Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Buying motherboard

Last response: in Motherboards
Share
January 30, 2013 4:25:17 PM

I'm currently making a computer, which is the first time, i'm not sure whats the point of spending a lot of money on your motherboard as long as its compatible. Does anyone know if there is a point?

More about : buying motherboard

a b V Motherboard
January 30, 2013 5:24:28 PM

More PCI sockets
More USB and SATA connectors
Higher build quality on average
Potentially higher maximum RAM
Better BIOSes
Better onboard video/sound
The list goes on...
January 30, 2013 5:53:59 PM

What can higher build quality do and better BIOSes?
Related resources
January 30, 2013 5:54:23 PM

What can higher build quality do and better BIOSes?
a b V Motherboard
January 30, 2013 6:43:28 PM

Better build quality means the board should last longer.

Better BIOSes means less bugs and more options for configuring your hardware or overclocking.

It is worth noting that some motherboards are simply overpriced and are not as good as their price. But in the majority of cases, you get what you pay for.
a b V Motherboard
January 30, 2013 6:50:33 PM

I'd get the best deal you can find on one that meets your projected needs from ASRock, ASUS, Gigabyte, or MSI.

smeezkitty was spot on about number of connectors, max ram, etc. Can also affect max overclock to a degree but not normally a lot for average consumer boards (some are specifically designed for liquid nitrogen overclocking and will be presented as such).
January 30, 2013 6:51:37 PM

A good example would be an ASROCK EXTREME 11, your paying a premium for higher quality parts, but the additional PCIE 3.0 LSI controller would normally cost you a few hundred dollars and take up a PCIE lane if you purchased it separately. To me quality is subjective, the reason I say that is simple, I had gone through over 10 RMA's on ASUS ROG RAMPAGE IV it sucked, horrible horrible board, however Asus is a pretty good company, someone else could have bought the same board, never had a problem and swear by it, I personally never considered an AsRock motherboard because frankly I thought they looked like crap, however I love this Extreme 11... Most of it comes down to what your looking to spend and what you are getting for the money. I have owned Gigabyte, MSI, Asrock, ASUS, Intel and EVGA, I personally prefer Asrock, and eVGA.
January 30, 2013 7:13:38 PM

MundaneAfro said:
I'm currently making a computer, which is the first time, i'm not sure whats the point of spending a lot of money on your motherboard as long as its compatible. Does anyone know if there is a point?

Motherboards dont really affect performance, some just come with better features, however if you are an overclocker all *7* chipsets from intel allow overclock, all amd ones allow overclock, the latest chipsets just support PCie 3.0
January 30, 2013 7:14:01 PM

The motherboard is the backbone on which your system runs. A cheap or bad motherboard will waste a lot more money than it will save. A bad motherboard can kill your CPU, memory, HDD/SSD, or GPU when it goes, the same way a bad power supply can take your system with it when it fails. The mobo is the in-between for power and data to all connected devices and components. I have had personal experience with a mobo with a bad BIOS chip that caused 2 HDDs and at least one stick of memory to clock and volt wrong, leading to them being damaged and useless.

Do you need to spend a ton of money? No necessarily. But first figure out your needs for features, and then pick a specific board that has a good track record. You can afford a risk on the storage drive so long as you back up your info because if your HDD dies you have a backup and nothing else gets damaged. You can go cheap on the memory, and even the GPU, because, again, if it dies it won't likely take anything else down with it. You really want to avoid cutting corners as much as possible with the motherboard and power supply, because along with the CPU these things can damage everything else if they individually have a problem.
a b V Motherboard
January 30, 2013 7:29:37 PM

Opaz1ka said:
Motherboards dont really affect performance, some just come with better features, however if you are an overclocker all *7* chipsets from intel allow overclock, all amd ones allow overclock, the latest chipsets just support PCie 3.0

A motherboard CAN affect performance. It is the interconnect between all of your hardware.
If it does not transfer data effectively or allow you to use your hardware to its fullest, you will see a performance hit.
January 31, 2013 3:51:51 PM

Thanks for all the help
January 31, 2013 6:55:04 PM

Opaz1ka said:
Motherboards dont really affect performance, some just come with better features, however if you are an overclocker all *7* chipsets from intel allow overclock, all amd ones allow overclock, the latest chipsets just support PCie 3.0

This statement is why you read these replys with a great deal of hesitation. To make this REDICULOUS statement is like saying "the engine really doesnt make a difference in your car. If you dont know, dont reply...and CLEARLY you DONT know.
a b V Motherboard
January 31, 2013 7:26:17 PM

I'll take a stab at this. Features are the biggest differentiators between model of mainstream motherboards. There are some performance differences but they don't vary wildly at similar price points.

My system at 4.1 will perform within a few fps of a Sabertooth (Rampage, whatever) at 4.1. I've never seen a single mobo roundup here or at Anand that showed sweeping differences. For my money, the difference is not worth the cost. If it is a big deal to the buyer then by all means it's worth it.
!