,
> >> bracketing and layered combination in Photoshop, etc. often results in a
> >> better photo.
> >>
> >> If you're taking pictures of field mice sitting on concrete on a really
> >> cloudy day, then you don't have to bracket. Such photo opportunities are
> >> rare, however
> >
> >Hi...
> >
> >If I could add one more advantage to bracketing...
> >
> >Absolutely fantastic for candid shots... an example
> >the grand kids sitting in the boat fishing, wearing hats
> >with wide brims somewhat shading their faces. Lots of
> >background water, little ripples reflecting incredibly
> >bright wave tops.
> >
> >Obvious that I'll gladly beam out the white waves in favor
> >of the kids faces. Equally obvious that it's virtually
> >impossible to set it up beforehand without getting
> >everyone's attention and causing them to "pose"
> >
> >Bracketing takes care of it all automagically :) 
> >
> >Take care.
> >
> >Ken
>
> As childen don't stay still you must have to rapidly take the
> bracketed shots, maybe you use Continously drive to take several
> photos per second.

Continuous shooting mode plus auto bracketing, yeah.

The alternative would be to learn to spot meter, and meter
for the shadows (kids faces).

Diane
Anonymous
May 3, 2005 5:37:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Diane Wilson wrote:

> In article <o3dd71d4066franqksmsb0gq4sg8ji9p31@4ax.com>, bclark@es.co.nz
> says...
>
>>Ken Weitzel <kweitzel@shaw.ca> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>
>>>Paul H. wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>"Russell" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
>>>>news:47udnTnDqu61_O7fRVnyiA@pipex.net...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Hi.. What is the point in exposure bracketing with digital, when it can be
>>>>>easily done on PC (unless the highlights/lowlights are blown out).
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>Because, like slide film, a digital camera only has about 5 stops of
>>>>dynamic range, while the human eye has around 10 stops of dynamic range so
>>>>what "looks right" to the eye often shows far too much contrast to the
>>>>camera. In many shooting situations outside the studio, it's all too often
>>>>not possible to preserve details in shadow without blowing highlights; thus,
>>>>bracketing and layered combination in Photoshop, etc. often results in a
>>>>better photo.
>>>>
>>>>If you're taking pictures of field mice sitting on concrete on a really
>>>>cloudy day, then you don't have to bracket. Such photo opportunities are
>>>>rare, however
>>>
>>>Hi...
>>>
>>>If I could add one more advantage to bracketing...
>>>
>>>Absolutely fantastic for candid shots... an example
>>>the grand kids sitting in the boat fishing, wearing hats
>>>with wide brims somewhat shading their faces. Lots of
>>>background water, little ripples reflecting incredibly
>>>bright wave tops.
>>>
>>>Obvious that I'll gladly beam out the white waves in favor
>>>of the kids faces. Equally obvious that it's virtually
>>>impossible to set it up beforehand without getting
>>>everyone's attention and causing them to "pose"
>>>
>>>Bracketing takes care of it all automagically :) 
>>>
>>>Take care.
>>>
>>>Ken
>>
>>As childen don't stay still you must have to rapidly take the
>>bracketed shots, maybe you use Continously drive to take several
>>photos per second.
>
>
> Continuous shooting mode plus auto bracketing, yeah.
>
> The alternative would be to learn to spot meter, and meter
> for the shadows (kids faces).
>
> Diane

Hi Diane...

Guessing that you've never had the joy of fishing with
grandkids yet...

Their little heads look at the horizon, then each other,
then back to where their lines are in the water. Toward
the sun, then 180 degrees off. Tip up, then down to the water.
Non-stop action :) 

The only way to meter them properly would be by posing them,
or waiting 'till they're almost "out of steam".

Take care.

Ken
May 4, 2005 4:34:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Diane Wilson wrote:
>
> The alternative would be to learn to spot meter, and meter
> for the shadows (kids faces).
>
> Diane

that still wouldn't sort out the blown highlights... Though, shooting in
RAW does allow you a bit more flexibility. If you can stand the extra
processing!

Malc
!