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Importance of ram frequency

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January 30, 2013 10:47:13 PM

I see that some boards have 8 slots, some have 4, my questions

1) Importance of ram frequency and the differences between what is out there and why its better

2) They have things called dual channel, what does this mean?

3) How does ram even work on a mobo aside from its cache memory for your computer? Like if i got 4 sticks of ddr3 ram on a board that had 4 slots, do I get fully 4 gb figuring if each stick is 1gb?
a b V Motherboard
January 30, 2013 11:05:50 PM

mobonoob2 said:

2) They have things called dual channel, what does this mean?

Dual channel is a method of increasing performance when pairs of ram sticks with the same capacity, speed, voltage and latency are installed by increasing the access window.
3) How does ram even work on a mobo aside from its cache memory for your computer? Like if i got 4 sticks of ddr3 ram on a board that had 4 slots, do I get fully 4 gb figuring if each stick is 1gb?
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Yes assuming the OS and motherboard support that much memory.
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a c 106 V Motherboard
January 31, 2013 3:40:28 AM

Why didn't you keep all your questions in 1 thread?

1. The importance would depend on the hardware. For some cpus, the ram speed is tied with the cpu speed so you need ram that will overclock high if you want to oc your cpu. For sb and ib, the ram speed is separate and doesn't really make much difference. In which case get the cheapest. If you are using an integrated graphics, it most likely uses the ram for its vram in which case the better the ram, the better the gpu performance. The performance of ram will depend on the mhz and latency. You want higher mhz and lower latency. Why is it better? Well faster is better isn't it? *Note you also want to see what voltage the ram is.

2. Think of dual channel as a 2 lane highway. You can have double the traffic than 1 lane.

3. As you said it is just the cache. The cpu needs info to process and it needs memory that can keep up with it so the cpu can perform at it's max. You don't want it to wait for the info and sit there dormant when it has work to do. This is also why ram doesn't make a difference in some situations because as long as the ram is fast enough to not bottleneck the cpu then faster ram won't make the cpu go faster.
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a b V Motherboard
January 31, 2013 10:28:22 AM

1. Higher frequency is better. Frequency means speeds so higher the frequency higher the ram working speed

2. Single/dual/triple/quad channel means how many cards are working at the same time to complete a single process

3. If you have four sticks of ram, windows will show 4gB if using a graphics card.
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a c 106 V Motherboard
January 31, 2013 4:13:06 PM

Xttony said:
1. Higher frequency is better. Frequency means speeds so higher the frequency higher the ram working speed

2. Single/dual/triple/quad channel means how many cards are working at the same time to complete a single process

3. If you have four sticks of ram, windows will show 4gB if using a graphics card.



1. Higher frequency can be slower because of timings.
2. 4 sticks on a dual channel system is still dual channel. 3 sticks on a dual channel system is flex mode dual+single. On systems without flex mode it will just be single. (What you said is true but I'm just adding to it.)
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a b V Motherboard
January 31, 2013 10:30:38 PM

k1114 said:
1. Higher frequency can be slower because of timings.
2. 4 sticks on a dual channel system is still dual channel. 3 sticks on a dual channel system is flex mode dual+single. On systems without flex mode it will just be single. (What you said is true but I'm just adding to it.)

1. When you are doubling the frequency you generally don't double the timings so there still is a speed boost.
I forgot to mention that right memory placement is also important, thanks for that.
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