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Why can\'t I play a DVD that I burned on my laptop in a DVD player?

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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
a b D Laptop
March 29, 2012 5:12:39 PM

I burned a dvd on a +R and it will play on the computer and a dvd player but when I burned the same dvd on a-Rdvd it wilnot play on the dvd play why ??
a b à CPUs
March 29, 2012 5:23:53 PM

simply.

your dvd player is not compatable.


not all dvd players/writers are made equal


some only play dvd+r some dvd+/-

others play dvd+RW/-RW
a c 471 à CPUs
a c 433 D Laptop
March 29, 2012 8:38:53 PM

Apparently DVD-R disc are not compatible with your DVD player so from now on you should only use DVD+R discs.
Related resources
March 29, 2012 9:09:40 PM

It could also be a problem with your burn speed. when I'm burning DVDs I normally set the speed at 4x as I've experienced many problems playing media and files burnt at max speeds. It could also be the brand of disc as some 3rd party blank DVDs are notorious for corrupting data, I've had disks which made my believe my DVD encoder wasn't encoding files in the right format and tried another brand and it was fine (Both -R). Although as said previously it could be the disk format not being compatible with your DVD player.
August 25, 2012 6:51:52 PM

I have burned DVDs through an older Sony VHS to DVD piece of equipment. I had to purchase a Philips DVD/VCR to use the Sony. It did not have a way to do any editing. I was able to play those DVDs both on my computer and on the Philips. I just recently bought a cord that transfers to software on the PC so I can do editing. I hooked up another DVD player to the TV and brought the Philips up to my office to do the transfers from there.

I went down this morning to play one of the DVDs that worked on the Philips and it will not play. I am now running it through a Panasonic DV30 DVD player. I am in a quandary here as to whether it is the Panasonic that is the problem. I would be upset if I did all the VHS and then find it will not play on anyone's DVD player. I am using either HP DVD+R 16x or Verbatim DVD+R DL 8x for the conversion. Will the computer be the only place to play for some households?

Hauling the Philips back down to the TV is a possibility, of course, but how common is this problem. I am trying to make copies of all our 8 mm film for the family to have. I had them transferred to VHS way back. What is the point if they cannot play them? I am also converting some other VHS tapes we took later of the kids.

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated. Not a real techie, but I do muddle through as best I can.

Thank you,

CarolJoy :pt1cable: 
a b à CPUs
August 25, 2012 7:28:30 PM

OK, my experience is (1) make sure your burner has the latest firmware updates, (2) make sure that your burning software (Nero or whatever) is set to use compatibilty mode as far as filenames meeting the level 1 ISO 9660 criteria are set, burn mode is disc/session at once and write speed set to no more than 8X and not the max your DVD brand says it is.

Also use some quality DVDR brands - from http://www.digitalfaq.com/reviews/dvd-media.htm

My personal favorites are Verbatim manufactured in Taiwan (there's apps that'll read the disc coding and tell you what you have) and Taiyo Yuden, +R or -R doesn't matter as I don't own any really old DVD players any more.

Also you can update the firmware on some of the more expensive DVD players, and most BD players - read the owners manual.

Finally, DVD burners do wear out eventually - my now-ancient Pioneer burners on my Q6700 system could burn reliably at 16X when new, and now more often than not just 4X no matter what the media says. My new system has an LG BD burner that can burn at 16X on just about any media, but I limit it to the aforesaid 8X as I have found that faster speeds can result in lower longevity.
a b à CPUs
August 25, 2012 8:06:54 PM

CarolJoy said:
I have burned DVDs through an older Sony VHS to DVD piece of equipment. I had to purchase a Philips DVD/VCR to use the Sony. It did not have a way to do any editing. I was able to play those DVDs both on my computer and on the Philips. I just recently bought a cord that transfers to software on the PC so I can do editing. I hooked up another DVD player to the TV and brought the Philips up to my office to do the transfers from there.

I went down this morning to play one of the DVDs that worked on the Philips and it will not play. I am now running it through a Panasonic DV30 DVD player. I am in a quandary here as to whether it is the Panasonic that is the problem. I would be upset if I did all the VHS and then find it will not play on anyone's DVD player. I am using either HP DVD+R 16x or Verbatim DVD+R DL 8x for the conversion. Will the computer be the only place to play for some households?

Hauling the Philips back down to the TV is a possibility, of course, but how common is this problem. I am trying to make copies of all our 8 mm film for the family to have. I had them transferred to VHS way back. What is the point if they cannot play them? I am also converting some other VHS tapes we took later of the kids.

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated. Not a real techie, but I do muddle through as best I can.

Thank you,

CarolJoy :pt1cable: 


If your Philips is not transfering the video correctly or making playable DVDs, then I'd either see about warranty replacment or getting a refund if not too old. There could also be some incorrect settings, so I'd read over the manual first.

Alternatively, you could try using some other hardware to get from your VHS tape to editable files on your PC. The quality of VHS to DVD transfers is generally pretty low, but if you have or can borrow a mini-DV or HD camcorder that has an analog transfer port, you can connect the video output (either the yellow composite RCA port, or better yet the S-video if the player and camera support it) from the VHS player, to the camera and use the camera to convert the analog VHS output signal to a digital (AVI for Windows) format that you can then transfer (with Firewire for miniDV or USB for HD) to your computer. An hour of AVI format usually takes up somewhere around 12GB of hard drive space at normal quality settings. Personally I use Nero for quick & dirty projects, and Adobe Premiere Elements 10 for more serious stuff, as my video editor. Nero will do basic wipes & dissolves and titles and backgrounds and even music if your 8mm is silent and you want to add mp3 tunes or narration. Not nearly as much as Premiere, but the learning curve is far lower due to all that non-complexity :) .

If you wind up buying any software, google for discount coupon codes first :) . I got Nero 11 for something like $40 after finding and using coupon codes.

Other ways to accomplish it (for your VHS tape) would be to buy a cheap analog TV tuner add-in card for your computer, one that has a video port on the back for that yellow composite video or S-Video output from your VHS player. Or if the 8mm original tape is still in good condition, you can either have a company do the transfer for you (even Costco offers that service nowadays) or again if you have a DV or HD camcorder and your 8mm projector can be sped up to 30 frames per second, you can record the movie directly from the projector screen and then use software to do 3:2 pulldown to convert back to normal speed since otherwise you'll have a keystone cops effect where everybody moves too fast :) .

Once you have the digitized files on your hard drive then you can edit and piece them into a movie format, and then burn to a DVD. As I mentioned previously, make sure you burn with all parameters set for max compatibility, and at a slower speed.

Finally, be judicious with the clip editing - I find that most viewers, even a captive family audience at Christmastime, will take a snooze or disappear entirely if too many, too long and too boring segments wind up in the movie :D ..
August 26, 2012 12:02:49 AM

Yikes, a lot of technical stuff here. I was able to play the DVDs I had done through the Philips with the Sony machine I purchased several years ago. That was also my primary DVD player and every
thing played through it.

I then purchased a grabber cord and thought it would be nice to do it from my desktop onto the computer. The grabber installed with lite software included. I do have Nero 9 installed on my computer and could use that.

My issue is that we hooked up another DVD player when I removed the DVD/VCR from the HDTV. The plain DVD player will not play the DVDs that did play on the Philips one I am now hoping to use with the PC and grabber cable.

I have not even tried yet with the grabber through the PC.

My real challenge right now is how many DVD players will not play my VHS to DVD-R disks? I had no idea this would be a challenge. I suppose if they play on the computer, all is fine. Just a glitch I had not expected.

Oh, the only editing I thought might be possible was with all the 8 mm films I had put to VHS--I kinda wanted my first child's movie after the wedding. I managed to get that one out of order. Just 50 feet, of course, so no big deal, but it was a thought. Other than that I will not be touching them at all.

Thanks for the excellent advice on buying software. The VHS tapes of the 8 mm could be done by someone and I may do that, but I wanted to try and do it myself. I have succeeded, I thought, earlier on other VHS items I have which played great on the Philips and the HDTV. The replacement DVD for the TV is not accepting them.

I may plug the Philips back into the TV and see what happens. It may well be the DVD only player with challenge here. I used Philips and a Sony standalone VRD VC10 stand alone rewritable drive. I may go back to that method. I just kind of wanted to see the VHS as I captured it.

The ones I have done play great on the Philips to TV and on the PC. As you say not as clear, but I was not unaware of that part. So, I am just trying to troubleshoot the issue. It has to be the other player is what I am coming down to. Philip liked it fine, but Panasonic DVD player does not.

I am going to try and do one with the grabber and then burn it, just to try it. I will capture with Philips to PC and then burn from the pc to the DVD. Then see if it can play at all.

I am printing all suggestions given here and hopefully will try different things and see what happens. I have HP and Verbatim DVDs.

Again, open to suggestions and hopefully I have drilled you down to the challenges here. Right now I feel it is the Panasonic player giving me trouble. I have yet to even try my new grabber. I was just bummed when I tried to play one from the Sony rewritable VRD-VC10 that burned the VHS directly from the Philips to the DVD. It played on the computer and the Philips DVD when done.

CarolJoy

Carol

a b à CPUs
August 27, 2012 3:54:39 PM

^ Thought I'd mention that Amazon.com has a one-day-only halfprice sale on Adobe Photoshop & Premiere Elements 10, today only: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/ref=pe_72650_25519640_...

I too have transferred VHS tape to DVD in the past, and the DVD brings into sharp relief the general fuzziness and limited color capability of most VHS recorders, if you watch the DVD on a HDTV anyway :) . I have also used a DV camcorder to capture 16mm film that I inherited from my family, along with a Eiki movie projector that unfortunately cannot vary its projection speed due to being a sound projector as well. My "sometime in the distant future" project is to force the projector to 29.97 frames per second by replacing the motor pulley wheel with one that is 24/30 the diameter so as to get the correct speed needed for successful taping.

I have achieved somewhat acceptable results with the DV camera by fixing the white balance & contrast & autofocus (i.e., opening up the aperture and lowering the effective shutter speed) after experimenting with them to minimize the flicker, but it is still pretty noticeable. You do get used to it after a while, and it is much sharper than what I got from VHS, but it ain't perfect. Considering that the 16mm film has also deteriorated in the last 60+ years from when my grandfather & later my father used the camera, I guess that'll probably be the best I could do myself and avoid paying the $$/ft price the commercial transfer companies want. I did clean the film first however - there are film cleaning & restoring chemicals available on the Internet, just make sure you do it in a well-ventilated room however.

Not sure what you mean by "grabber" cable - some sort of transfer cable I guess, USB maybe, along with the software. Hopefully Nero 9 will recognize it and let you capture video directly from the Philips player using the standard capture controls. But if not you'll have to use whatever app the grabber came with. If you can get the video stored on the PC in AVI or MPEG2 format, or something else Nero understands, Nero will be able to edit & assemble it and then burn DVDs playable on just about all DVD players made in the last 10 years or so. Just make sure you have updated the firmware on the DVD burner and use some decent quality DVDR discs.

Good luck & let us know how it all turns out.
September 29, 2012 4:20:42 PM

To use and play a writable DVD (could be +r, -r, etc...)

#1. Your DVD player must be programmed and mechanically to play the Media being used. (IE: If you try to put a DVD-R in a player that doesn't have this specification it will not play normally because the laser is incapable of reading the disc)

#2. The disc you burn on your computer must be formatted to play on a DVD-Player (non-computer).

To clarify, when a DVD player reads a disc there are a set of instructions that tell the player what tracks to initially play. These initial tracks have the warnings and eventually will normally bring up some form of a menu for you to select the show or content to be played. In commercial DVD's those initial instructions give us the warnings we know and love and eventually the Menu to start the film.

When burning a DVD from a computer select to indicate the disc being created is for a player (may also say non-computer hardware). Simply dragging files to the DVD icon in Explorer normally will just create a data (computer disc). Dependent on the operating system and manufacturer you may have specific software to make a DVD Player variety DVD. (example: Roxio Popcorn, Corel Movie Factory, Adobe Encore) Windows Media Player may also have some functionality to create them, but I haven't used it for burning for years.

If you have verified #1, and completed #2

#3. Dependent on your computer you may need to "leave it alone" during the burning process. Particularly if you are trying to burn at max speed. I've had problems on one of my computers where if I attempted to navigate the internet or access certain programs the DVD burner would 1/2 the time create an unplayable disc. This is a trial an error process that I just choose to start the DVD burning and go off and get a drink from the kitchen, check the mail, etc.

NOTE: If you are using the disc just for storage (files, backups, etc) these introductory areas will attempt to tell a computer to open the DVD player program rather than just mounting the DVD and displaying the files. So you should select that it is for file storage (verbiage may vary)

Not sure why you were able to play a disc on only one type of player may be some proprietary burn format that was shared between sony & phillips.



Hope this info is helpful.
September 29, 2012 6:05:39 PM

jaguarskx said:
Apparently DVD-R disc are not compatible with your DVD player so from now on you should only use DVD+R discs.


I am using DVD+R disks. If I read the manual for these DVD players, will it tell me what they take? I thought DVD+R were the standard. I will find the manuals and check it out, of course.
September 29, 2012 6:06:47 PM

mikes1992 said:
It could also be a problem with your burn speed. when I'm burning DVDs I normally set the speed at 4x as I've experienced many problems playing media and files burnt at max speeds. It could also be the brand of disc as some 3rd party blank DVDs are notorious for corrupting data, I've had disks which made my believe my DVD encoder wasn't encoding files in the right format and tried another brand and it was fine (Both -R). Although as said previously it could be the disk format not being compatible with your DVD player.


I am using HP DVD+R disks. They work fine on one player but not the other.
September 29, 2012 6:20:02 PM

fazers_on_stun said:
If your Philips is not transfering the video correctly or making playable DVDs, then I'd either see about warranty replacment or getting a refund if not too old. There could also be some incorrect settings, so I'd read over the manual first.

Alternatively, you could try using some other hardware to get from your VHS tape to editable files on your PC. The quality of VHS to DVD transfers is generally pretty low, but if you have or can borrow a mini-DV or HD camcorder that has an analog transfer port, you can connect the video output (either the yellow composite RCA port, or better yet the S-video if the player and camera support it) from the VHS player, to the camera and use the camera to convert the analog VHS output signal to a digital (AVI for Windows) format that you can then transfer (with Firewire for miniDV or USB for HD) to your computer. An hour of AVI format usually takes up somewhere around 12GB of hard drive space at normal quality settings. Personally I use Nero for quick & dirty projects, and Adobe Premiere Elements 10 for more serious stuff, as my video editor. Nero will do basic wipes & dissolves and titles and backgrounds and even music if your 8mm is silent and you want to add mp3 tunes or narration. Not nearly as much as Premiere, but the learning curve is far lower due to all that non-complexity :) .

If you wind up buying any software, google for discount coupon codes first :) . I got Nero 11 for something like $40 after finding and using coupon codes.

Other ways to accomplish it (for your VHS tape) would be to buy a cheap analog TV tuner add-in card for your computer, one that has a video port on the back for that yellow composite video or S-Video output from your VHS player. Or if the 8mm original tape is still in good condition, you can either have a company do the transfer for you (even Costco offers that service nowadays) or again if you have a DV or HD camcorder and your 8mm projector can be sped up to 30 frames per second, you can record the movie directly from the projector screen and then use software to do 3:2 pulldown to convert back to normal speed since otherwise you'll have a keystone cops effect where everybody moves too fast :) .

Once you have the digitized files on your hard drive then you can edit and piece them into a movie format, and then burn to a DVD. As I mentioned previously, make sure you burn with all parameters set for max compatibility, and at a slower speed.

Finally, be judicious with the clip editing - I find that most viewers, even a captive family audience at Christmastime, will take a snooze or disappear entirely if too many, too long and too boring segments wind up in the movie :D ..


I have the 8 mm already over to VHS. Perhaps my single DVD only player is too old. Everything I want to do is on VHS. On transfer, it plays on one DVD player (with the VHS player) but not on the DVD player only that I have.
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