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What CPU for VMware player ?

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  • CPUs
  • Support
  • VMware
Last response: in CPUs
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March 8, 2012 2:02:28 PM

Hi All

I'm buying a new PC, I want to run 64bit virtual machines on it using VMware Player ontop of Windows7, which has the following requirements stated here:
http://www.vmware.com/pdf/vmware_player40.pdf page7

1.
"The host system must have a 64-bit x86 CPU that meets the following requirements.
LAHF/SAHF support in long mode"

2.
"To run 64-bit guest operating systems, the host system must have one of the following processors.
An AMD CPU that has segment-limit support in long mode
An Intel CPU that has VT-x support"


What processor might I get e.g AMD A8 or Intel i5 that meet the requirements above?

Thanks in advance
Bob

More about : cpu vmware player

March 8, 2012 2:24:02 PM

the general consensus is that the intel 2600k is the best for virtual machines tho .. a cheaper 2500k would do just as well.

u really dont *need* them extra 4 threads.
March 8, 2012 2:44:17 PM

Thanks for the quick response!
That's a shame - the AMD A8 works out cheaper, is it just slower or does it have problems with the VMware player requirements?
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a b à CPUs
March 8, 2012 4:24:51 PM

I just got a i7 2670 laptop with 12 gigs ram from work and I can run 4 VM's with no issue at the same time using VM ware player this would be server 2008/Windows 7/Windows 8/Linux Mint ... it is nice to be able to give each os 2 cores not sure what you are looking for... But if you are just running 1 vm then use the i5 or the A8 both will be fine for 1.

Thent
March 8, 2012 4:25:29 PM

BackupBob said:
Thanks for the quick response!
That's a shame - the AMD A8 works out cheaper, is it just slower or does it have problems with the VMware player requirements?


Honestly, i'm using an E-350 in gigabyte mini-itx MB with ESXI. It is free !! Why don't you go all the way and use VMware Hypervisor. Isn't hard to import VMs to that. All AMD CPU have VM extensions. Intel, not so sure.

What are you going to do with that box anyway ?


March 8, 2012 4:31:09 PM

I'm not sure the 2600k is specifically the best for VMs...I highly doubt you'd need the unlocked multiplier on it, unless you were planning on overclocking. The 2600 (without the K) would offer the same features, minus the unlocked multiplier.

I think you'll be OK with most modern processors as long as they meet those requirements.

I'll agree about the extra threads...you can use them in VMware, but if you don't need them, a 2500 or even a 2400 would be quite a bit cheaper (on the Intel side) or certainly an AMD quad or hex core could work too.

Keep in mind that when you are running a few VMs, you will be borrowing resources from your host OS (CPU, RAM, and even disk I/O).
March 8, 2012 4:33:17 PM

Darn it...was typing, then two others replied.

I'll second the user of ESXi if you are OK with another box. It's free and very powerful. I have it on a box at home and manage it at work.

If you just want to do it on your regular OS, the VMware player or VirtualBox are great options and a modern processor will be plenty to handle it.

I user Workstation (paid version...similar to Player) and can run a Windows7, Windows XP, CentOS and Linux Mint and not bog down too bad...

Similar specs to above poster - i7 2720QM, 8GB RAM on top of Win7 x64 Enterprise
March 8, 2012 4:36:24 PM

My end aim is to run a Symantec NetBackup Master Server, which needs to be on Windows Server or Linux. This is just for training myself rather than doing real backups.

I'm guessing the long mode requirements are not an issue, but as I don't know what it is I thought I should check before I buy.
a c 190 à CPUs
March 8, 2012 4:44:10 PM

The problem is that the Intel® Core™ i7-2600K or the Intel Core i5-2500K don't have support for VT-d (Virtulization with Directed I/O) that are lot of people using. In order to get VT-d support you would need to get a normal Intel Core i7-2600 processor or one of the other normal models and a board that support VT-d like the Intel Desktop board DQ67SW or DQ67OW.

Christian Wood
Intel Enthusiast Team
March 8, 2012 4:51:52 PM

IntelEnthusiast said:
The problem is that the Intel® Core™ i7-2600K or the Intel Core i5-2500K don't have support for VT-d (Virtulization with Directed I/O) that are lot of people using. In order to get VT-d support you would need to get a normal Intel Core i7-2600 processor or one of the other normal models and a board that support VT-d like the Intel Desktop board DQ67SW or DQ67OW.

Christian Wood
Intel Enthusiast Team



I have a DC, IIS, Sharepoint, Pandora FMS and a Wiki. Several WS and RH Enterprise. On a AMD E-350. He is doing that just for training like a Home Lab. All Above an ESXI, witch is Red Hat Box anyway. OP, save your money, you are not going to use much cpu, just take 8 GB Ram and Several Disks. For the Price of an I7, you buy MB+CPU+RAM. And it is fully compatible.

Edit: And WXSP3 Jumpbox too !

!