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No BIOS, No Beeps, No Button Hold Shutdown

Last response: in Systems
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December 18, 2011 4:14:23 PM

Computer powers but it does not: beep, show BIOS, and shutdown by holding the button.

History:
When was the last time the computer worked right?
3 weeks ago. The computer is 2 years and 6 months old.
Was there something that happened right before things got bad?
I left the computer for 10 minutes with the monitor turned off (button), and when I came back there was no signal.
Did you install some hardware?
Nothing new was added to it this year.
Did you install some software?
Yes, in October I added Ubuntu 11.10 to the slave hard-drive.

Full Story:
When I turn on the computer via the power button, the monitor says it is not receiving any signal. In addition, holding the power button on the case does not shutdown the computer. I tried replacing the motherboard and the processor with a new one, but I still get the same result. Also, tried testing the computer with a case speaker and I do not get any beeps even when disconnecting the video card or memory.

PC Specs:
CPU: AMD Athlon II X2 250 Regor 3.0GHz Socket AM3 65W Dual-Core Desktop Processor ADX250OCGMBOX
(old: AMD Athlon 64 X2 5600 Brisbane 2.9GHz Socket AM2 65W Dual-Core Processor ADO5600DOBOXAMD)
Motherboard: ASRock A770DE+ AM3/AM2+/AM2 AMD 770 ATX AMD
(old: GIGABYTE GA-MA770-UD3 AM2+/AM2 AMD 770 ATX AMD)
RAM: CORSAIR XMS2 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 1066 (PC2 8500) Model TWIN2X4096-8500C5
CPU cooler: stock
Video Card: EVGA 256-P2-N761-TR GeForce 8600 GTS 256MB 128-bit GDDR3 PCI Express x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card
Power Supply: OCZ StealthXStream OCZ600SXS 600W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready Active PFC
Hard drive(s): Master: Western Digital Caviar Black WD6401AALS 640GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive
Slave: Seagate Barracuda 7200.12 ST3500418AS 500GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive
Operating Systems: WIndows 7 64bit Premium; Ubuntu 11.10 64bit
Case: Antec 300 ATX Mid-Tower
Other:
Logtiech MXS18 Gaming Mouse
Microsoft Razer Reclusa Keyboard

Self-Troubleshoot:
1. Tested individual RAM, and Mobo RAM slots.
2. Re-plugged every cable and hardware.
3. Took the motherboard out and re-tested everything on a cardboard box.
4. Replaced Motherboard and Processor with new ones (mouse now lights up, but PC power on without pressing button).
5. Purchased a case speaker to test both motherboards (neither gave beeps).
6. Purchased a power supply tester: Says the numbers are passable, except PG = 990ms
7. Threw money at case hoping it would feel pity and work again.
8. Waiting on a new power supply to hopefully save me from these 3 weeks of boredom.

Any help would be appreciated.
a b B Homebuilt system
December 18, 2011 4:38:42 PM

"7. Threw money at case hoping it would feel pity and work again. "
lol, I have tried that too... didnt work for me either, but it made me feel better having something pretty to look at :) 

Have you reset BIOS?

In all likely-hood the problem is with the power supply. They can sometimes test well on the tester, but then fail when under load. You can try a back-pinning technique while the PS is plugged into the mobo, but with the new PS on the way I would wait for that instead.

Take a good PC and try the Ram, video card, and all other swappable components in it... but be sure to do this one part at a time. That way you can at least know what parts are confirmed to be working.

When you get the new PS plug in ONLY the mobo, proc, one sitck of ram. Add a video card if there is no onboard video. See if anything happens when you take a screw driver to the on jumpers. If not, then you know the board is done, and possibly the CPU. If it does post then turn it off and try adding a HDD, turn it off and add the CD, turn it off and add the rest of the ram (one at a time if you want to be sure), turn it off and add the GPU if you have been using onboard, etc.
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
December 18, 2011 5:05:19 PM

Do you have a computer that works that you can start plugging your parts into just to make sure they work?
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a b B Homebuilt system
December 18, 2011 5:08:56 PM

disconnect everything but the power to the motherboard, power button, and the speaker.

only with the CPU and fan, no memory and video card, do you get a BEEP?
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December 18, 2011 5:11:39 PM

Yes, a family computer. The thing is 6 years old though, so I am afraid while swapping it's hardware it might not work again. Not to mention they hardily take care of it, so the thing is full of dust. Also, being a family PC means = other people want to use it. :( 

@emerald I tried that as well, still made no beep.
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
December 18, 2011 5:23:15 PM

What is your budget to fix this computer?

It sounds like you need a new PSU, tbh.

How old is the computer and how old is the PSU in particular?

When computers get old, the PSU is usually the first thing to go.
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December 18, 2011 5:43:50 PM

Update: With just the 4-pin CPU & Power SW Button connected, the Power Supply Fan, and CPU fan do not run (which is the only way I know they are turned on). Also, I am still not getting any beep from either motherboard. Do you need the 24-pin ATX Main Power Supply cable to be connected to the Mobo in order for it to beep or power on? If not, then it might turn out to be the power supply after all.

@Raiddinn
The computer was built 2 years and 7 months ago (05/2009). Same power supply since PC was built (darn why didn't I think of buying a psu first before buying a new mobo :??:  ).

New PSU was ordered on Saturday (12/18/2011), so I will either get it on Monday or Tuesday hopefully.
CORSAIR Gaming Series GS600 600W ATX12V v2.3 80 PLUS Certified Active PFC High Performance Power Supply
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
December 18, 2011 5:52:13 PM

You need to plug in both power cables in the motherboard.
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December 18, 2011 8:06:09 PM

Darn, in that case it still could be either the PSU or video card. I get a power up (PSU fan & PCU fan running), but no beeps from mobo speaker.
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
December 18, 2011 8:17:35 PM

You already ordered a PSU, just wait till it shows up and see if that fixes the problem.
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December 20, 2011 6:03:45 PM

yay! Now the mobo beeps with the new power supply. I will follow the beep codes, and hopefully find out it was just the psu that went bad. I will post back later today (hopefully from my PC) the results. Wish me luck! :p 
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December 20, 2011 7:08:53 PM

Finally! :D  1 long beep after connecting everything to the new power supply. I even got the bios for the new mobo displayed. Thanks everyone for your time and assistance trying to figure out this random problem. :) 

I am now wondering whether I should test the old mobo & processor? or not? Is it possible for a defective mobo to mess up a power supply? If so, I rather not test it. Especially now that the holiday shipping schedule is gonna get super busy for Christmas.
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Best solution

a c 78 B Homebuilt system
December 20, 2011 8:36:59 PM

You are welcome.

That being said, this problem isn't overly random.

PSUs often die in a span of 3 to 5 years. In fact it happens more often than not probably.

I am just sorry you replaced the old parts before I told you to trade out the PSU.

I would say that 95%+ likely your old motherboard and CPU are still both good. I wouldn't be afraid to test them if it were me.
Share
December 21, 2011 1:54:20 PM

Thanks. I will wait for the weekend to test it out. (want to test new mobo + cpu performance). If it does turn out to work, I think I will keep it as a spare. From what I heard, best way to test a hardware failure is by having a another working PC that is compatible.

I think I still might have warranty on the old messed up psu, but it probably only covers replacement cost. Which will leave me paying for shipping cost (spent enough money already).
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December 21, 2011 1:55:21 PM

Best answer selected by kingturtle.
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
December 22, 2011 9:22:57 AM

Indeed, it is very helpful to have known good parts laying around when you are trying to determine the source of a hardware failure. Unless you really need the space it would definitely be a good idea to store them in a closet or something.

If you do need the space, you could still try to sell the parts on eBay or something if they are still in good working condition and you know that because you tested it.
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!