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Need advise on a Computer build I'm a newbie be easy!

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December 16, 2011 8:36:25 PM

I'm trying to figure out what stuff i will be needing for this, My son likes playing WoW and I put together a very old ibm and made it work but the graphics are so terrible i just cant stand it anymore lol.. I noticed on there visuals screen that you need certian things to run the best setting and thats what im shooting for..Price is not a very big issue but cut me alittle slack. Also i want to make it look cool for my son i seen water cooling is the new big thing i think ill be going that route.. Thanks!
a c 92 B Homebuilt system
a b Ý World of Warcraft
December 16, 2011 8:46:18 PM

Quote:
My son likes playing WoW and I put together a very old ibm and made it work but the graphics are so terrible i just cant stand it anymore lol..


Is there a spec sheet for this system? I'd be curious to know what it runs on that will make it run WOW but have terrible graphics.

Quote:
I noticed on there visuals screen that you need certian things to run the best setting and thats what im shooting for..


What OS are you running? I'm not sure what you are talking about here.

Quote:
Also i want to make it look cool for my son i seen water cooling is the new big thing i think ill be going that route..


If you're new to building a system I would heavily advise against water cooling. The parts needed are expensive, very complicated to setup and there's way too many things that can go wrong when setting it up. If you're new to system building air cooling is the way to go. You might be able to get away with a closed block setup like the Corsair H80, H100, or Antec Kuhler, but I would not recommend a custom setup for a first-time system. And with computers, as with cars or your house, it's *NEVER* a good idea to buy something because it "looks the coolest". You want the best hardware you can get for your budget, and what I like to call "vanity" hardware is never a good sell.

Fill this out and I can help you pick out some good parts better: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261222-31-build-advic...

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December 16, 2011 8:53:52 PM

I dont know how to find the spec sheet but it really is dirt old and everything on the WoW is set as low as it goes and it still lags not due to internet. Also im the type of person who would rather read a book or article on how to do something so water cooling is not out of the question i can build dang near anything i set my mind to.. Perks of being old :)  Also i dont know anything at all i take it OS is the operating system?
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Related resources
a c 92 B Homebuilt system
a b Ý World of Warcraft
December 16, 2011 9:13:25 PM

Quote:
I dont know how to find the spec sheet but it really is dirt old and everything on the WoW is set as low as it goes and it still lags not due to internet.


Well if you're using Windows XP hit windows + pause and it will bring up a system properties dialogue that will show you what CPU, RAM and video card. If you're using Windows 7 using the same keys will bring up the "about system" control panel that will have much more detailed information, you can post it from there.

Quote:
Also im the type of person who would rather read a book or article on how to do something so water cooling is not out of the question i can build dang near anything i set my mind to.. Perks of being old :) 


I've been building / tweaking PCs since I was 15 (I'm 31 now so I have quite a bit of experience at this... :lol:  ) and I still wouldn't recommend it - it's too much time and planning for not a little payoff. Having a CPU with +-.2 GHz isn't going to make the biggest difference in the world for modern games like Skyrim, BF3, and so on. Intel's Sandy Bridge line is very efficient in its' cooling system and the big, huge coolers like what were required several years ago are becoming a thing of the past. Especially since like I said there's tons of things that could go wrong, and you don't want to take a chance on ruining your new hardware that you just spent $1500 - $3K on. You're better off by going with a good, strong air cooled system to start with. You can get a case that has mounts and everything for a custom liquid cooling setup, but I think for now you're better off sticking with a strong air cooled system or a closed block liquid setup. Here's a couple of articles from the main page of Tom's on the subject I would highly suggest reading before attempting a liquid cooled system.

Setting up air cooling pt. 1: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/cooling-airflow-hea...
Setting up air cooling pt. 2: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/cooling-air-pressur...
Self contained liquid coolers - Antec Kuhler vs. Corsair H80/H100: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/h2o-h80-h100-benchm...
Air cooling vs. liquid cooling: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/coolit-domino-cogag...

If you insist on going the liquid cooled route getting a closed block system like the Corsair H100 certainly wouldn't be a bad way to go. I'm actually planning to get one for my home system in the near future.

Quote:
Also i dont know anything at all i take it OS is the operating system?


Yes.
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December 16, 2011 9:47:23 PM

TreyC said:
I'm trying to figure out what stuff i will be needing for this, My son likes playing WoW and I put together a very old ibm and made it work but the graphics are so terrible i just cant stand it anymore lol.. I noticed on there visuals screen that you need certian things to run the best setting and thats what im shooting for..Price is not a very big issue but cut me alittle slack. Also i want to make it look cool for my son i seen water cooling is the new big thing i think ill be going that route.. Thanks!


If price is an issue, get a AMD Phenom II X4 955 Black Edition 3.2GHz for around $140. Get a GTX 460 for around $180. Get a $130 motherboard that fits the AMD. Get a corsair tower case, Corsair Carbide Series 400R Mid Tower $100. Ram and hard drive for $150 total. If you want, for $15-20 you can get neon lights and put that in your tower. If the corsair doesn't let you see inside, go get another one. Get the corsair H70 water cooler, or equivalent for about $70. Get a corsair PSU $60 or so. That will be more then enough for WOW to be played at max settings.

If you want something even better, get a Intel i7-2600 for $300. Plus get a nice sound card. Motherboard sound cards are okay for WOW but when the battles get heavy, mine has trouble. Hard to describe but I think it has to do with the limited amount of channels.

Anyways, for about $700-1000 you can get a good one. Oh, and don't forget the $99 Windows 7 OEM installation disc. And if your kid uses Microsoft Office for school, that is another $100.



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December 16, 2011 9:47:42 PM

TreyC said:
I'm trying to figure out what stuff i will be needing for this, My son likes playing WoW and I put together a very old ibm and made it work but the graphics are so terrible i just cant stand it anymore lol.. I noticed on there visuals screen that you need certian things to run the best setting and thats what im shooting for..Price is not a very big issue but cut me alittle slack. Also i want to make it look cool for my son i seen water cooling is the new big thing i think ill be going that route.. Thanks!


If price is an issue, get a AMD Phenom II X4 955 Black Edition 3.2GHz for around $140. Get a GTX 460 for around $180. Get a $130 motherboard that fits the AMD. Get a corsair tower case, Corsair Carbide Series 400R Mid Tower $100. Ram and hard drive for $150 total. If you want, for $15-20 you can get neon lights and put that in your tower. If the corsair doesn't let you see inside, go get another one. Get the corsair H70 water cooler, or equivalent for about $70. Get a corsair PSU $60 or so. That will be more then enough for WOW to be played at max settings.

If you want something even better, get a Intel i7-2600 for $300. Plus get a nice sound card. Motherboard sound cards are okay for WOW but when the battles get heavy, mine has trouble. Hard to describe but I think it has to do with the limited amount of channels.

Anyways, for about $700-1000 you can get a good one. Oh, and don't forget the $99 Windows 7 OEM installation disc. And if your kid uses Microsoft Office for school, that is another $100.



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December 16, 2011 9:55:06 PM

"I noticed on there visuals screen that you need certian things to run the best setting and thats what im shooting for.."

did you mean the Window's Experience score?

I'd also add an SSD... evidently WOW load times a good bit better on one.
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December 16, 2011 10:38:27 PM

If price is an issue, get a AMD Phenom II X4 955 Black Edition 3.2GHz for around $140. Get a GTX 460 for around $180. Get a $130 motherboard that fits the AMD. Get a corsair tower case, Corsair Carbide Series 400R Mid Tower $100. Ram and hard drive for $150 total. If you want, for $15-20 you can get neon lights and put that in your tower. If the corsair doesn't let you see inside, go get another one. Get the corsair H70 water cooler, or equivalent for about $70. Get a corsair PSU $60 or so. That will be more then enough for WOW to be played at max settings.

If you want something even better, get a Intel i7-2600 for $300. Plus get a nice sound card. Motherboard sound cards are okay for WOW but when the battles get heavy, mine has trouble. Hard to describe but I think it has to do with the limited amount of channels.

Anyways, for about $700-1000 you can get a good one. Oh, and don't forget the $99 Windows 7 OEM installation disc. And if your kid uses Microsoft Office for school, that is another $100.
.....

Could you tell me the real difference between AMD and INTEL? It seems pretty debatable.

Also is ssd a hard drive that just loads faster?
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a c 92 B Homebuilt system
a b Ý World of Warcraft
December 17, 2011 2:06:09 AM

Quote:
If price is an issue, get a AMD Phenom II X4 955 Black Edition 3.2GHz for around $140. Get a GTX 460 for around $180. Get a $130 motherboard that fits the AMD. Get a corsair tower case, Corsair Carbide Series 400R Mid Tower $100. Ram and hard drive for $150 total. If you want, for $15-20 you can get neon lights and put that in your tower. If the corsair doesn't let you see inside, go get another one. Get the corsair H70 water cooler, or equivalent for about $70. Get a corsair PSU $60 or so. That will be more then enough for WOW to be played at max settings.


What's your budget? Let's start there. I can probably configure a really good setup if I had that number - then all the parts pretty much fall into place.

Quote:
If you want something even better, get a Intel i7-2600 for $300. Plus get a nice sound card. Motherboard sound cards are okay for WOW but when the battles get heavy, mine has trouble. Hard to describe but I think it has to do with the limited amount of channels.


Not necessarily. Most motherboards with built in audio will natively support 5.1 and 7.1 audio channels without problems, not sure how old yours is.

Quote:
Anyways, for about $700-1000 you can get a good one. Oh, and don't forget the $99 Windows 7 OEM installation disc. And if your kid uses Microsoft Office for school, that is another $100.


If you have to have Office that's one thing but you can get away with using Open Office for free and save $100.

Quote:
Also is ssd a hard drive that just loads faster?


An SSD is an HD without moving parts. It's naturally faster and the load times will improve dramatically over standard mechanical HDs.
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December 17, 2011 9:47:13 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Quote:
If price is an issue, get a AMD Phenom II X4 955 Black Edition 3.2GHz for around $140. Get a GTX 460 for around $180. Get a $130 motherboard that fits the AMD. Get a corsair tower case, Corsair Carbide Series 400R Mid Tower $100. Ram and hard drive for $150 total. If you want, for $15-20 you can get neon lights and put that in your tower. If the corsair doesn't let you see inside, go get another one. Get the corsair H70 water cooler, or equivalent for about $70. Get a corsair PSU $60 or so. That will be more then enough for WOW to be played at max settings.


What's your budget? Let's start there. I can probably configure a really good setup if I had that number - then all the parts pretty much fall into place.

Quote:
If you want something even better, get a Intel i7-2600 for $300. Plus get a nice sound card. Motherboard sound cards are okay for WOW but when the battles get heavy, mine has trouble. Hard to describe but I think it has to do with the limited amount of channels.


Not necessarily. Most motherboards with built in audio will natively support 5.1 and 7.1 audio channels without problems, not sure how old yours is.

Quote:
Anyways, for about $700-1000 you can get a good one. Oh, and don't forget the $99 Windows 7 OEM installation disc. And if your kid uses Microsoft Office for school, that is another $100.


If you have to have Office that's one thing but you can get away with using Open Office for free and save $100.

Quote:
Also is ssd a hard drive that just loads faster?


An SSD is an HD without moving parts. It's naturally faster and the load times will improve dramatically over standard mechanical HDs.



Well after looking around last night, I never computer stuff could get so dang exspensive lol but i could do 5 grand MAYBE six if it has to be.. I Wont be going water cooled either fans are just as good like you said...Also ill be getting windows probably xp unless there is a issue with it gaming wise. One more thing it possible to have a regular hard drive like a 1Tb and have ssd to Load faster or is that what ram would do anyway? or would it be better to just have ssd?
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December 17, 2011 10:11:53 PM

5-6 grand? Is that in Pesos? But seriously, you don't need to spend anywhere near that much. If it's mainly to play games like WOW, $2k us would get you a nice system. Or less, I guess the question should be how much do you want to spend.
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December 18, 2011 8:09:13 PM

I was going to write a little more but had to take off. Yes, you can use a regular hard drive and an SSD, you would put the OS and certain programs on the SSD and everything else on the HDD. You could go SSD only, but you would really want to have some other form of storage for backup purposes, like an external hard drive. The September system builder marathon would probably give you a good starting point for the type of parts you're considering, here is the link:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/overclock-cpu-sli-s...
There's a few things I would change, but again, it's a good starting point.
As far as the OS, I would recommend Windows 7 for various reasons. As long as you aren't using any expensive software that won't run on Windows 7, I can't think of any reason to go with XP.
Also, what is your monitor situation at present. Are you thinking about getting a new monitor..or 3? Given your budget, a multiple monitor setup is certainly doable.

edited: always catch typos after I post.
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December 18, 2011 9:27:22 PM

AM2A said:
I was going to write a little more but had to take off. Yes, you can use a regular hard drive and an SSD, you would put the OS and certain programs on the SSD and everything else on the HDD. You could go SSD only, but you would really want to have some other form of storage for backup purposes, like an external hard drive. The September system builder marathon would probably give you a good starting point for the type of parts you're considering, here is the link:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/overclock-cpu-sli-s...
There's a few things I would change, but again, it's a good starting point.
As far as the OS, I would recommend Windows 7 for various reasons. As long as you aren't using any expensive software that won't run on Windows 7, I can't think of any reason to go with XP.
Also, what is your monitor situation at present. Are you thinking about getting a new monitor..or 3? Given your budget, a multiple monitor setup is certainly doable.

edited: always catch typos after I post.



Ok thanks for the answer I'll probablr go 1tb hdd and a good couple of gigs for ssd. and what windows 7 wopuld you recommmend i see various ones out there. As of right now he will be playing on a 42 in Samsung LED tv in his room.. Ok so i got the Hard Drives out the way now what about the rest.. motherboard power supply video cards and what not.. (why would you have 3 moniters?)
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December 18, 2011 9:44:28 PM

Also why do people have more than one video card?? do they both run at the same time giving better fps?? And about RAM is it the more you have the faster you will load?
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December 18, 2011 10:19:53 PM

^treyc: you figured it out. You're learning fast :)  . Some people like more than one monitor to increase productivity (mostly work related), or to get a peripheral vision effect in games. As far as RAM goes, it doesn't generally have much of an impact on load times. It's basically a 'get as much as you need to run the apps you want' situation.
I would recommend 8Gb (2x4Gb), 1600Mhz, and as low of a latency as possible (without going up in cost too much as compared to regular CL9 latency).
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December 18, 2011 10:33:36 PM

Here's a comparison of the different Windows 7 versions:
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/products/co...
You definitely want a 64 bit version.
Also, OEM versions are only good for one computer while the regular retail version can be transferred to another computer (probably not going to be an issue though, by the time you get a new computer there will be a new versions of windows you'll want).
Professional and Ultimate have Windows XP mode, so they can run a lot of apps written for XP.

edit: Here's the newegg link OS software so you can easily compare prices
http://www.newegg.com/Store/SubCategory.aspx?SubCategor...
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December 18, 2011 10:40:37 PM

AM2A said:
^treyc: you figured it out. You're learning fast :)  . Some people like more than one monitor to increase productivity (mostly work related), or to get a peripheral vision effect in games. As far as RAM goes, it doesn't generally have much of an impact on load times. It's basically a 'get as much as you need to run the apps you want' situation.
I would recommend 8Gb (2x4Gb), 1600Mhz, and as low of a latency as possible (without going up in cost too much as compared to regular CL9 latency).



Ok you lost me. What is latency?? And doesnt the amount of RAM you get depend on the motherboard you buy? Or could.you just get as much ram as there is slots for it. I was doing some messing around on this build.your own pc site and one pf there choicrs was 64 gb (8x8Gb) im guessing thats a overkill amount.
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December 18, 2011 10:47:38 PM

The motherboard has a limit on the amount of RAM you can install, per slot and in total. You don't have to fill every slot to the max, and yeah, 64Gb would be massive overkill (unless your using the computer for something serious you haven't mentioned).
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December 18, 2011 11:11:47 PM

AM2A said:
If you want some technical info about RAM latency the wikipedia articles are decent:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CAS_latency
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SDRAM_latency

Basically, the lower the better.
In the product specs for RAM it should list the latency, it might only say something like CL9 or CAS 9, or list it as 9-9-9-24 (numbers will vary).



Ok ill read up on that.. But why have 2 video cards cant you only plug into to one if your using a tv. Sorry about the typing im using my phone..
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December 18, 2011 11:21:27 PM

You'd be plugging into one, but linking the two cards together. This is crossfire (AMD) or SLI (Nvidia).
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December 18, 2011 11:32:47 PM

AM2A said:
You'd be plugging into one, but linking the two cards together. This is crossfire (AMD) or SLI (Nvidia).



Ok I gotcha im pretty sure im going intel so SLI would be what id use correct? The problem is alot of people talk bad about Nvidias graphics cards.. Are they good or is it more peoples choice.. Also I think ill be using 2 or 3 8gb ddr3 RAM since its the latest thing, if everything.can go together anyways. Also what are some good name RAM maker
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December 19, 2011 12:03:09 AM

You could do either one (CrossFire or SLI), it just depends on if it is supported by the particular motherboard you choose. For RAM, I usually go with Crucial but alot of people like Corsair and g.skill

Just remembered that Tom's did a write up on video card performance in WoW:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/world-of-warcraft-c...

doesn't seem to be any Crossfire or SLI analysis, maybe someone else knows where find benchmarks for that...

For the Nvidia vs AMD thing, most of it is just people bashing the one they don't use.
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December 19, 2011 12:11:14 AM

AM2A said:
You could do either one (CrossFire or SLI), it just depends on if it is supported by the particular motherboard you choose. For RAM, I usually go with Crucial but alot of people like Corsair and g.skill

Just remembered that Tom's did a write up on video card performance in WoW:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/world-of-warcraft-c...

doesn't seem to be any Crossfire or SLI analysis, maybe someone else knows where find benchmarks for that...



This might be a dumb question but do you buy SLI??? :)  dont hate..
Also I thought motherboards can only support amd or intel.. Im leaning strongly on intel anyways just wanna know. Also I found 32gb ddr3 2400MHZ 8GB X 4 I just cNt see the latency is that a good set up though?
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December 19, 2011 12:18:38 AM

No, I'm only using one card at the moment. The AMD or Intel choice is for the CPU, Nvidia isn't owned by Intel last I checked. I guess the confusing part is that AMD makes both CPUs and graphics cards (they bought a graphics card company called ATI not too long ago).
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December 19, 2011 12:33:54 AM

AM2A said:
No, I'm only using one card at the moment. The AMD or Intel choice is for the CPU, Nvidia isn't owned by Intel last I checked. I guess the confusing part is that AMD makes both CPUs and graphics cards (they bought a graphics card company called ATI not too long ago).


No no im saying is SLI something you buy like if I wanted to use both video cards would I have to buy SLI to do that? What about that RAM I mentioned what is the MHz.. I noticed you mentioned 1600 is 2400 better?
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December 19, 2011 1:08:43 AM

You confused me for a minute, lol. No, as long as the motherboard is "SLI ready" and the graphics cards are "SLI ready" and the two cards are from the same GPU series, you're good to go. If you buy two of the same card they will be the same GPU series. You also need an SLI bridge which should come with the motherboard.

Yeah, 2400Mhz is better as long as it's supported by the motherboard. However, the difference in performance over 1600Mhz is very minimal, so I don't really think the increased cost makes sense.
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December 19, 2011 1:42:32 AM

AM2A said:
You confused me for a minute, lol. No, as long as the motherboard is "SLI ready" and the graphics cards are "SLI ready" and the two cards are from the same GPU series, you're good to go. If you buy two of the same card they will be the same GPU series. You also need an SLI bridge which should come with the motherboard.

Yeah, 2400Mhz is better as long as it's supported by the motherboard. However, the difference in performance over 1600Mhz is very minimal, so I don't really think the increased cost makes sense.



Yea thats what everyone else is saying too. ok so what about graphics cards Im lookin for best sp this.. The motherboard and processor I want top of the line
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December 19, 2011 3:18:02 AM

well, if you really want top of the line...

Motherboards (one of these):
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

CPU:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

"the best" is debatable so other people might recommend something else.
There is a very slightly better cpu but I couldn't recommend it for the cost. I'm having a hard time putting these items up as it is :) 


edit: I have to go for now, please don't run out and buy this stuff right this second. The cost his high and might not really be worth it ultimately.
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December 19, 2011 6:01:10 PM

OK, I can explain further now. As this is a gaming PC I would expect that you would use this for maybe 4 years before looking to upgrade (maybe less if you're very concerned about getting top performance). Going with the one of the above CPU and motherboard combos really wouldn't give you any tangible performance advantage in gaming right now as opposed to an I7 2600K and LGA 1155 motherboard, and I doubt it would make a big difference even within the 4 year time frame. Add in the fact that an I7 2600K and LGA 1155 mobo would cost roughly half what the above items retail for, and I think that the right choice becomes more apparent. Even outside of gaming, the 3930K only offers a performance increase of roughly 15% on average according to a recent Tom's article. The target market for the 3930K is really professional use, where performance increases equate to increased revenues. If you still have your heart set on the 3930K it's your choice, and I won't argue/try to convince you otherwise.

Here's a couple links for an possible 2600K build
motherboard: ASUS P8Z68 DELUXE/GEN3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard with UEFI BIOS
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

CPU: Intel Core i7-2600K Sandy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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December 19, 2011 6:09:26 PM

AM2A said:
OK, I can explain further now. As this is a gaming PC I would expect that you would use this for maybe 4 years before looking to upgrade (maybe less if you're very concerned about getting top performance). Going with the one of the above CPU and motherboard combos really wouldn't give you any tangible performance advantage in gaming right now as opposed to an I7 2600K and LGA 1155 motherboard, and I doubt it would make a big difference even within the 4 year time frame. Add in the fact that an I7 2600K and LGA 1155 mobo would cost roughly half what the above items retail for, and I think that the right choice becomes more apparent. Even outside of gaming, the 3930K only offers a performance increase of roughly 15% on average according to a recent Tom's article. The target market for the 3930K is really professional use, where performance increases equate to increased revenues. If you still have your heart set on the 3930K it's your choice, and I won't argue/try to convince you otherwise.

Here's a couple links for an possible 2600K build
motherboard: ASUS P8Z68 DELUXE/GEN3 LGA 1155 Intel Z68 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard with UEFI BIOS
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

CPU: Intel Core i7-2600K Sandy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Yea thats a pretty reason lol does that motherboard have SLI? What kind of RAM could I use?
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December 19, 2011 6:25:43 PM

Yes, the motherboard supports both SLI and CrossFire.

For memory (this is straight from Asus):
4 x DIMM, Max. 32GB, DDR3 2200(O.C.)/2133(O.C.)/1866(O.C.)/1600/1333/1066 MHz Non-ECC, Un-buffered Memory
Dual Channel Memory Architecture
Supports Intel® Extreme Memory Profile (XMP)
* Hyper DIMM support is subject to the physical characteristics of individual CPUs.
* Refer to www.asus.com or user manual for the Memory QVL (Qualified Vendors Lists).
* Due to CPU behavior, DDR3 2200/2000/1800 MHz memory module will run at DDR3 2133/1866/1600 MHz frequency as default.

O.C. means overclocked if that's unclear.
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December 19, 2011 6:29:57 PM

AM2A said:
Yes, the motherboard supports both SLI and CrossFire.

For memory (this is straight from Asus):
4 x DIMM, Max. 32GB, DDR3 2200(O.C.)/2133(O.C.)/1866(O.C.)/1600/1333/1066 MHz Non-ECC, Un-buffered Memory
Dual Channel Memory Architecture
Supports Intel® Extreme Memory Profile (XMP)
* Hyper DIMM support is subject to the physical characteristics of individual CPUs.
* Refer to www.asus.com or user manual for the Memory QVL (Qualified Vendors Lists).
* Due to CPU behavior, DDR3 2200/2000/1800 MHz memory module will run at DDR3 2133/1866/1600 MHz frequency as default.

O.C. means overclocked if that's unclear.



Why and how would you overclock something
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December 19, 2011 6:40:53 PM

You asked about water cooling earlier, you'd really only do that if you intend to overclock like crazy...anyway, overclocking is when you run components like the CPU, memory, graphics card at settings above stock (the normal settings that these things run at). For example, you could take the I7 2600k, which runs at 3.4 Ghz normally, and overclock it to run at 4.2 Ghz. The process can be a bit complicated, but for this CPU it's actually pretty easy. Overclocking is done by adjusting settings in the motherboard bios (the bios is software on built into the motherboard that controls settings for all the hardware). If you overclock you should use an appropriate cooling system as the component will run hotter.
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December 19, 2011 6:45:30 PM

AM2A said:
You asked about water cooling earlier, you'd really only do that if you intend to overclock like crazy...anyway, overclocking is when you run components like the CPU, memory, graphics card at settings above stock (the normal settings that these things run at). For example, you could take the I7 2600k, which runs at 3.4 Ghz normally, and overclock it to run at 4.2 Ghz. The process can be a bit complicated, but for this CPU it's actually pretty easy. Overclocking is done by adjusting settings in the motherboard bios (the bios is software on built into the motherboard that controls settings for all the hardware). If you overclock you should use an appropriate cooling system as the component will run hotter.



Does overclocking make difference??
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December 19, 2011 6:55:21 PM

Yes, overclocking is basically a free performance boost. You can buy cheaper components and overclock them to perform the same as more expensive ones. Before attempting to overclock I would definitely recommend reading up on it, and asking a bunch of questions to people who have experience overclocking the particular component you want to boost. There are perfectly safe ways to overclock, but if you get too aggressive with it you can fry the component.
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December 20, 2011 4:35:05 PM

AM2A said:
Yes, overclocking is basically a free performance boost. You can buy cheaper components and overclock them to perform the same as more expensive ones. Before attempting to overclock I would definitely recommend reading up on it, and asking a bunch of questions to people who have experience overclocking the particular component you want to boost. There are perfectly safe ways to overclock, but if you get too aggressive with it you can fry the component.



Well I have no plans on overclocking anything if its good it shouldn't need over clocking anyways. Now as far as graphic cards go what are some good ones for intel? I plan on using two and doing SLI
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December 20, 2011 7:29:18 PM

I didn't want to scare you away from overclocking, I just felt that it would be irresponsible to mention it without the other stuff. If you enjoy tech, it's fun to mess around with, and you and your son will gain a better understanding of how computers work in the process. Good parts can be made better, and a year or two down the road you can think of it as a very cheap alternative to upgrading. It's something to think about anyway.

As for graphics cards, it's rather difficult to suggest anything right now. It's widely believed that AMD will be launching a new line of graphics cards very soon (maybe in a couple days), and even if you still want to use an Nvidia card I would fully expect that prices will be adjusted shortly.

The top of Nvidia's lineup currently consists of GTX 590s-560s, 590 being the best.

You said an LCD TV would be used, do you know the maximum resolution it can display? Also, the refresh rate would be helpful in making any recommendation. It will be something like 60hz, 120hz, etc.

Not sure if you already have an idea on the power supply, you're going to need a good one for this. I can recommend a few or give you an idea of what to look for.
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December 20, 2011 10:43:22 PM

AM2A said:
I didn't want to scare you away from overclocking, I just felt that it would be irresponsible to mention it without the other stuff. If you enjoy tech, it's fun to mess around with, and you and your son will gain a better understanding of how computers work in the process. Good parts can be made better, and a year or two down the road you can think of it as a very cheap alternative to upgrading. It's something to think about anyway.

As for graphics cards, it's rather difficult to suggest anything right now. It's widely believed that AMD will be launching a new line of graphics cards very soon (maybe in a couple days), and even if you still want to use an Nvidia card I would fully expect that prices will be adjusted shortly.

The top of Nvidia's lineup currently consists of GTX 590s-560s, 590 being the best.

You said an LCD TV would be used, do you know the maximum resolution it can display? Also, the refresh rate would be helpful in making any recommendation. It will be something like 60hz, 120hz, etc.

Not sure if you already have an idea on the power supply, you're going to need a good one for this. I can recommend a few or give you an idea of what to look for.


im not really sure.. Its pretty much the newest t.v out there its a 42 in samsung LED tv not lcd and I was figuring I would just go ahead and get a 1500 watt psu just to insure I have plenty of watts.
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December 20, 2011 11:42:36 PM

The refresh rate of the TV will determine how many fps the TV is capable of displaying. For a 60hz TV it would do 60 fps, 120hz would do 120 fps, etc. Your graphics card setup might be able to handle a higher fps than your TV could display.
I asked about the resolution as higher resolutions require more powerful graphics cards, but I think it's safe to assume the resolution is 1080p.

Looking at benchmarks, a single gtx 580 would be able to play WoW at around 100 fps on maximum settings. WoW really isn't too graphically demanding, other games can be much more demanding. Even still, I can't think of anything that SLI'd 580s couldn't handle.

About the power supply: As long as you aren't trying to SLI gtx 590s, a 1000 watt supply should be enough. The brand (and specific model) is very important when purchasing a power supply. There are many companies that sell horrible power supplies that will fry under load and possibly take out the rest of your system. I would recommend something from Seasonic, Corsair, or Enermax.

edit: forgot PC Power and Cooling, they make good ones also
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December 21, 2011 1:03:51 AM

AM2A said:
The refresh rate of the TV will determine how many fps the TV is capable of displaying. For a 60hz TV it would do 60 fps, 120hz would do 120 fps, etc. Your graphics card setup might be able to handle a higher fps than your TV could display.
I asked about the resolution as higher resolutions require more powerful graphics cards, but I think it's safe to assume the resolution is 1080p.

Looking at benchmarks, a single gtx 580 would be able to play WoW at around 100 fps on maximum settings. WoW really isn't too graphically demanding, other games can be much more demanding. Even still, I can't think of anything that SLI'd 580s couldn't handle.

About the power supply: As long as you aren't trying to SLI gtx 590s, a 1000 watt supply should be enough. The brand (and specific model) is very important when purchasing a power supply. There are many companies that sell horrible power supplies that will fry under load and possibly take out the rest of your system. I would recommend something from Seasonic, Corsair, or Enermax.

edit: forgot PC Power and Cooling, they make good ones also



Ill see about the tv later on im sure it can handle anything thrown at it but ill check to be sure and Wow that would be a MAJOR difference from the 15-17 fps he gets now lol my poor child.
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December 21, 2011 1:21:48 AM

Yeah, it would be a huge difference. at 15-17 fps it would be stuttering all the time. and I would guess that's all on low details, cranking up the details will make the game much more enjoyable.
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December 21, 2011 3:17:09 AM

AM2A said:
Yeah, it would be a huge difference. at 15-17 fps it would be stuttering all the time. and I would guess that's all on low details, cranking up the details will make the game much more enjoyable.


lol well the tv will do just fine the resolution is 1920x1080 also the fps is 480
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Best solution

December 21, 2011 5:36:33 PM

That's a nice one, don't usually see 480hz. So, do you have a case picked out yet? You'll need a DVD R/W combo drive also, if you don't have one. Make sure it's SATA, Samsung, LG, and Asus make good ones. Shouldn't have to spend more than $20-30 on it. Probably need a couple case fans as well, cases usually come with one or two but you should use 4+ in this for good airflow. The size of the fans will depend on the case you get, probably 120mm or 140mm. Decent ones usually run $8-20. The next might seem a bit odd, but if you don't have a laser guided mouse I would recommend picking one up also. They work a lot better than trackball mice in my experience, and you don't have to deal with the trackball getting junked up. They do make "gaming mice" but I've never used one, so I don't really know if they're worth it.
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December 22, 2011 12:04:14 AM

Xp is OK but Windows 7 is totally worth the money. When picking a copy of Windows 7, I'd go for Windows 7 professional x64, I doubt you'll need any of the features "Ultimate" has to offer.
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December 31, 2011 11:04:15 PM

Best answer selected by TreyC.
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