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My first build

Last response: in Systems
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December 21, 2011 8:34:24 AM

Hope i'm posting this in the right section.

It's been a long time goal of mine to build a pc from scratch so i got all the pieces i wanted but i'm looking for some feedback before i put it all together.

Is there ganna be any issues with these parts and did i made good choices for my lack of experience. I've disassembled and reassembled several pc's of varying configurations in my life but have never built one so I'm a bit nervous.

Btw.. These components have already been paid for at a local retailer.

These are the specs:
PSU: Antec EA650 Green 650w
Mobo: GIGABYTE GA-970A-D3
CPU: AMD Athlon II X4 645
RAM: Patriot PC1333 Dual Sector 5
HDD: Barracuda Green Seatgate 2TB ST32000542AS
GPU: Asus Geforce GT430 1GB DDR3
Case: Thermaltake V3 Black Edition VL800

More about : build

December 21, 2011 10:38:14 AM

It's compatible..but not the best choice of items. I would recommend you get a HDD spinning at 7200RPM rather than 5400RPM because it is faster. Also, the cpu isn't the best.
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December 21, 2011 10:50:21 AM

Thanks for the response. I was impressed by the storage amount and neglected to see it's speed until after it was payed for so i do agree that i didn't make the best choice with that but at the same time I'm coming from a 250GB drive.

As for the processor I've been using an AMD Athlon 64 X2 4200+ for the last three years so it seems like a major upgrade but i am aware that amd is the value chip while intel is where it's at right now.
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December 21, 2011 11:14:21 AM

I need more infromation before i could help you? Follow the guide lines please
btw what are you going to be using you new computer for
also the gtx430 can only do some very light gaming
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December 21, 2011 11:33:05 AM

You can use a much smaller PSU if you want. The 430 doesn't even use a 6-pin power connection.
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December 21, 2011 11:39:44 AM

phenom 2 x4
ssd or 7200 rpm hdd sata3
better graphics card
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December 21, 2011 4:21:24 PM

I actually just wanted to know if i would run into any compatibility issues with this hardware. I wasn't aware the video card wasn't that great but i do know i messed up with the hdd.

I didn't follow the guidelines because i felt like it didn't apply in this situation. I'm not preparing to buy new parts, they've already been bought. I just want to know if everything will work when it get's turned on for the first time.

The machine will be used for 1080p movies, programming and occasional image editing in photoshop. I didn't think it would be of any use to mention it since I've already got everything.

I'm currently on 2GB of DDR2 @ 333mhz with two 250GB HDD's, a 2.2ghz dual core, a geforce 8500 gt and the oem board that came with this pc when i bought it so what may look like sub-par low budget equipment is actually high end compared to what I've been using for the last three years. Can't run any new games at all unless i wanna watch a slideshow and photoshop cs5 crashes after a while.
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December 21, 2011 7:32:44 PM

then the 430 should be just fine for you
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December 21, 2011 8:20:06 PM

Very nice :)  thanks for letting me know.

My main concern with this spec is my ram.
The motherboard supports 1.5v but the ram i chose is 1.65
not only that but it's the sector 5 series which according to the patriot website was designed and tested to run on intel i5 while my mobo and cpu are amd.

The gamer 2 series was designed for amd but the store i went to didn't have it in the size and kit that i wanted and i wasn't thinking about compatibility because it's never been an issue when i upgraded other machines but that was ddr1.

Should i be concerned?
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December 22, 2011 10:33:33 AM

You shouldn't really be concerned with the RAM with AMD systems. They normally support 1.65V RAM. Also the "tested for intel" doesn't mean that it's only for intel, it means that they did testing with Intel systems to make sure it works. It should work perfectly fine for AMD systems. If you really want, you can lower the voltage of the RAM in the BIOS if you feel unsafe with the current voltage. The only problem I see with it is if you are going to buy an Aftermarket Heatsink and fan then it might interfere with the heat spreaders.
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December 22, 2011 8:05:54 PM

r0aringdrag0n said:
You shouldn't really be concerned with the RAM with AMD systems. They normally support 1.65V RAM. Also the "tested for intel" doesn't mean that it's only for intel, it means that they did testing with Intel systems to make sure it works. It should work perfectly fine for AMD systems. If you really want, you can lower the voltage of the RAM in the BIOS if you feel unsafe with the current voltage. The only problem I see with it is if you are going to buy an Aftermarket Heatsink and fan then it might interfere with the heat spreaders.
Awesome! thanks alot for letting me know, been worried about that.
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