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How to install windows 7 on the second computer or

Last response: in Windows 7
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December 30, 2011 6:12:46 PM

Hi, usually when buying a Windows installation CD or DVD (like Windows 7 Ultimate for instant), it is a one time installtion CD, that mean you are just allowed to install the Windows on only one computer.

My question is that in case must format the computer and reinstall it again, is it possible?

Or you build another computer and want to use that Windows (the one you had already installed in the old computer) to install onto the new machine you just build ( this is like you upgrade you studio), is it possible to do that or you must buy another Windows installation CD?

All of your reply to my Do not post your @mail, u will be automatically notified if some one post fresh line in your thread. Thanx : )

Tri
December 30, 2011 6:33:22 PM

don't put your e-mail addy in posts unless you want spam...

if it's a full retail copy you are allowed to move it from system to system as long as it is removed from the first system before installing it on the second.

I believe OEM copies are restricted to one install per the EULA

I'm not going to give you more than the legal answers, but you could always use google for the other answers.
December 30, 2011 6:38:27 PM

You can install or reinstall from the DVD as many times as you want, it is the ACTIVATION that is limited by your license.

If you buy an OEM version of the OS, you can only activate it on one machine. You can reinstall as many times as you want on this same machine, you can upgrade this same machine to some extent and reinstall, but at some point Microsoft will consider that you have built a new machine and won't let you activate any more. The exception would be if your old motherboard dies and you have to install a new motherboard, then you could talk them into letting you activate again. If you just install a new motherboard because you feel like it, I don't think that is allowed.

If you buy the full version of the OS, you can install, reinstall, and activate as many times as you want, as long as you don't have it installed and activated on 2 machines at the same time. So you could build a machine, install and activate, then when you get tired of that one you could throw it away, build a new one, and install and activate the same OS on the new machine.
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December 30, 2011 6:41:27 PM

so by your logic... i can install my copy of windows onto 30 different machines as long as I don't activate it... good to know

Too bad MS doesn't see it your way (emphasis mine)

2. INSTALLATION AND USE RIGHTS.
a. One Copy per Computer. Except as allowed in Section 2 (b) below, you may install one copy of the software on one computer. That computer is the “licensed computer.”

17. TRANSFER TO ANOTHER COMPUTER.
a. Software Other than Windows Anytime Upgrade. You may transfer the software and install it on another computer for your use. That computer becomes the licensed computer. You may not do so to share this license between computers.
b. Windows Anytime Upgrade Software. You may transfer the software and install it on another computer, but only if the license terms of the software you upgraded from allows you to do so. That computer becomes the licensed computer. You may not do so to share this license between computers.

18. TRANSFER TO A THIRD PARTY.
a. Software Other Than Windows Anytime Upgrade. The first user of the software may make a one time transfer of the software and this agreement, by transferring the original media, the certificate of authenticity, the product key and the proof of purchase directly to a third party. The first user must remove the software before transferring it separately from the computer. The first user may not retain any copies of the software.
b. Windows Anytime Upgrade Software. You may transfer the software directly to a third party only with the licensed computer. You may not keep any copies of the software or any earlier edition.
c. Other Requirements. Before any permitted transfer, the other party must agree that this agreement applies to the transfer and use of the software.

in case you're curious about the reference to section 2 (b)... 2 (b) is about how you get three copies with the family pack... i didn't include it cause it's not relevant...
December 31, 2011 12:30:46 AM

slhpss said:
so by your logic... i can install my copy of windows onto 30 different machines as long as I don't activate it... good to know



I'm not a lawyer and I don't play one on TV. And those 30 copies that you install will only run for 30 days.
a b $ Windows 7
December 31, 2011 12:46:35 AM

Quote:
If you buy an OEM version of the OS, you can only activate it on one machine. You can reinstall as many times as you want on this same machine, you can upgrade this same machine to some extent and reinstall, but at some point Microsoft will consider that you have built a new machine and won't let you activate any more.


Slhpss, don't read what he didn't write. I thought his answer was a good one, and no where did he say to install it on more then one machine. I don't see how what he wrote is any different then what you posted from MS EULA.
a b $ Windows 7
December 31, 2011 12:59:40 AM

You can install it on 30 different machines.....

It would be considered a trial on those 30, and after 30 days the software will cease to function unless you activate it.... once you activate one, MS has you. If you activate 30 different machines, MS will reject the activation for 29 of those machines...
December 31, 2011 2:39:05 AM

Quote:
You can install or reinstall from the DVD as many times as you want, it is the ACTIVATION that is limited by your license.


maybe you SHOULD read what he DID write... and then read the license... which I posted excerpts from.... it clearly says install which I kindly bolded...
December 31, 2011 2:47:41 AM

cadder said:
I'm not a lawyer and I don't play one on TV. And those 30 copies that you install will only run for 30 days.


4. MANDATORY ACTIVATION.
Activation associates the use of the software with a specific computer. During activation, the software will send information about the software and the computer to Microsoft. This information includes the version, language and product key of the software, the Internet protocol address of the computer, and information derived from the hardware configuration of the computer. For more information, see go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?Linkid=104609. By using the software, you consent to the transmission of this information. If properly licensed, you have the right to use the version of the software installed during the installation process up to the time permitted for activation. Unless the software is activated, you have no right to use the software after the time permitted for activation. This is to prevent its unlicensed use. You are not permitted to bypass or circumvent activation. If the computer is connected to the Internet, the software may automatically connect to Microsoft for activation. You can also activate the software manually by Internet or telephone. If you do so, Internet and telephone service charges may apply. Some changes to your computer components or the software may require you to reactivate the software. The software will remind you to activate it until you do.

the bolded section in normal people words... if you OS is installed on more than one system... then it is not properly licensed... and your 30 days is still illegal

Everyone should really read and understand what they agree to when using software... especially since in most cases involving software you DON'T own the software you own a license to use it, and if you don't follow the EULA often that license can be revoked
a b $ Windows 7
December 31, 2011 2:54:14 AM

Again, where did he write you could install it on more then one machine? Would you like some more bolding help?

Quote:
If you buy an OEM version of the OS, you can only activate it on one machine. You can reinstall as many times as you want on this same machine, you can upgrade this same machine to some extent and reinstall, but at some point Microsoft will consider that you have built a new machine and won't let you activate any more.

If you buy the full version of the OS, you can install, reinstall, and activate as many times as you want, as long as you don't have it installed and activated on 2 machines at the same time. So you could build a machine, install and activate, then when you get tired of that one you could throw it away, build a new one, and install and activate the same OS on the new machine.


You are seriously making a mountain out of nothing. He never said you could use it on 30 different machines. He always said one. The only think I have an issue with is he said "full version" when I assume he meant retail. The OEM/upgrade version is "full".

Edit: Only thing rather, not only think.
December 31, 2011 3:17:17 AM

like I said... as long as you don't have it "installed and activated" is incorrect.... even having it installed on more than one machine whether or not it is activated is against the EULA... and here's the deal... someone comes in here asking for information don't give him crap that you think do some research and then tell him something you know... especially when it becomes an issue of legality
a b $ Windows 7
December 31, 2011 3:39:34 AM

If you buy a legit version and for some reason have to re-install it and if it does not activate; you can call MS and explain the circumstance. In my past experience they have always allowed the new activation. An example is when I rebuilt a pc for a client and had to use a new MB (the old one failed). Different model and brand. One call to MS and problem solved.
a b $ Windows 7
December 31, 2011 3:53:01 AM

Slhpss, last time then I'm done feeding you. Where did he say its ok to install on as many machines as you want as long as you don't activate it?
December 31, 2011 4:14:58 PM

I've already quoted it several times... if you have a weak grasp on the English language than that's on you.

if anyone is trolling it's you I was simply pointing out that the license is for the install not the activation... which is why actually quoted the source... the Microsoft End User License Agreement for windows 7... full disclosure I quoted the retail version because I agree with his point about the OEM version.
a b $ Windows 7
January 1, 2012 1:43:05 AM

In which case I believe I've made my point.

Good day sir.

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January 1, 2012 1:51:24 AM
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Now guys, let's not get too carried away with this. I don't think the subject warrants a big battle.

The EULA has a lot of words in it, but I think the practical meaning is pretty much what I wrote in my original response. And I said CAN which might be different from MAY. MS isn't going to send a team of lawyers to your house to make sure you comply with every single word. You CAN install on 30 machines, whether MS likes it or not is a different story but also somewhat academic because they aren't likely to know about it until you start trying to activate more than one of them. And they used to have a provision for trial installations which is why there is a 30 day period before you have to activate.
a b $ Windows 7
January 1, 2012 4:06:51 AM

This topic has been closed by Pyree
a b $ Windows 7
January 1, 2012 4:15:42 AM

Best answer selected by Pyree.
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