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PSU testing

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a b ) Power supply
March 15, 2012 5:19:11 PM

I have a Silverstone Strider SST-ST1000 that I got from a friend that won't power on. I was wondering if there is a way to test it and any tutorials that are known for possibly repairing it? It's out of warranty, so I don't mind pulling it apart. There isn't so much as a dust bunny on the leading fan edge, so I can't imagine it had any or very little use.

I plan on using a multimeter to test if power is being supplied out the computer side, but other than that don't know what I should be testing. I got the pin out 'diagram' (if you want to call it that from Silverstone's complete CRAP support email), so I know at least what pins should be providing what voltage. I also know the cables are good, they were bought new on newegg (set PP05) and they work on an identical ST-1000 I have.

Thanks in advance for any info, ideas or links that can be provided. I really hate to throw a $175 PSU into the recycle bin... :-/

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Best solution

March 15, 2012 7:39:12 PM

Take it apart, see if fuses are blown. If it has a manual 120/240V whatever switch, make sure it is set to the correct voltage.

Capacitors are what normally fail on a power supply, however you need a special tester for those and it normally requires unsoldering them first. Pins on all recent power supplies are standard ATX12V type (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_supply_unit_%28compu...). Shorting pin 16-17 should power it on (put a jumper wire in from the green wire to the black wire in the connector).

That being said, if you take it apart (with the power off) and don't find a blown fuse, don't mess with it. Unless you have done home wiring before, 120V is not something to be trifled with. Unless you have your defib handy.

The only other easy thing is to look for cracked solder joints, reheat with a soldering iron and a dab of fluxed solder.
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a b ) Power supply
March 15, 2012 7:47:47 PM

Defib, NICE!! Someone has some medical terminology under their belt. Made me laugh harder than any other crack I've seen here in some time!! Haha I'll take a look at wiki and see if anyone else has comments.

I got the 'booklet' for the PSU that has all the modular connections and such. I was hoping that if the thing is getting power, maybe the EPS 8 pin for example has some loose connection or some planet aligned with a wrong star and I luck out. Never know I guess.

Think if I took this to an electrician or someone in that field, they would have any luck with it or do I need a 'computer tech' with his EE degree?
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March 16, 2012 12:24:25 PM

If you don't mind spending $15,

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I've never used one, it has good reviews though.

Computer power supplies are technically quite simple for someone that is into electronics. A regular electrician would have no clue, most of them that do standard building wiring are only worried about how many amps a wire is carrying, what percentage to derate when you have x number of cables in a conduit, % voltage drop over a distance, etc....

If you find an electrician who wanted to get an EE or actually has one, he may be able to figure it out. Or a tech guy with an EE degree or electronics hobbyist. But they should be your friend so you get it done for free because if you have to pay someone to test it it will rapidly exceed the price of the unit. When I took my A+ cert for pc repair back in, uh, 1995? we had to know how to fix laser printers (test had questions on what a ground symbol meant, etc..) but nothing to do with power supply internals.

As i said, simplest thing is short green to black, if it doesn't come on, disconnect, check fuses. Beyond that, make sure someone is near you to jumpstart if necessary.
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a b ) Power supply
March 17, 2012 8:39:06 PM

Your wiki link didn't work, but I found it.

I shorted 16/17 and nothing, so apart it comes. I was able to take my other Silverstone I got from the same dude at the same time and short 16/17 and used a voltmeter to test all the outputs and they were all right on volt spec, so now I got at least one nice fully functional Silverstone. Thanks for the link and how to short without a mobo involvement.

The PSU tester looks kinda cool, I might get one and do some self education to learn how to rebilud or repair PSUs, we have no one around here (smaller town) that does it. Maybe I can make a buck or two, haha

Anyway, thanks ngoy, especially since you were the only one that replied. There seems at time to be a lot of 'experts' on here, but rarely when you ask a technical question do you get pointed in the right way by someone who actually has a clue!!

Cheers!
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a b ) Power supply
March 17, 2012 8:40:10 PM

Best answer selected by scottiemedic.
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March 19, 2012 8:51:27 PM

scottiemedic said:
Your wiki link didn't work, but I found it.

...
Anyway, thanks ngoy, especially since you were the only one that replied. There seems at time to be a lot of 'experts' on here, but rarely when you ask a technical question do you get pointed in the right way by someone who actually has a clue!!

Cheers!


You are welcome! My experience comes at the expense of being zapped by bad wiring more than once. That and I used to be an electronics hobbyist for lack of a better term. Breadboard stuff, never moved on to etching my own pcb's though. Good luck on fixing the old psu!
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