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Do I need a video/graphics card?

Last response: in Systems
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December 7, 2011 8:36:35 PM

I'm going to be doing some video/photo editing and surfing the web on my computer. I'm not going to be playing games on it. So, do I need to go out and buy a separate graphics card, or will the one that is built into the mobo do fine?


Also, if the mobo I buy has a built in video card, how would I go about putting in a new one? Would I have to take out the integrated video card?

More about : video graphics card

a c 112 U Graphics card
December 7, 2011 8:58:21 PM

For basic tasks, onboard video will be fine. There are some features in photoshop and video editors that take advantage of dedicated gpus, but for general use, you should be fine.

Onboard video is generally not upgradable. But when inside of the cpu(and AMD APU and many Intel cpus) vary from cpu to cpu. so sometimes a new cpu will come with a better built in video card(GMA 3000 vs 2000).
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a b U Graphics card
December 7, 2011 9:01:20 PM

Re the integrated graphics on mobo's, basically, no you can't take it out. The only way to upgrade the integrated graphics is install a dedicated gpu. You don't NEED to upgrade for video/photo editing, but a dedicated gpu, something like a firepro card, will make your editing alot faster. Also, how much ram do you have, more is better with photoshop, and is your psu enough?
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a b U Graphics card
December 7, 2011 9:03:47 PM

xspectrum said:
I'm going to be doing some video/photo editing and surfing the web on my computer. I'm not going to be playing games on it. So, do I need to go out and buy a separate graphics card, or will the one that is built into the mobo do fine?


Also, if the mobo I buy has a built in video card, is there a way to take it out and upgrade it later on?


For the most part it will run fine. It will be a bottleneck if you get into some really heavy duty video editing, there you will need a dedicated GPU later on.

When you do get a GPU, you can disable the onboard video in your motherboard's BIOS with a couple of clicks, that's it.
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