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B75 motherboard support ?

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January 14, 2013 1:08:55 PM

Hi guys,
Im new in pc building and i wanted to know if a b75 motherboard
http://www.directcanada.com/products/?sku=16950BD9882
Support a i3-3220 CPU , 8gb of 1600 ddr3 memory http://www.directcanada.com/products/?sku=16950AC5660
And a gtx 660 ti already overclocked http://www.directcanada.com/products/?sku=11830BD8287

Thanks
January 14, 2013 1:41:32 PM

immortals44 said:
Hi guys,
Im new in pc building and i wanted to know if a b75 motherboard
http://www.directcanada.com/products/?sku=16950BD9882
Support a i3-3220 CPU , 8gb of 1600 ddr3 memory http://www.directcanada.com/products/?sku=16950AC5660
And a gtx 660 ti already overclocked http://www.directcanada.com/products/?sku=11830BD8287

Thanks

Yes it does. A B75 motherboard will support all ivy bridge CPU's, but I don't know how well it supports overclocking for the CPU (or overvoltage to the GPU).
And you don't need to worry about it not supporting a GTX 660 Ti. Almost all modern motherboards can support a mid-high-range GPU.
But yes, you should be OK.
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January 14, 2013 1:52:11 PM

hammereditor said:
Yes it does. A B75 motherboard will support all ivy bridge CPU's, but I don't know how well it supports overclocking for the CPU (or overvoltage to the GPU).

All non-K CPUs have locked multipliers and therefore are not overclockable beyond the ~5% tolerance on BCLK.

As for the K-chips, a z68/z75/z77 chipset is required to unlock them, so multiplier overclocking is simply impossible on b75/h77 motherboards.

As for motherboard support, all 3rd-gen LGA1155 motherboards support IB CPUs announced at launch but BIOS update may be required for the newer i3-3225 (i3 with HD4000) and i5-3330P (i5 without IGP) which were announced a few months after launch.
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January 14, 2013 2:18:05 PM

I have a very similar setup (i3 3220, P8B75-M CSM mobo, 8 GB RAM, Radeon HD7850). That motherboard will work just fine.

The main drawbacks of B75 versus z77 (the popular choice du jour):

-No overclocking (B75 is a business chipset, so no mysteries there)

-No guarantee of Intel Smart Response Technology support (which allows you to use a small SSD as a cache drive; some models of B75 do support SRT, but it's an optional feature for the chipset. As far as I know, the Asus mobo you're looking to use doesn't support it)

-One fewer SATA 3 port (B75 still has six SATA ports total, but only one that provides 6 Gb/sec transfer speeds), and 2 fewer USB (2.0) ports

-Supports only 16 GB of memory, as opposed to 32 GB for z77

Unless you have very specific usage requirements, none of the above should be a deal-breaker. As InvalidError points out, the i3 doesn't support overclocking regardless, so that's a wash. It's no surprise that the overclocking chipsets would receive the most attention on sites like Tom's, but I do think some of the lesser chipsets, like B75, are underrated.

(Oh, and if your P8B75-M LE is anything like my P8B75-M CSM, then it will support the i3 3220 out of the box. :)  )
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January 14, 2013 2:21:53 PM

Best answer selected by immortals44.
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January 14, 2013 3:31:23 PM

Fulgurant said:
-Supports only 16 GB of memory, as opposed to 32 GB for z77

Memory is connected directly to the CPU, chipset has no influence on how much RAM the CPU can manage and as such, there is no mention of anything related to RAM on Intel's chipset spec sheets.

The reason why some boards only support 16GB RAM is because they only have two DIMM slots, which is more common on lower-end boards sporting lower-end chipsets. As long as the motherboard vendor did not mess up BIOS support for 32GB RAM and the CPU/RAM does not run into signal integrity issues, any quad-DIMM LGA1155/1156 board supports 32GB.
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January 14, 2013 3:57:46 PM

InvalidError said:
Memory is connected directly to the CPU, chipset has no influence on how much RAM the CPU can manage and as such, there is no mention of anything related to RAM on Intel's chipset spec sheets.

The reason why some boards only support 16GB RAM is because they only have two DIMM slots, which is more common on lower-end boards sporting lower-end chipsets. As long as the motherboard vendor did not mess up BIOS support for 32GB RAM and the CPU/RAM does not run into signal integrity issues, any quad-DIMM LGA1155/1156 board supports 32GB.


Yeah, my fault. I was referring to the spec sheet for the OP's specific motherboard as a quick reference. I thought that my motherboard, which supports 4 DIMMs, was limited to 16 GB, but it isn't.

(My version of Windows 7 is limited to 16 GB, though, so that's probably why i was remembering a 16 GB limitation. :)  )

Anyway, if the OP can afford it, he might look into grabbing the version of the P8B75-M that supports 4 DIMMs, if only because it'll make a future memory upgrade easier/cheaper.
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