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Canon EOS 300D - auto exposure

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May 3, 2005 9:18:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I've used a digital snap shot type camera in the past but am new to
the flip mirror type camera's

There seems to be three main settings for the auto exposure.

Basic auto mode - which turns the camera into a snap shot camera

P - Program AE which turns the camera into a snap shot camera with
more intelligence (and more options)

M -Manual mode where you guess the exposure and the camera tells you
if your correct.

I suspect the most professional or experienced photographers use
either the P or M mode. Is this the case?

The Basic modes such as landscape, close-up, etc seem to be useful if
your in a hurry to photograph something.

Regards Brian
Anonymous
May 3, 2005 9:18:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Brian wrote:

> I've used a digital snap shot type camera in the past but am new to
> the flip mirror type camera's
>
> There seems to be three main settings for the auto exposure.
>
> Basic auto mode - which turns the camera into a snap shot camera
>
> P - Program AE which turns the camera into a snap shot camera with
> more intelligence (and more options)
>
> M -Manual mode where you guess the exposure and the camera tells you
> if your correct.
>
> I suspect the most professional or experienced photographers use
> either the P or M mode. Is this the case?


I moved from 5 years on & snap shot digital (on auto) to a Nikon mirror
flip & all I use is 'A' mode now. 'P' mode is too complicated when I'm
looking at understanding the manual options, Apreture priority seeems
the most meaningful. I definitely needed the green 'A' mode for a while
though!


>
> The Basic modes such as landscape, close-up, etc seem to be useful if
> your in a hurry to photograph something.


Agreed though I've not bothered with those.


--
Paul Furman
http://www.edgehill.net/1
san francisco native plants
Anonymous
May 3, 2005 9:18:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Tue, 03 May 2005 06:18:58 +0100, Brian wrote:

> There seems to be three main settings for the auto exposure.
> Basic auto mode - which turns the camera into a snap shot camera
> P - Program AE which turns the camera into a snap shot camera with more
> intelligence (and more options)
> M -Manual mode where you guess the exposure and the camera tells you if
> your correct.
>
> I suspect the most professional or experienced photographers use either
> the P or M mode. Is this the case?
>
> The Basic modes such as landscape, close-up, etc seem to be useful if
> your in a hurry to photograph something.
>
There are Av & Tv modes as well. I don't know how professionals work, but
I use Av & Tv modes more than any other modes. For landscape & similar
pictures I use Av mode. When picturing moving objects or using a long
lens, I use Tv mode. M mode is particularly useful in difficult lighting
condition as well as for flash photography.

--

Gautam Majumdar

Please send e-mails to gmajumdar@freeuk.com
Related resources
May 3, 2005 9:18:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <ur1e71t7ijag4s92ebrr93t5pr17ls4asu@4ax.com>,
Brian <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote:

>Basic auto mode - which turns the camera into a snap shot camera

It does a pretty good job in a wide range of situations.

>P - Program AE which turns the camera into a snap shot camera with
>more intelligence (and more options)

P mode harkens back to the AE-1P. It's an interesting compromise of
control versus automation, plus it opens up a lot of the really neat
features, like AF point selection, flash compensation, ISO speed, long
list of things.

>M -Manual mode where you guess the exposure and the camera tells you
>if your correct.

That's one way of looking at it. Or maybe you have a proper light
meter, and you know what the exposure should be. Or maybe you need to
do something that the meter would never do for you.


>I suspect the most professional or experienced photographers use
>either the P or M mode. Is this the case?

I'd suspect either the Tv or Av modes to get more use than either of
these.

>The Basic modes such as landscape, close-up, etc seem to be useful if
>your in a hurry to photograph something.

They also seem to do more than meets the eye. There's a lot of
intelligence in the design of this thing, and it will make some
interesting choices if you let it.
Anonymous
May 3, 2005 9:18:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

james wrote:
> >Basic auto mode - which turns the camera into a snap shot camera
> It does a pretty good job in a wide range of situations.
>
> >P - Program AE which turns the camera into a snap shot camera with
> >more intelligence (and more options)
> P mode harkens back to the AE-1P. It's an interesting compromise of
> control versus automation, plus it opens up a lot of the really neat
> features, like AF point selection, flash compensation, ISO speed,
long
> list of things.

My personal grain of salt...

I haven't seen any exposure difference between "green auto" mode and P
mode on my 300D?
So, I generally use P mode, which makes generally good choices (eg
adjusts speed to minimize shake depending on the focal length), AND
gives access to more tuning possibilities (ISO, etc...).
It's not so much an automation mode, because you depend on the exposure
metering *_anyway_* (unless you use another external metering of
course!). Using M mode with the internal metering is really the same as
using Av or Tv and exposure compensation, only less practical imho.
But I still use M mode for flash (the flash does the metering,
actually).

I used Tv / Av / M much more with my former chemical EOS, which had two
dials permanently acessible to tune aperture and speed rapidly (EF-M).
I miss a bit these 2 dials on the 300D...
I also realize I use some kind of Tv/Av exposure in low light : I
adjust the lowest possible ISO to have reasonable speed/aperture with P
mode. Could call it "ISO exposure" ;o?.


To summarize my point of view, don't be too much ashamed to use the P
mode of your 300D. Use M only if you can rely on another metering (an
external one, or the TTL flashmeter), and Av and Tv at your personal
convenience.

Greetings from France,
Nicolas
May 3, 2005 9:18:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
news:ur1e71t7ijag4s92ebrr93t5pr17ls4asu@4ax.com...
> I've used a digital snap shot type camera in the past but am new to
> the flip mirror type camera's
>
> There seems to be three main settings for the auto exposure.
>
> Basic auto mode - which turns the camera into a snap shot camera
>
> P - Program AE which turns the camera into a snap shot camera with
> more intelligence (and more options)
>
> M -Manual mode where you guess the exposure and the camera tells you
> if your correct.
>
> I suspect the most professional or experienced photographers use
> either the P or M mode. Is this the case?
>
> The Basic modes such as landscape, close-up, etc seem to be useful if
> your in a hurry to photograph something.
>
> Regards Brian


Oh Dear.

I suspect you lot need to read your Camera Manuals just a little bit more
than your have done. I assume you can read, or are you getting someone to
send these postings for you?

What you call "A Flip Mirror" Camera does have a proper name.

It might even be mentioned in those instruction books, if you ever manage to
read them.

It is a Single Lens Reflex, SLR, and because these are now available in
Digital the abbreviated (that means a short version) name is Dslr.

There are a lot more than 3 ways of metering with these Cameras, but I am
not going to attempt to write a Basic Guide to Photography for you here.

READ the USER MANUAL which came with the camera, and then try asking
questions, and you may find someone willing to give you some real
assistance.

Meanwhile just stick to the Green Dot settings.

The settings with little pictures of mountains etc, are commonly referred to
as the "Idiot" settings, you are not yet capable of using them.

Roy G
Anonymous
May 3, 2005 10:10:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

> I suspect the most professional or experienced photographers use
> either the P or M mode. Is this the case?

P mode is arguably the best mode to learn about the camera and photography
and aperature and shutter speed. It meters the scene and selects what the
camera algorithms predict for aperature and shutter speed. BUT, you can
easily shift the program (P mode is the "program" mode). That dial behind
the shutter will do that after a half-press. It really is a terrific way to
learn by experimenting. Just my 20 cents, adjusted for inflation.
Anonymous
May 4, 2005 8:57:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In message <xYadnSARmIZAkerfRVn-2Q@speakeasy.net>,
Paul Furman <paul-@-edgehill.net> wrote:

>I moved from 5 years on & snap shot digital (on auto) to a Nikon mirror
>flip & all I use is 'A' mode now. 'P' mode is too complicated when I'm
>looking at understanding the manual options, Apreture priority seeems
>the most meaningful. I definitely needed the green 'A' mode for a while
>though!

To me, it really depends on the lens and the lighting. I usually would
rather have a noisy, under-exposed image than a blurred one, so with
telephotos and/or low-light situations I tend to use Tv mode. With my
10-22mm zoom, on the other hand, I tend to use Av as the shutter speed
is usually least important (unless it is night-time).
--

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
John P Sheehy <JPS@no.komm>
><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
May 4, 2005 1:48:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Roy" <royphoty@iona-guesthouse.co.uk> wrote:

>"Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
>news:ur1e71t7ijag4s92ebrr93t5pr17ls4asu@4ax.com...
>> I've used a digital snap shot type camera in the past but am new to
>> the flip mirror type camera's
>>
>> There seems to be three main settings for the auto exposure.
>>
>> Basic auto mode - which turns the camera into a snap shot camera
>>
>> P - Program AE which turns the camera into a snap shot camera with
>> more intelligence (and more options)
>>
>> M -Manual mode where you guess the exposure and the camera tells you
>> if your correct.
>>
>> I suspect the most professional or experienced photographers use
>> either the P or M mode. Is this the case?
>>
>> The Basic modes such as landscape, close-up, etc seem to be useful if
>> your in a hurry to photograph something.
>>
>> Regards Brian
>
>
>Oh Dear.
>
>I suspect you lot need to read your Camera Manuals just a little bit more
>than your have done. I assume you can read, or are you getting someone to
>send these postings for you?
>
>What you call "A Flip Mirror" Camera does have a proper name.
>
>It might even be mentioned in those instruction books, if you ever manage to
>read them.
>
>It is a Single Lens Reflex, SLR, and because these are now available in
>Digital the abbreviated (that means a short version) name is Dslr.
>
>There are a lot more than 3 ways of metering with these Cameras, but I am
>not going to attempt to write a Basic Guide to Photography for you here.
>
>READ the USER MANUAL which came with the camera, and then try asking
>questions, and you may find someone willing to give you some real
>assistance.
>
>Meanwhile just stick to the Green Dot settings.
>
>The settings with little pictures of mountains etc, are commonly referred to
>as the "Idiot" settings, you are not yet capable of using them.
>
>Roy G
>
>
>
Come on now Roy my intelligence is not that limited!
I'm aware that they are called Single Lens Reflex camera's but could
not think of the correct name at the time of my post so I just said
"flip mirror" so others would understand the type of camera I was
referring to.
I have read the manual twice from cover to cover but many things in
the manual don't go into detail.
I have been taking photos with a 35mm film SLR since the 1970's and
use to belong to a photography club.
It's just trying to get use to a digital SLR causes me to ask
questions and get helpful replies.

Maybe you or someone else can refer me to some web sites that has a
lot of information on digital SLR camera's.
I have also borrows from photography magazines from the library to
gain more knowledge on digital SLR camera's.

Regards Brian
May 4, 2005 1:48:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
news:esrf71duirq3660ejomam7ulgdroe85rb8@4ax.com...
> "Roy" <royphoty@iona-guesthouse.co.uk> wrote:
>
>>"Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
>>news:ur1e71t7ijag4s92ebrr93t5pr17ls4asu@4ax.com...
>>> I've used a digital snap shot type camera in the past but am new to
>>> the flip mirror type camera's
>>>
>>> There seems to be three main settings for the auto exposure.
>>>
-------Big Snip------
>>
>>
> Come on now Roy my intelligence is not that limited!
> I'm aware that they are called Single Lens Reflex camera's but could
> not think of the correct name at the time of my post so I just said
> "flip mirror" so others would understand the type of camera I was
> referring to.
> I have read the manual twice from cover to cover but many things in
> the manual don't go into detail.
> I have been taking photos with a 35mm film SLR since the 1970's and
> use to belong to a photography club.
> It's just trying to get use to a digital SLR causes me to ask
> questions and get helpful replies.
>
> Maybe you or someone else can refer me to some web sites that has a
> lot of information on digital SLR camera's.
> I have also borrows from photography magazines from the library to
> gain more knowledge on digital SLR camera's.
>
> Regards Brian
>
>
Sorry Brian, I did not realise you were nearly as old as me, and old codgers
are allowed to forget names, and be grumpy.

I am still a member of a Camera Club, but regrettably that does not always
signify any knowledge of photography.

The operating system of a Dslr is exactly the same as an AF Film Slr (apart
from the recording medium).

I have only had a Dslr since Jan this year, and until then only ever used my
Non Autofocus Nikon FE on Manual Exposure. That Nikon was the first camera
I ever owned which had a battery compartment.

It is not at all difficult, but perhaps the Handbook for the Rebel is not
quite as good as that of the D70.

Have a look at the review for your camera on
http://www.imaging-resource.com/

They go into much more detail than the handbook, and there is also a forum,
probably with a section dedicated to your camera.

There are basically 3 metering systems

Evaluative - The camera does calculations using many meter segments, and
lookes up scenes in its memory.

Centre Weighted - Most of the Exposure info is taken from the centre of the
scene, but some allowance is made for the edges.

Spot - Fairly small area is metered. But that can be somewhere other than
the centre spot of the VF, usually on the same Spot that the Focus uses.

Then there are "Modes" Auto, Program (Variable), Aperture Priority, Shutter
Priority and Manual. In these Modes some of the above metering systems may
not be available. These allow you to decide how YOU will control the Camera.

Then there are the "Subject Modes", (Idiot Modes), Landscape, Portrait,
Night, Sport, etc. Don't know much, I have never used them and can't be
bothered reading up on them.

My advice would be Centre Weighted Metering and in Program(Variable) for
Daylight and in Manual for Flash or tricky conditions.

Roy G
May 4, 2005 8:53:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Roy" <royphoty@iona-guesthouse.co.uk> wrote:

>
>"Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
>news:esrf71duirq3660ejomam7ulgdroe85rb8@4ax.com...
>> "Roy" <royphoty@iona-guesthouse.co.uk> wrote:
>>
>>>"Brian" <bclark@es.co.nz> wrote in message
>>>news:ur1e71t7ijag4s92ebrr93t5pr17ls4asu@4ax.com...
>>>> I've used a digital snap shot type camera in the past but am new to
>>>> the flip mirror type camera's
>>>>
>>>> There seems to be three main settings for the auto exposure.
>>>>
>-------Big Snip------
>>>
>> Come on now Roy my intelligence is not that limited!
>> I'm aware that they are called Single Lens Reflex camera's but could
>> not think of the correct name at the time of my post so I just said
>> "flip mirror" so others would understand the type of camera I was
>> referring to.
>> I have read the manual twice from cover to cover but many things in
>> the manual don't go into detail.
>> I have been taking photos with a 35mm film SLR since the 1970's and
>> use to belong to a photography club.
>> It's just trying to get use to a digital SLR causes me to ask
>> questions and get helpful replies.
>>
>> Maybe you or someone else can refer me to some web sites that has a
>> lot of information on digital SLR camera's.
>> I have also borrows from photography magazines from the library to
>> gain more knowledge on digital SLR camera's.
>>
>> Regards Brian
>>
>>
>Sorry Brian, I did not realise you were nearly as old as me, and old codgers
>are allowed to forget names, and be grumpy.
>
>I am still a member of a Camera Club, but regrettably that does not always
>signify any knowledge of photography.
>
>The operating system of a Dslr is exactly the same as an AF Film Slr (apart
>from the recording medium).
>
>I have only had a Dslr since Jan this year, and until then only ever used my
>Non Autofocus Nikon FE on Manual Exposure. That Nikon was the first camera
>I ever owned which had a battery compartment.
>
>It is not at all difficult, but perhaps the Handbook for the Rebel is not
>quite as good as that of the D70.
>
>Have a look at the review for your camera on
>http://www.imaging-resource.com/
>
>They go into much more detail than the handbook, and there is also a forum,
>probably with a section dedicated to your camera.
>
>There are basically 3 metering systems
>
>Evaluative - The camera does calculations using many meter segments, and
>lookes up scenes in its memory.
>
>Centre Weighted - Most of the Exposure info is taken from the centre of the
>scene, but some allowance is made for the edges.
>
> Spot - Fairly small area is metered. But that can be somewhere other than
>the centre spot of the VF, usually on the same Spot that the Focus uses.
>
>Then there are "Modes" Auto, Program (Variable), Aperture Priority, Shutter
>Priority and Manual. In these Modes some of the above metering systems may
>not be available. These allow you to decide how YOU will control the Camera.
>
>Then there are the "Subject Modes", (Idiot Modes), Landscape, Portrait,
>Night, Sport, etc. Don't know much, I have never used them and can't be
>bothered reading up on them.
>
>My advice would be Centre Weighted Metering and in Program(Variable) for
>Daylight and in Manual for Flash or tricky conditions.
>
>Roy G
>
>
Thanks Roy for the information. I have not tried Center weighted
metering yet but hope to soon. The good thing about the digital
camera's is that I don't have to waste 35mm film to run some test
shots and I get instant results.
Thanks also for the web site.

Regards Brian
!