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Is this chipset runs really hot?

Last response: in Motherboards
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January 13, 2013 3:17:40 PM

when i touch this part after switching off my cpu it was very hot so does this part generally runs very hot but i didn't feel that much greater temp on the other chipset heatsink.

More about : chipset runs hot

a c 151 V Motherboard
a c 117 à CPUs
January 13, 2013 7:10:45 PM

That is a large heatsink meant to dissipate quite a bit of heat. The main cause of the heat there is the Intel GMA 3100 graphics chip underneath. You can purchase an aftermarket heatsink/fan to keep it cooler. You can also try and increase airflow within your case which will help remove the heat. Since it is a passive heatsink, the more air that travel around it, the cooler it'll stay
Hope it helps
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a c 168 V Motherboard
a c 171 à CPUs
January 13, 2013 7:25:17 PM

vishalaestro said:
http://s20.postimage.org/svhsl7a99/asusp5krear_L.jpg when i touch this part after switching off my cpu it was very hot so does this part generally runs very hot but i didn't feel that much greater temp on the other chipset heatsink.


There are two main chips on chipsets prior to Intel 6 series. The North Bridge and the South Bridge.

The North Bridge houses the memory controller, high speed PCIe lanes, and an IGP if one is present.

The South Bridge houses the PATA/SATA controllers, USB controllers, IIC controllers (for firmware access), RTC controller, PCI controllers (if present), FDD controller (if present), ISB controller (if present), and more.

The functions previously performed by the North Bridge have been completely integrated into the CPU as of the Sandybridge architecture, or into the CPU package as a separate chip with second generation Nehalem processors. As a result, the North Bridge is no longer found on modern motherboards and the South Bridge is more often called the PCH or Platform Controller Hub.

Since the North Bridge handles high bandwidth applications it gets quite a bit hotter than the South Bridge, but it does not get quite as hot as the CPU itself and often requires only a heat sink.

It's normal for heatsinks to get hot, that's what they're designed to do. What appears hot to us is actually fairly cool for most electronics. If your computer is running normally there's nothing to worry about.
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January 14, 2013 2:28:21 AM

C12Friedman said:
That is a large heatsink meant to dissipate quite a bit of heat. The main cause of the heat there is the Intel GMA 3100 graphics chip underneath. You can purchase an aftermarket heatsink/fan to keep it cooler. You can also try and increase airflow within your case which will help remove the heat. Since it is a passive heatsink, the more air that travel around it, the cooler it'll stay
Hope it helps

but i'm using only a discrete gpu how can that get very hot without using it?
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January 14, 2013 2:35:08 AM

Pinhedd said:
There are two main chips on chipsets prior to Intel 6 series. The North Bridge and the South Bridge.

The North Bridge houses the memory controller, high speed PCIe lanes, and an IGP if one is present.

The South Bridge houses the PATA/SATA controllers, USB controllers, IIC controllers (for firmware access), RTC controller, PCI controllers (if present), FDD controller (if present), ISB controller (if present), and more.

The functions previously performed by the North Bridge have been completely integrated into the CPU as of the Sandybridge architecture, or into the CPU package as a separate chip with second generation Nehalem processors. As a result, the North Bridge is no longer found on modern motherboards and the South Bridge is more often called the PCH or Platform Controller Hub.

Since the North Bridge handles high bandwidth applications it gets quite a bit hotter than the South Bridge, but it does not get quite as hot as the CPU itself and often requires only a heat sink.

It's normal for heatsinks to get hot, that's what they're designed to do. What appears hot to us is actually fairly cool for most electronics. If your computer is running normally there's nothing to worry about.

i asked this because my core temps are 100c at 100% cpu usage but the cpu temp remaining constant at 73c.i ran 10 cycles of intel burn test my cpu passed the stablity test bt my core got disabled since they were reaching their max temp of 101c see this http://s20.postimage.org/h2tofdm0d/tmps_reading.png when i run intel burn test both my core got disabled with core0 not showing on my HW monitor however the cpu temps were remaining same.my cpu is 3ghz but it never got to 3ghz at 100% cpu usage since core temps were very high it instead got back to 2ghz to save the processor from over heating.i reapplied the thermal paste and reseated the processor heatsink.
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a c 151 V Motherboard
a c 117 à CPUs
January 14, 2013 2:45:07 AM

Are you using the stock intel heatsink?
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a c 168 V Motherboard
a c 171 à CPUs
January 14, 2013 3:27:47 AM

vishalaestro said:
i asked this because my core temps are 100c at 100% cpu usage but the cpu temp remaining constant at 73c.i ran 10 cycles of intel burn test my cpu passed the stablity test bt my core got disabled since they were reaching their max temp of 101c see this http://s20.postimage.org/h2tofdm0d/tmps_reading.png when i run intel burn test both my core got disabled with core0 not showing on my HW monitor however the cpu temps were remaining same.my cpu is 3ghz but it never got to 3ghz at 100% cpu usage since core temps were very high it instead got back to 2ghz to save the processor from over heating.i reapplied the thermal paste and reseated the processor heatsink.


That looks like a buggy temperature sensor to me, it's reading negatives which is only possible if you're playing in the high arctic or are using vapor cooling.

Are you running a Penryn core processor? (Second generation Core 2)
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January 14, 2013 3:53:58 AM

Pinhedd said:
That looks like a buggy temperature sensor to me, it's reading negatives which is only possible if you're playing in the high arctic or are using vapor cooling.

Are you running a Penryn core processor? (Second generation Core 2)

my processor is core2duo E8400 running at stock speeds with stock cooler .the problem is i can feel the heat on side of the case itself i found the hot air was coming from the graphic card which was running at 55c at idle my gpu was never to be hot on my previous gigabyte 945gzms2 borad wit hthe hottest pentium d 3ghz processor only on this board all the temps were high
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a c 168 V Motherboard
a c 171 à CPUs
January 14, 2013 5:18:56 AM

vishalaestro said:
my processor is core2duo E8400 running at stock speeds with stock cooler .the problem is i can feel the heat on side of the case itself i found the hot air was coming from the graphic card which was running at 55c at idle my gpu was never to be hot on my previous gigabyte 945gzms2 borad wit hthe hottest pentium d 3ghz processor only on this board all the temps were high


Yup, that's a Penryn alright. Those processors are known for having buggy thermal diodes on them which are unreliable at low temperatures. They'll often show temperatures which are far too cold or far too hot which is what you're seeing. If your PC isn't malfunctioning then temperatures are not an issue. Integrated Circuits are designed to take heat, you have nothing at all to worry about.
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January 14, 2013 7:01:34 AM

Pinhedd said:
Yup, that's a Penryn alright. Those processors are known for having buggy thermal diodes on them which are unreliable at low temperatures. They'll often show temperatures which are far too cold or far too hot which is what you're seeing. If your PC isn't malfunctioning then temperatures are not an issue. Integrated Circuits are designed to take heat, you have nothing at all to worry about.

but i can feel the heat in my case and the cpu is not running in 3ghz it runs only in 2ghz due to high temp.
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a c 168 V Motherboard
a c 171 à CPUs
January 14, 2013 11:17:51 AM

vishalaestro said:
but i can feel the heat in my case and the cpu is not running in 3ghz it runs only in 2ghz due to high temp.


Don't worry about what you feel, all computers will run hot no matter what. What seems hot to us is a cool afternoon breeze to them.

If you want, you can always change the thermal paste on the heatsinks.
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January 14, 2013 11:38:36 AM

Pinhedd said:
Don't worry about what you feel, all computers will run hot no matter what. What seems hot to us is a cool afternoon breeze to them.

If you want, you can always change the thermal paste on the heatsinks.

so what do u say about the clock speed at 100% cpu usage the cpu clock must at it's maximum but this is not the case for me it runs only at 2ghz.and my older pentium D 3ghz processor with the same gpu on a gigabyte 945gzm-s2 motherboard was not like this clearly the core2duo processor must run cooler and quieter which is not now.
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a c 168 V Motherboard
a c 171 à CPUs
January 14, 2013 11:41:31 AM

vishalaestro said:
so what do u say about the clock speed at 100% cpu usage the cpu clock must at it's maximum but this is not the case for me it runs only at 2ghz.


Are you sure about that? Check and see if there's a firmware update for that motherboard to enable full support for the Core2 processors.
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January 14, 2013 12:07:50 PM

Pinhedd said:
Are you sure about that? Check and see if there's a firmware update for that motherboard to enable full support for the Core2 processors.

i have done all that crap but still it's not working just see this pic http://s20.postimage.org/ch25krpv1/no3ghz.png you can see from the cpu-z that i'm not getting 3ghz even at 100% cpu usage this means that my cpu cores are running very hot isn't it?my gpu was also running very hot at 50-55c at idle since i fitted an 80mm fan as intake by removing the rear fan it's 45c at idle now before the hot air coming from the gpu will heat up my case severely even when i removed the gpu, the cpu temps and core temps were same .i also have added an 120mm at side for cpu intake.is this motherboard problem or processor problem?i think it's the motherboard's voltage regulators around cpu and gpu.
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a c 168 V Motherboard
a c 171 à CPUs
January 14, 2013 1:14:43 PM

vishalaestro said:
i have done all that crap but still it's not working just see this pic http://s20.postimage.org/ch25krpv1/no3ghz.png you can see from the cpu-z that i'm not getting 3ghz even at 100% cpu usage this means that my cpu cores are running very hot isn't it?my gpu was also running very hot at 50-55c at idle since i fitted an 80mm fan as intake by removing the rear fan it's 45c at idle now before the hot air coming from the gpu will heat up my case severely even when i removed the gpu, the cpu temps and core temps were same .i also have added an 120mm at side for cpu intake.is this motherboard problem or processor problem?i think it's the motherboard's voltage regulators around cpu and gpu.


The Penryn architecture introduced changes to the CPU PLL which necessitated a firmware update. Make sure that you have firmware revision 1001 installed. Also do a complete reset of the firmware settings to undo any power/speed settings that you might have changed.
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January 17, 2013 7:03:07 AM

your motherboard is dying. change it before it burns any other components
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January 17, 2013 10:04:39 AM

rezervesizeja said:
your motherboard is dying. change it before it burns any other components

i found the problem dude it's the processor that's overheating i took my mobo to asus service Engineer and he said that the mobo was fine but it's the processor that got problems.
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a b V Motherboard
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January 17, 2013 12:50:56 PM

You run intel burn test with a stock cpu cooler that is why you messed up the cpu.
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January 17, 2013 3:24:02 PM

aqe040466 said:
You run intel burn test with a stock cpu cooler that is why you messed up the cpu.

i has this problem when i ran the intel burn test .i ran prime95 small fft 3 times and then i ran intel burn test from which i got the stability test passed.and you should know that intel stock coolers are very much fine at stock speeds even at 100% cpu usage .
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