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Gaming Monior 24" IPS

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October 17, 2011 4:14:30 PM

hello,

Im looking for 24" monitor for gaming, mostly playing MOBA and MMORPG for ex. Heroes of Newerth, Rift. Im not playing any FPS games. I was wondering if IPS display would be better for me. Could you recommend me any good monitor? Thanks

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a b U Graphics card
a b 4 Gaming
a b C Monitor
October 17, 2011 4:38:46 PM

Hello Danny_k;

What's your budget for the monitor?
October 17, 2011 4:50:45 PM

I was thinking 250-300$ dont want to spend lots of money for a display. Unless its really worth it.
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October 17, 2011 4:50:49 PM

I was thinking 250-300$ dont want to spend lots of money for a display. Unless its really worth it.
a b U Graphics card
a b 4 Gaming
a b C Monitor
October 17, 2011 4:57:57 PM

I should have waited a few more minutes before posting the Dell Ultrasharps.

There are some entry level IPS monitors in your range - and maybe an MVA panel or two which is also a step up from the usual TN.
a b U Graphics card
a b 4 Gaming
a b C Monitor
October 17, 2011 5:06:17 PM

1 MVA LCD and 4 E-IPS LCDs in your budget range.
The NewEgg customer comments should give you enough clues to choose one over the others.
October 17, 2011 5:13:40 PM

I think 500$ is a little too much for a monitor id like to spend like 250$ or even sell if i could, maybe Dell 2412 is the option for me?
October 17, 2011 5:16:53 PM

Ah i havent notice the newegg comparison. Do you think its worth to to buy that Dell 2412? Or maybe i should just take one of those from the newegg comparison that you gave me?
a b U Graphics card
a b 4 Gaming
a b C Monitor
October 17, 2011 11:48:13 PM

The Dell has the same E-IPS type panel as those others at NewEgg.
You can compare features and things like warranty period.
I have to put in a plug for having a USB hub on the monitor. After several year of having that capability I'll never own another monitor without it.

Here is a review of the Dell UltraSharp U2412M 24-inch LCD Monitor

If you can find reviews on the other models for comparison it might help lock down your best option.
October 18, 2011 12:26:44 AM

I researched an ips panel heavily before buying one. I ended up with the nec 23" ips: ea23wmi. Color accuracy and build quality is higher than the ultrasharps, the latter of which suffer from color uniformity across the screen. In other words, you may have a grey background all across but one side will be darker than the other. The ultrasharps also use a lot of anti glare coating
.. too much. I suggest looking at the hardOCP forums if you want to look more into it. They have very in depth threads on all IPSs. Another point in the NEC's favor is the ability to hit 80+hz over display port. I was able to get mine shipped from amazon for 260 with no dead pixels, great color uniformity and very little backlight bleed compared to some ultrasharps I've seen. Every time I have people over, they comment on how nice my screen looks. "Wow it looks like looking through a window!" "Your background looks so real!" etc etc. It's nice. =] Nothing compares to a calibrated IPS display. I can no longer stand black crush and poor greys that tn panels display so profusely. I'm sure you will enjoy your IPS when you get one too.

ps look into return policies before you buy. Some shaft you on dead pixels and other defects. Make sure you can count on your store to give you the goods and take them back if they aren't up to your standards. I love Newegg but they have a terrible monitor policy. Consider brick+mortar or amazon.

pps wr2 is right. A lot of IPSs share the same panel. w
What differs is backlight, build quality+construction, and extra features. Let us know what you go with! Sorry if my reply is f***ed up, typing on my phone.
a b U Graphics card
a b 4 Gaming
a b C Monitor
October 18, 2011 5:01:49 AM

The NEC EA232WMi in the NewEgg link is the successor to the NEC EA231WMi jesh4622 mentions.

As far as I know all e-IPS monitors run the chance of having screen color uniformity and backlight bleeding issues - including EA231WMi/EA232WMi. See the review comments here: NEC EA232WMi review
October 18, 2011 12:43:58 PM

So when i get my monitor with IPS panel i need to calibrate it? How do i do it? Is it software or hardware setting? Im not going to look at high def. pictures just gaming, films etc. 0 graphics.
a b U Graphics card
a b 4 Gaming
a b C Monitor
October 18, 2011 1:22:42 PM

For the professionals that earn a living based on work done on a monitor calibration can be very important.
For the rest of us calibration is not a requirement - it's entirely optional. Calibration is mostly done with a hardware device and specialized software.
You can enjoy your monitor right out of the box.
a b U Graphics card
a b 4 Gaming
a b C Monitor
October 18, 2011 1:36:03 PM

The TFTCentral website has a tool that will suggest a monitor based on your requirements: http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/selector.htm
It's pretty 'euro-centric' but it might be useful to try it out.
Try plugging in the following (and you can my suggestions any way you like):
Price: £200 - 300
Screen size: try it with both 22-23" and 24" choices
Wide screen: Don't mind (allows for both 16:9 and 16.10 options)
Aspect ratio: Don't mind
Panel tech: IPS (you can also try with TN or one of the others)
Color space: No preference
Primary use: Gaming or Movies / TV / Video
Secondary use: Gaming or Movies / TV / Video
Viewing angles: It won't matter
Extra functionality: Not bothered

To get the NEC EA232WMi to show up in the recommendation list change the Primary and Secondary use choices to leave out gaming (use Movies and Office / Internet for example) when looking for 22-23" suggestions.
I think that means TFT Central isn't recommending EA232WMi for gaming.

edit;
When you read the actual EA232WMi review and look under the Responsiveness and Gaming section they mention:
"The EA232WMi should be ok for some moderate gaming but those wanting to play fast FPS may want to look elsewhere ...."
I make that out to say it would probably be suitable for your RPG/MMORPG type games.
a b U Graphics card
October 18, 2011 2:06:43 PM

Unfortunately IPS panel monitors are all near about $500. Even i am planning for an IPS monitor for a long time. Haven't really saved enough to get one. :( 
a c 364 U Graphics card
a b 4 Gaming
a c 195 C Monitor
October 18, 2011 4:06:31 PM

Some info about e-IPS panels...

The majority of e-IPS panels are 6-bit panels which are similar to TN panels. This is done to reduce costs, but the side effect is less color accuracy since 6-bit panels can only produce 256k actual colors. Through a process generally called temporal dithering, around 16m colors can be "blended up"; 8-bit panels can produce 16.7m actual colors. for most people 6-bit panels are fine, but anyone who requires color accuracy should look at 8-bit panels (VA and other IPS panels). 6-bit panels tends to have color banding issues when there are fine color gradients. Some general image artificats might appear here and there, but you'll only notice if you know what to look for. I think these issues are less noticable on an e-IPS panel though.

Last time I've checked, there are only 2 e-IPS panel models that are actually 8-bit panels. The older NEC EA231WMi supposedly has an 8-bit e-IPS panel. When compared side by side against the Dell U2311h which is confirmed to have a 6-bit e-IPS panel, the NEC EA231WMi seemed to have few color banding issues and color distortions. All e-IPS panels that have LED backlight are 6-bit panels (including the NEC EA232WMi) based on the latest panel specs released by LG Display who is the only e-IPS panel manufacturer.

The 1st generation e-IPS panel all basically had 8ms response times; decent for general usage an casual gaming, but most hardcore gamers prefer 2ms or 5ms response time TN panel monitors. Some of the current 2nd generation e-IPS seem to have 6ms response times which is inline with the more expensive H-IPS / S-IPS / P-IPS panels. 6ms is definitely good for gaming because I play games on my NEC LCD2690WUXi monitor which uses a H-IPS panel. My Planar PX2611w (H-IPS panel) is rated at 5ms, but I only use that as a secondary monitor. NEC's e-IPS monitors ( NEC EA231WMi and NEC EA232WMi) tends to lack response time acceleration which explains why their response times are listed as 14ms and why they are not recommended for fast action 1st person shooters.

The e-IPS panel was designed to compete against TN panels which are inexpensive to manufacture. The distinct advantage of e-IPS over TN is the wider viewing angles which means less color shifting / fading when you move your head around. It also can provide slightly better color accuracy even though it still is a 6-bit panel. I may have even seen a few e-IPS panels monitors that were rated as fast as 5ms, but that's probably due to aggresive response time acceleration settings. The downside is e-IPS panel monitors are slightly more expensive than the average TN panel monitor and they are not as fast as 2ms TN panel monitors.

Regarding color cablibration, all monitors needs calibration especially if accurate colors are extremely important. For best results a colorimeter (hardware) is required and the really good ones can cost up to $300 (the price of some low end monitors), but they generally start at around $60. There is also the manual way of doing things, nowhere near as accurate, but it is free. Websites like Lagom can help:

http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/

Dell generally ships their monitors pre-calibrated, so out of the box the colors are generally good and for those people who do not require extremely acurate colors that save them money. However, in situations where color accuracy is important, then buying a colorimeter is still highly recommended.
October 18, 2011 4:34:41 PM

Do you think Dell U2412M would be the best choice for such amount of money?
a c 364 U Graphics card
a b 4 Gaming
a c 195 C Monitor
October 18, 2011 6:43:40 PM

You will ultimately have to decide that for yourself. Here's 3 reviews that can help you out. If you want read one of them in detail, but I suggest you skip down to the end where the reviewers provide their conclusion.

http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/dell_u2412m.htm

http://www.flatpanelshd.com/review.php?subaction=showfu...

http://www.pcmonitors.org/monitor-reviews/dell-u2412m


In my opinion, the monitor should suit your needs unless you are a hardcore gamer that wants the fastest monitors (lowest response times), or you are a graphic artist were high color accuracy is a requirement.
October 18, 2011 7:32:25 PM

Nope as i said in the 1st post im hardcore gamer though i play only MMORPG and MOBA games such as dota2, heroes of enwerth, rift, lineage, wow etc (wating for tera, d3):) . Im not an graphic artist nor any movie designer I just want to buy a new monitor that suits my needs. I never used IPS, PVA, SPVA or any high end display. Just regular TN, CRT monitors. Althought my PC is high end performancewise. I play most of the time and watch movies (BR if i can). Zero graphics, pictures. Just pure gaming, movie section.

Edit: Forgot to mention that im not playing any FPS games which needs very fast response times.
a c 217 U Graphics card
a b 4 Gaming
a c 133 C Monitor
October 18, 2011 11:00:27 PM

I might recommend getting a 120hz TN monitor for your use. At 120hz, things appear a lot sharper, and when you see a lot of fast action, such as spinning around your direction, it is a lot smoother than with 60hz monitors (assuming you have the power to display higher than 60 FPS).

I find if you play PvP on a MMO, fast response is still important, but not as important as a FPS. In either case, since color accuracy isn't important, I'd think smoothness would become more important for your use.
October 19, 2011 12:17:06 AM

By power to display you mean graphic card or power supply?:)  Ive got gtx 470 and 750W power supply. Which monitors would you recommend then? with 120mhz refresh rate?
a c 217 U Graphics card
a b 4 Gaming
a c 133 C Monitor
October 19, 2011 12:41:08 AM

I mean overall performance of the system. If you find yourself getting much higher than 60hz with v-sync off, then you'd see smoother animation with the 120hz monitor.
a b U Graphics card
October 19, 2011 8:26:44 AM

jaguarskx said:
Some info about e-IPS panels...

The majority of e-IPS panels are 6-bit panels which are similar to TN panels. This is done to reduce costs, but the side effect is less color accuracy since 6-bit panels can only produce 256k actual colors. Through a process generally called temporal dithering, around 16m colors can be "blended up"; 8-bit panels can produce 16.7m actual colors. for most people 6-bit panels are fine, but anyone who requires color accuracy should look at 8-bit panels (VA and other IPS panels). 6-bit panels tends to have color banding issues when there are fine color gradients. Some general image artificats might appear here and there, but you'll only notice if you know what to look for. I think these issues are less noticable on an e-IPS panel though.

Last time I've checked, there are only 2 e-IPS panel models that are actually 8-bit panels. The older NEC EA231WMi supposedly has an 8-bit e-IPS panel. When compared side by side against the Dell U2311h which is confirmed to have a 6-bit e-IPS panel, the NEC EA231WMi seemed to have few color banding issues and color distortions. All e-IPS panels that have LED backlight are 6-bit panels (including the NEC EA232WMi) based on the latest panel specs released by LG Display who is the only e-IPS panel manufacturer.

The 1st generation e-IPS panel all basically had 8ms response times; decent for general usage an casual gaming, but most hardcore gamers prefer 2ms or 5ms response time TN panel monitors. Some of the current 2nd generation e-IPS seem to have 6ms response times which is inline with the more expensive H-IPS / S-IPS / P-IPS panels. 6ms is definitely good for gaming because I play games on my NEC LCD2690WUXi monitor which uses a H-IPS panel. My Planar PX2611w (H-IPS panel) is rated at 5ms, but I only use that as a secondary monitor. NEC's e-IPS monitors ( NEC EA231WMi and NEC EA232WMi) tends to lack response time acceleration which explains why their response times are listed as 14ms and why they are not recommended for fast action 1st person shooters.

The e-IPS panel was designed to compete against TN panels which are inexpensive to manufacture. The distinct advantage of e-IPS over TN is the wider viewing angles which means less color shifting / fading when you move your head around. It also can provide slightly better color accuracy even though it still is a 6-bit panel. I may have even seen a few e-IPS panels monitors that were rated as fast as 5ms, but that's probably due to aggresive response time acceleration settings. The downside is e-IPS panel monitors are slightly more expensive than the average TN panel monitor and they are not as fast as 2ms TN panel monitors.

Regarding color cablibration, all monitors needs calibration especially if accurate colors are extremely important. For best results a colorimeter (hardware) is required and the really good ones can cost up to $300 (the price of some low end monitors), but they generally start at around $60. There is also the manual way of doing things, nowhere near as accurate, but it is free. Websites like Lagom can help:

http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/

Dell generally ships their monitors pre-calibrated, so out of the box the colors are generally good and for those people who do not require extremely acurate colors that save them money. However, in situations where color accuracy is important, then buying a colorimeter is still highly recommended.


This is as detailed as it can be! :) 

eIPS panels are cheaper. I was looking at Dell's website and the specs, they have a lot of IPS panel monitors.
One more thing is that the response times that are given on the spec sheet are mostly G2G... pure IPS panel monitors have a lot higher response times for even G2G. Older IPS panel monitors had >8ms response times.
October 19, 2011 9:38:45 AM

My PC should handle 120mhz display. Which models would you recommend?
!