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First time PC builder, looking for system advice! Please!

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December 5, 2011 5:27:24 PM

Hi there, everyone. I am building my very first pc by myself. I have done a ton of research, but would feel so much better with professional advice regarding my decisions. I have just a few questions. Thank you so much!

I thought I should mention as well, that I am building this system for gaming only. Also, I am not interested in overclocking due to inexperience with pc building as a whole. I am just looking for a great system that will be very stable.

On a side note, will this system be powerful enough to run Star Wars: The Old Republic on ultra high settings with high FPS and without any lag?

Thank you so much, I really greatly appreciate any response.


Does this look like it would be a solid system?

Does everything look compatible?

Any improvements to be made?

Can you recommend a case, power supply, and hard drive?


My current build (in theory):

CPU - Intel Core i5-2500 3.3ghz Quad Core

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...

Motherboard - ASUS P8P67 PRO (REV 3.1) LGA 1155 Intel P67 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...

GPU - MSI N560GTX-Ti Twn Frozr II 2GD5/OC GeForce GTX 560-Ti Video Card

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...

Memory - G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Operating System - Windows 7 Professional, 64 bit

More about : time builder system advice

December 6, 2011 1:23:06 AM

Anyone? Please, I could really use some expert opinions on this. I have never done this before.

I am really nervous that these parts will not work well together or that they will not allow me to play Star Wars: The Old Republic without getting low fps or lag.
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a b B Homebuilt system
December 6, 2011 1:50:07 AM

As far as I can tell, SWTOR has as yet unknown requirements. [EDIT: Incorrect. See AxemanACL's post below.] They have leaked minimums, but until the game is out and tested, nobody can answer you. That said, the GTX 560 Ti is at the top of its teir, but its tier is the second one, so I would expect it to disappoint as an enthusiast card, if that's what you're after. I like your other parts, but get as much graphics card as you can afford if you want buttery-smooth eye candy.

Here's what I did many moons ago, by way of illustration. I built an AMD rig with a GTX 9800, thinking I would go for middle-high. Wrong. I immediately threw that thing like a discus and stuck in a GTX 280. Better. Much better. Almost adequate, in fact. But after a while I couldn't stand it and got my present 295. If nVidia could write a working driver, it would be adequate (for DX10); it runs FC2 maxed. I'm now saving up for a 590. So, my son, don't be a silly Willy like me. Get a mammoth graphics card right away.

There are rabid PSU mongers in here who will control your purchase in that respect. There are also case genies. Listen to them. As for the OS drive, get a 128G M4 SSD, and add a 1T storage HDD when the prices come back down later.
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a c 122 B Homebuilt system
December 6, 2011 2:20:23 AM

You do not need Win7 Pro for a gaming system. Take the money that you save by buying Win7 Home and put part of it toward an i5-K. The small price difference leaves the overclocking option open.

Put the rest toward a GTX560Ti-448. The -448 is basically a slightly cripped GTX 570.

PSU - an XFX 650 watt :
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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December 6, 2011 3:00:08 AM

Thank you both, very much! I am now looking at upgrading the graphics and am going to research the cards that you have suggested! And thank you very much for the storage and power supply suggestions as well! I am going to start researching right away!

How does this case look?

Cooler Master RC-310-BWN1-GP Elite 310 Mid-Tower Case - ATX, mATX

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/searchtools/ite...

I am a little afraid that I may find a case that ends up being too small for my motherboard. Does this look like a good case for gaming? Do you think the fans are sufficient? I don't know what I am looking for, but I know that I want to make sure that I keep the system nice and cool.

Thank you so so much!

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a b B Homebuilt system
December 6, 2011 3:13:29 AM

Check my sig for a few suggestions :) 
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a b B Homebuilt system
December 6, 2011 3:50:24 AM

I personally prefer cases with a bit more airflow than that one. That front 120mm fan honestly does not look like it will be very effective - mostly blocked by the front panel in one direction and the hard drive bays in the other. And the side fan placement obviously was done with looking cool as the first priority, and airflow second -- I would want it a few inches up and few inches forward.

It also looks like - not 100% sure, but it LOOKS LIKE from some of the comments - it may be one of those cases where you can't get to the left side of the drive bays without removing the motherboard. If that's true, then if you ever want to add or change a hard drive, DVD-RW, card reader, etc., you'll basically have to take the whole machine apart. Trust me, that sucks.

All of this is why the Antec 300 is possibly my favorite case to work with ever - great airflow, easy to work with, and you can get in and out in no time flat:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Also -- as for hard drives, you picked a BAD time. I'd normally never recommend doing this, but if you can reuse one or cannibalize one from a secondhand machine, you should seriously consider it as a stopgap for the next 6 months or so. A good 1TB hard drive normally costs $50-$60, sometimes $40 if you can find one on sale. As of a few weeks ago, they've gone up to $150 or more, thanks to a flood in Asia that wiped out a Western Digital parts factory and therefore something like 25% of worldwide production capacity. If you can find a way to get by for, like, 6 months (either by reusing a hard drive or holding off building the machine), things will likely get back to normal, but for now you will get absolutely raped on the price of those.
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December 6, 2011 4:33:40 PM

Thank you, everyone, so much for the advice! I really greatly appreciate it! Everyone here is so very helpful! I feel much better, and I have some great ideas!

Also, I went to look at buying my ram last night, and they were all sold out on Newegg.com. Do you think that this is the best gaming ram for the P67 boards? I don't know what I should do if I can't find somewhere that has it in stock.

I also did some more research regarding video cards, I am not too sure what would be my best option. Does anyone know of a good benchmark GPU, where I can get the most bang for my buck?

Lastly, I noticed that there are a ton of different types of the ASUS P8P67 motherboards. Do you think that my choice is the best choice for a gamer? Or would one of the other options be preferable? ASUS P8P67 PRO 3.0 (REV 3.1), ASUS P8P67 (REV 3.1), ASUS P8P67 (REV 3.0)? The subtle differences seem a little overwhelming for a first time builder.

Or is there a better motherboard out there? One that will work well with the Sandy Briggs i5?

Thank you very much!
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December 6, 2011 6:29:26 PM

capt_taco said:
I personally prefer cases with a bit more airflow than that one. That front 120mm fan honestly does not look like it will be very effective - mostly blocked by the front panel in one direction and the hard drive bays in the other. And the side fan placement obviously was done with looking cool as the first priority, and airflow second -- I would want it a few inches up and few inches forward.

It also looks like - not 100% sure, but it LOOKS LIKE from some of the comments - it may be one of those cases where you can't get to the left side of the drive bays without removing the motherboard. If that's true, then if you ever want to add or change a hard drive, DVD-RW, card reader, etc., you'll basically have to take the whole machine apart. Trust me, that sucks.

All of this is why the Antec 300 is possibly my favorite case to work with ever - great airflow, easy to work with, and you can get in and out in no time flat:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Also -- as for hard drives, you picked a BAD time. I'd normally never recommend doing this, but if you can reuse one or cannibalize one from a secondhand machine, you should seriously consider it as a stopgap for the next 6 months or so. A good 1TB hard drive normally costs $50-$60, sometimes $40 if you can find one on sale. As of a few weeks ago, they've gone up to $150 or more, thanks to a flood in Asia that wiped out a Western Digital parts factory and therefore something like 25% of worldwide production capacity. If you can find a way to get by for, like, 6 months (either by reusing a hard drive or holding off building the machine), things will likely get back to normal, but for now you will get absolutely raped on the price of those.



Agree on the fans - especially the front - but don't see the drive problem. Remove mobo? Don't see that at all. Surely just remove the panel for 5.25 & 3.25 external bays, remove the monster GPU for the internal HDD bays - assuming a REALLY big card. If I've missed something please explain as it will help with my build.
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a b B Homebuilt system
December 7, 2011 4:26:32 AM

longpig said:
Agree on the fans - especially the front - but don't see the drive problem. Remove mobo? Don't see that at all. Surely just remove the panel for 5.25 & 3.25 external bays, remove the monster GPU for the internal HDD bays - assuming a REALLY big card. If I've missed something please explain as it will help with my build.


Well, since you need to screw in the hard drive or DVD drive from both the left and right sides in order to hold it in place ... that means you have to remove both side panels of the case to get at it. The side panel with the fans on it is easy, but the other panel may or may not be.

If they're smart, they built the case so that the motherboard screws onto a raised area that isn't attached to the actual side panel of the computer. That way, you remove that panel and the motherboard stays in place, and there's an access hole that lets you fit a screwdriver to the drive bay. Easy.

If they're dumb, they built the case so that the motherboard assembly is attached to the panel, so in order to move the panel you have to remove the motherboard or bring the motherboard with it. So at the very least, you have to unplug all your cards, cables, etc. Maybe not remove the motherboard entirely, but unplug and replug everything at least, which easily quadruples the amount of time you spend, and really increases the odds of slipping and breaking something. I hate cases like that; hate 'em; hate 'em. They definitely make them that way, especially the cheap ones.
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December 7, 2011 5:44:43 AM

Best answer selected by @ Home Pc Builder.
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December 7, 2011 7:08:30 PM

capt_taco said:
Well, since you need to screw in the hard drive or DVD drive from both the left and right sides in order to hold it in place ... that means you have to remove both side panels of the case to get at it. The side panel with the fans on it is easy, but the other panel may or may not be.

If they're smart, they built the case so that the motherboard screws onto a raised area that isn't attached to the actual side panel of the computer. That way, you remove that panel and the motherboard stays in place, and there's an access hole that lets you fit a screwdriver to the drive bay. Easy.

If they're dumb, they built the case so that the motherboard assembly is attached to the panel, so in order to move the panel you have to remove the motherboard or bring the motherboard with it. So at the very least, you have to unplug all your cards, cables, etc. Maybe not remove the motherboard entirely, but unplug and replug everything at least, which easily quadruples the amount of time you spend, and really increases the odds of slipping and breaking something. I hate cases like that; hate 'em; hate 'em. They definitely make them that way, especially the cheap ones.


Seriously interested by that. I've never seen it, not that I've looked at a lot of cases. But I think as the left panel has thumbscrews it's not the case here.
(No pun intended)
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a b B Homebuilt system
December 8, 2011 2:49:38 AM

longpig said:
Seriously interested by that. I've never seen it, not that I've looked at a lot of cases. But I think as the left panel has thumbscrews it's not the case here.
(No pun intended)


I've actually got not one but two computers right now with this problem, including the one I'm typing on right now. One is an all-acrylic case where the motherboard is on standoffs that actually are part of the side panel. This is a similar case: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

The other was a Fry's OEM case that I reused, and the standoffs were anchored into raised bubbles that had been welded directly to the panel. It did have thumbscrews, on both panels actually; just if you tried to move the panel with the motherboard on it, it wouldn't go anywhere because it was still attached to the rest of the frame, most notably by the graphics card being screwed in.

I've seen a few other cases use the same method as that Fry's case for the standoffs - probably because it's cheaper than attaching a separate sheet of metal to the back-top-bottom of the case. Probably the more common way that this problem comes up, and a sign of a cheap case. I'd be willing to bet it's more common with OEM cases because they figure most people probably aren't going to open it up and do any major screwing around.

But like I said, if the case manufacturer knows what they're doing, this should not be a problem.
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February 23, 2012 1:30:32 AM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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