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Is an aftermarket heatsink necessary for non-OCed' CPU?

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March 14, 2012 5:02:13 PM

I'll be using an Intel I7 2600K. I was thinking about the Coolermaster V8.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

This is my first build and I'm a little scared about applying the thermal paste but I want to make this build as efficient as I can.

Reviews said the 2600k gets a lil above average on the heat level and that you should use an aftermarket cooler.

Basically my question is will it increase performance or help anything on a CPU, that I do not plan on overclocking at all. Should I do it or not and is the thermal paste difficult for a new builder?
March 14, 2012 5:34:12 PM

If you are not overclocking then a aftermarket cooler is usually not needed. But if you have the money now, or if the V8 is on sale or something, I think that you should get it.

Even if you do not plan to O.C. it is a reasonably easy thing to do and getting a aftermarket cooler now will open that option for you down the road.

Applying thermal paste is not hard, but it is important that you do it right. There are plenty of guides around the internet that show different techniques. They all, more or less, have the same performance so pick the one that you are most comfortable with and go for it!

Depending on what temperature that your CPU is reaching now, a aftermarket cooler might give you a *slight* improvement, but it will probably not be noticeable.

I am still quite a noob with this sort of stuff, so maybe someone else on here could correct me, or explain it better :) 

Hope this helps!
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March 14, 2012 5:37:22 PM

Hi :) 

No....

All the best Brett :) 
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March 14, 2012 5:39:08 PM

It really depends on several things. Such as, how much airflow will you have in your case. Also, what kind of ambient temperatures you'll be operating your PC in. Will it be in a dusty environment. Will you have multiple graphics cards in your case (this will impede airflow). You can alway run it with the stock cooler and monitor your temps before spending money on an aftermarket cooler. Thermal paste is easier than you think. You'll find guides on how to do it correctly on Tom's.
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March 14, 2012 5:44:19 PM

if not overclocking then the stock cooler is fine

but that cpu is a fantastic overclocker--mine is at 5ghz--so not overclocking it is shamefull :D 

4.5ghz plus should be easy with a decent aftermarket cooler

thats the point of getting a k series cpu--its multiplier unlocked to allow better overclocking

you could have got a cheaper cpu if not intending to overclock
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March 15, 2012 2:15:44 AM

Well I want the K series because I like knowing that if I one day I want to get into over-clocking then the option is there.

I'll be playing alot of games on this computer which is why I'm sort of thinking about the V8 just to help keep the system stay cool while being pushed.

No, I don't think my house is dusty. Haha. I live in south carolina, it's humid here though. I'll be using a GTX 560 running in it with the stock fans that came with the coolermaster scout. I think it has 2 fans, one on top and one near the hard drive bay.

and I've seen many guides on applying thermal paste, a lot of people just say methods besides theirs are wrong so I don't really know which to listen to, haha. The spreading it with a bag on your hand seems the most reasonable one though..
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March 15, 2012 2:46:59 AM

There are different methods depending on the maker. IC DIamond states a pea sized drop in the middle, some say grain of rice in the middle. Artic Silver has different methods for every CPU.

As for the after market, I don't see why not. If you plan to OC in the future, be ready for it. As for the V8, not one of the best overall. Zalman, Thermalright, Proligmatech and Noctua are some of the best right now.

We are going to get the Zalman 12X in and I might just upgrade to it from my 9900Max which I have my 2500K at 4.5GHz with.
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March 15, 2012 4:06:37 AM

IMO, even if you're not overclocking, it is best to keep the temps of your CPU as low as possible. Even if the stock cooler is "sufficient enough", these silicon chips would love to operate at a lower temps. Benefits: longer lifespan, lower case temps, lower risk of overheat (especially since it's summer).

Even a cheaper alternative (Coolermaster Hyper 212+) could cool your chip well enough.

Lower temps, better performance.
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March 15, 2012 7:56:40 PM

I think I am just going to spend the extra money and buy an aftermarket cooler, just to be on the safe side and to have the path to over-clocking ready if I ever choose to do so.

One last question though and that is do you think the V8 will fit on an Asus Maximus IV with Corsair vengeance RAM? This cooler looks massive and a lil worried about that. If it won't can you suggest another cooler that's in the 50 dollar range?
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March 15, 2012 8:07:58 PM

I have the the Intel® Core™ i7-2600K and for the first 4 months that I owned it I was using the stock HSF (heatsink/fan) without overclocking it. I moved to the Cooler Master hyper 212+ with dual fans to allow me to overclock it a little bit. As long as your case has good air flow you should be able to use the stock cooler without any problems as you are not overclocking the Intel Core i7-2600K.


Christian Wood
Intel Enthusiast Team
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March 15, 2012 8:10:51 PM

On the Corsair Vengeance RAM with the heatspreader stands almost 2" so if you are using any type of 3rd party cooler there is a good chance that you will hit the memory. The Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo can adjust the fan to deal with the tall RAM or you can simply buy the low profile Corsair Vengeance memory.


Christian Wood
Intel Enthusiast Team
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March 15, 2012 8:16:05 PM

Impulsez said:
I'll be using an Intel I7 2600K. I was thinking about the Coolermaster V8.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

This is my first build and I'm a little scared about applying the thermal paste but I want to make this build as efficient as I can.

Reviews said the 2600k gets a lil above average on the heat level and that you should use an aftermarket cooler.

Basically my question is will it increase performance or help anything on a CPU, that I do not plan on overclocking at all. Should I do it or not and is the thermal paste difficult for a new builder?


Is this PC build of yours is for gaming? If it's for video rendering, of editing and or video conversion, then i7 2600K is good for it, but if this build is for purely gaming and web browsing and stuff, I suggest you use i5 2500K.
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March 16, 2012 4:24:55 AM

aqe040466 said:
Is this PC build of yours is for gaming? If it's for video rendering, of editing and or video conversion, then i7 2600K is good for it, but if this build is for purely gaming and web browsing and stuff, I suggest you use i5 2500K.


Hmm.. I was under the impression that I would bottleneck with the I5, I am new to this so common mistake, I suppose. So there's no performance difference between the two when it comes to gaming? If so then I'd def buy the 2500k and save a hundred..
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March 16, 2012 11:55:03 AM

Impulsez said:
Hmm.. I was under the impression that I would bottleneck with the I5, I am new to this so common mistake, I suppose. So there's no performance difference between the two when it comes to gaming? If so then I'd def buy the 2500k and save a hundred..


Yeah save a hundred and that hundred I suggest you have to buy an aftermarket CPU cooler(air or liquid), it's a good investment to prolong the lifespan of the CPU specially when you overclock it.
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