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[Graphics Card] Card that will fit in my PC?

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October 23, 2011 4:41:49 AM

Hey all.

I have a HP Slimeline s5120f system, and I am looking for a graphics card.

I bought a 6570 today, being told it'd fit in my case.. It doesn't.

So, are there any out there that will fit in the case?

The form factor for the MB is Micro-ATX.

I also need a new PSU, but I don't know it's form factor.. Help with that would be appreciated as well.

Thanks in advance.

I have more info if needed.

More about : graphics card card fit

October 23, 2011 5:07:03 AM

miketfromlv said:
Hey all.

I have a HP Slimeline s5120f system, and I am looking for a graphics card.

I bought a 6570 today, being told it'd fit in my case.. It doesn't.

So, are there any out there that will fit in the case?

The form factor for the MB is Micro-ATX.

I also need a new PSU, but I don't know it's form factor.. Help with that would be appreciated as well.

Thanks in advance.

I have more info if needed.


Your system's power supply is nonstandard. It's a custom size made for HP for their slimline cases - there's no way to upgrade the power supply. You'll need to get a higher-speed videocard that runs on very little power.
Also, you need one that is a low profile card WITH a low profile bracket. This means the bracket that lines up with the back of the case is half the normal height, and the card is smaller too.
You need something like this: http://www.bestbuy.com/site/XFX+-+Radeon+HD+4550+Graphi...
Notice the card includes a "low profile bracket." You have to take off the normal-size bracket (unscrew the VGA screwhole pieces) and put on the low-profile one. An HD4550 should run with no problems on your existing power supply, too. It's by no means a high-end card, but you can't expect to put a very fast card inside a case that small.
I recommend buying a card like this from a retail store like Best Buy because if it doesn't work or isn't the right size, it's way easier to return.
October 23, 2011 5:25:08 AM

dtemple said:
Your system's power supply is nonstandard. It's a custom size made for HP for their slimline cases - there's no way to upgrade the power supply. You'll need to get a higher-speed videocard that runs on very little power.
Also, you need one that is a low profile card WITH a low profile bracket. This means the bracket that lines up with the back of the case is half the normal height, and the card is smaller too.
You need something like this: http://www.bestbuy.com/site/XFX+-+Radeon+HD+4550+Graphi...
Notice the card includes a "low profile bracket." You have to take off the normal-size bracket (unscrew the VGA screwhole pieces) and put on the low-profile one. An HD4550 should run with no problems on your existing power supply, too. It's by no means a high-end card, but you can't expect to put a very fast card inside a case that small.
I recommend buying a card like this from a retail store like Best Buy because if it doesn't work or isn't the right size, it's way easier to return.



Thank you.

I was thinking of just getting a new case, and throwing my MB in the case, as well as my new power supply, and putting my card in.

A whole lot easier than buying a new computer.

Would this work?

I'm a noobie when it comes to building a pc from the ground up.
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a b U Graphics card
October 23, 2011 5:28:16 AM

I have to respectfully disagree @dtemple

I would go with the HD 6570 or HD 5670 in low profile
I own the low profile MSI HD 5670 in a Dell Optiplex Slim Desktop
this one
http://www.amazon.com/MSI-Radeon-5670-PD512-PCI-Express...

I run it on a Dell 280w continous PSU
I OC the card without voltage increase
I OC my CPU (C2D)
I have one HD,one DVDrw,5 fans,sound card and TV tuner card PCI
I have ran it on 24 hours 7 days since March
voltages are in tolerance and stable

You would be taking a chance as with any upgrade
but should be safe from my experience

One warning the fan assembly on the HD 5670 had to be modified
to fit because of the CPU heatsink/fan

also the HD 6570 is a good choice
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

both are low powered (no external PCIe plug needed)
both are low profile
since they only run on the PCIe slot wattage
they draw under 75watts on load

also be careful
check to see which PCIe version you have
if it is PCIe 1.0 sometimes 2.1 cards dont work depending on the mobo/chipset
definitely do a BIOS update if possible before installing the card

think of also upgradind your cooling by adding more fans especially around
the video card since slim cases have poor airflow generally
October 23, 2011 5:31:35 AM

miketfromlv said:
Thank you.

I was thinking of just getting a new case, and throwing my MB in the case, as well as my new power supply, and putting my card in.

A whole lot easier than buying a new computer.

Would this work?

I'm a noobie when it comes to building a pc from the ground up.


Not easier... but cheaper. Buying a new computer is definitely the easy way out of this mess.
Potentially yes, you could throw your existing parts into a new case. Slimline HP desktops use standard mounting holes for the motherboard (some are micro-ATX and some are mini-ITX). They also use standard-size DVD drives and hard drives. Keep in mind you're going to have to buy some SATA cables because the ones inside your current case are way, way too short to reach in a normal case.
You're going to want to check the physical size of the motherboard power connector. Some HP slimlines use a smaller-than-usual version of the 24-pin motherboard power connector, and swapping cases would be a dead end if that's what it has. Also, they may use a non-standard heatsink mount (it may bolt directly to the case through holes in the motherboard). I'll see if I can find any information on the internet for you about that.
Even if everything is against you in that regard, you could still do new motherboard, case, power supply, and heatsink. Reuse your existing CPU, hard drive, and DVD drive. You'd be buying half of a new computer, rather than an entire new computer. This would also open you up to the possibility of overclocking, since it would no longer be a crappy HP motherboard with no options in the BIOS.
I'll do some research and see what I can find out about your exact model.
a b U Graphics card
October 23, 2011 5:31:36 AM

miketfromlv said:
Thank you.

I was thinking of just getting a new case, and throwing my MB in the case, as well as my new power supply, and putting my card in.

A whole lot easier than buying a new computer.

Would this work?

I'm a noobie when it comes to building a pc from the ground up.



depends upon form factor
alot of OEM mobos and PSUs are BTX or ITX form factors especially slim models
ATX and mATX (standard cases) would probably need some sheet metal/plastic modifications
but definitley is possible

usually OEM specs dont specify form factor
but try googling your model number

a b U Graphics card
October 23, 2011 5:36:02 AM

dtemple said:
Not easier... but cheaper. Buying a new computer is definitely the easy way out of this mess.
Potentially yes, you could throw your existing parts into a new case. Slimline HP desktops use standard mounting holes for the motherboard (some are micro-ATX and some are mini-ITX). They also use standard-size DVD drives and hard drives. Keep in mind you're going to have to buy some SATA cables because the ones inside your current case are way, way too short to reach in a normal case.
You're going to want to check the physical size of the motherboard power connector. Some HP slimlines use a smaller-than-usual version of the 24-pin motherboard power connector, and swapping cases would be a dead end if that's what it has. Also, they may use a non-standard heatsink mount (it may bolt directly to the case through holes in the motherboard). I'll see if I can find any information on the internet for you about that.
Even if everything is against you in that regard, you could still do new motherboard, case, power supply, and heatsink. Reuse your existing CPU, hard drive, and DVD drive. You'd be buying half of a new computer, rather than an entire new computer. This would also open you up to the possibility of overclocking, since it would no longer be a crappy HP motherboard with no options in the BIOS.
I'll do some research and see what I can find out about your exact model.



I mostly agree with you
I am only familiar with OEMs using standard 20 or 24 pin connectors
(I own a small computer repair business)
alot of aftermarket PSUs have 20+4 setups
so should be fine

a new mobo would allow overclocking which would be very useful

I didnt look up model
but be careful of investing in "dead" sockets like LGA775 and AM2

only spend money on upgrades that can be used in future builds like PSU and Case
October 23, 2011 5:41:05 AM

So it turns out the s5120f uses a standard Micro-ATX motherboard. It was built OEM by Asus for them, but it uses a full-size 24-pin ATX power connector. I work for a computer repair shop, and I've seen several HP slimlines in person that used Mini-ITX motherboards with miniature-sized power connections.
That said, your existing power supply is only 220W. You shouldn't run ANYTHING ELSE in that computer. You're already running the Athlon X2 7750 which is based on original Phenom architecture, and rated for 95W TDP alone.
Get a new case with a better power supply, transplant everything into it, and you can get any videocard for PCI Express x16. Given that your options for a videocard are open now (because you'll be needing a new power supply and case), let's figure out what you need.
What games do you want to play, and what resolution is your monitor?
October 23, 2011 6:02:38 AM

dtemple said:
So it turns out the s5120f uses a standard Micro-ATX motherboard. It was built OEM by Asus for them, but it uses a full-size 24-pin ATX power connector. I work for a computer repair shop, and I've seen several HP slimlines in person that used Mini-ITX motherboards with miniature-sized power connections.
That said, your existing power supply is only 220W. You shouldn't run ANYTHING ELSE in that computer. You're already running the Athlon X2 7750 which is based on original Phenom architecture, and rated for 95W TDP alone.
Get a new case with a better power supply, transplant everything into it, and you can get any videocard for PCI Express x16. Given that your options for a videocard are open now (because you'll be needing a new power supply and case), let's figure out what you need.
What games do you want to play, and what resolution is your monitor?



Indeed..

My monitor will go up to 1650x1050.

I want a GTX 590.. but I can't afford it.

I just want a card I can use, as christmas is around the corner.. And I get lots of money for Christmas.. I'll probably use it to invest in an i7 and a newer card.

I like the 6570, but a 6990 would be perfect, as I want to play Battlefield 3.

I also looked into a Coolermaster RAF12 case.. Is that good?

a b U Graphics card
October 23, 2011 6:04:52 AM

i bow out gracefully :) 
October 23, 2011 6:19:30 AM

There's no point in investing in a card now that you'll have to replace in two months. However, I hope you can wait until you get your i5 or i7 to actually play BF3, cuz it will play like crap on that Athlon CPU you have. That CPU was a GREAT value for how fast it was in early 2008. That will be 4 years ago very shortly. You're going to be very much CPU limited until you get your faster setup.
If you can afford it, try to swing an HD6900 of some kind. Any of those cards will run it very well. An HD6950 1GB can be had for around $200 if you shop around.
Also for your case, I'm guessing you mean HAF 912? That's a great case for the price. When you order it, make sure you get a couple SATA data cables that are long enough to go from drive to motherboard for your HDD and DVD burner. 18-inch cables should be plenty.
You'll want probably a 550-600W power supply to accompany it, so that you don't have to rebuy after Christmas. Stick to Corsair or Seasonic.
a c 376 U Graphics card
October 23, 2011 6:23:48 AM

Did you actually buy a low profile HD6570 or was it full size?
October 23, 2011 6:27:51 AM

jyjjy said:
Did you actually buy a low profile HD6570 or was it full size?



It was smaller than the full size one.. But it wasn't small enough for my case.

There were two at the place I bought them, both with the same sized box.

I bought the $5 cheaper one, unsure if it would fit, instead of the more expensive one, that I knew would fit.
a c 376 U Graphics card
October 23, 2011 6:34:38 AM

This is a low profile version of the card.

It is what you need to fit in a slimline case. The full size version is too wide and will not fit.
October 23, 2011 6:39:04 AM

jyjjy said:
This is a low profile version of the card.
http://i.imgur.com/ZihTj.jpg
It is what you need to fit in a slimline case. The full size version is too wide and will not fit.
http://i.imgur.com/dgkdj.jpg


The card itself fit.. Just the outside part (The metal you see on the back of the PC) was too long.

Weird.
a c 376 U Graphics card
October 23, 2011 6:50:03 AM

The card should come with a second bracket that is smaller for when you want to use it in a low profile system. Like so:



If it is a low profile card but didn't come with that bracket that is lame and you should return it for a different model.
October 23, 2011 6:51:40 AM

jyjjy said:
The card should come with a second bracket that is smaller for when you want to use it in a low profile system. Like so:

http://i.imgur.com/gIojW.jpg

If it is a low profile card but didn't come with that bracket that is lame and you should return it for a different model.



Yeah, i'll do that.. I'll probably just end up getting a new case and PSU with the same card.

Thanks for all the help

:) 
a c 376 U Graphics card
October 23, 2011 6:54:38 AM

If you get a new case and PSU then definitely get a different card. The HD6570 is not particular good in general or a very good deal for the money. It is just one of the better low profile cards which is why it was recommended to you. With a new case/PSU you can get any card you want/can afford.
October 23, 2011 6:55:40 AM

jyjjy said:
If you get a new case and PSU then definitely get a different card. The HD6570 is not particular good in general or a very good deal for the money. It is just one of the better low profile cards which is why it was recommended to you. With a new case/PSU you can get any card you want/can afford.


In that case... What's a good card for the same price maybe $20 more?
a c 376 U Graphics card
October 23, 2011 7:19:20 AM

The HD6670 is a much better card and shouldn't cost much more. Be sure to get a DDR5 model, not DDR3.
October 23, 2011 7:20:02 AM

Alright..

I'll look into it.

Thanks a bunch for all of your help!
October 23, 2011 2:45:48 PM

The HD6670 and the HD6570 are almost identical. They have the same number of shaders, the same memory bandwidth... main difference is the core clock is 650MHz on an HD6570, but 800MHz on an HD6670.
An HD6750 has almost twice as much shading power, and is therefore almost twice as fast. HD6750 can be had for under $100, well worth the price. It won't max out BF3, but it'll at least play it. It'll also be much less of a bottleneck with your i7 when you get it.
a c 376 U Graphics card
October 23, 2011 6:43:57 PM

dtemple said:
The HD6670 and the HD6570 are almost identical. They have the same number of shaders, the same memory bandwidth... main difference is the core clock is 650MHz on an HD6570, but 800MHz on an HD6670.

The more important difference is DDR5 vs DDR3. It matters a lot on a 128-bit bus which is why I told him to steer clear of the DDR3 models which are basically HD6570s with a factory OC.
As for the HD6750 it is of course better but it is also generally $40 more expensive than the HD6570 while the OP requested within $20. An HD6770 for $10 more would be the better buy anyway if he is willing to raise his budget to that area.
!