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Which specific components for specific requirements?

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December 24, 2011 4:40:34 AM

Hey guys, i'm looking to build a new PC sometime between june of 2012 and christmas of 2012. i built my first ever rig this past august; it has an amd phenom ii x6 1100t OC'd to 3.8 ghz, a radeon 6870, 16 gigs of ram running at 1333mhz. all things considered, it's a powerful machine but if i could have done it over again with the knowledge of PC components i have now, i would have done it differently.

the main thing i use my PC for, besides papers for school and such, is video editing and recording. i do let's plays/commentaries/walkthroughs and the like on youtube, so i'm constantly editing and rendering video. right now i do most of my gameplay on my xbox and use a capture card to get the footage onto my PC. from there, i edit and render it.

HOWEVER, i want to have something that can handle recording PC gameplay. i can do minecraft at about 45 fps now, but more strenuous games like the witcher 2 and bf3 can barely run while recording at about 30FPS. what i want is a PC that can record games running at higher settings (not necessarily ultra high) at somewhere between 40-60 fps WHILE recording. obviously, i also want a CPU that can render videos faster since the more time saved rendering means more time spent rendering other vids

obviously, most of these components are just announced or aren't even on the market yet but i can still speculate a bit:

CPU: Whatever powerful Ivybridge CPU is out at the time, hopefully around 500-600? (i don't know whether i need quad core or hexacore) and i WILL BE OVERCLOCKING! (it's an addiction now)

GPU: AMD Radeon HD 7970 (can't wait to get my hands on this baby!)

RAM: If i can, i'll keep my kingston hyperx 1600mhz 16 gigs

MoBo: I'm guessing an ivybridge-compatible mobo between 150-250 $$?

PSU: maybe the 850 Watt Modular PSU from corsair (or whatever is most similar and compatible with ivybridge) http://www.amazon.com/Corsair-CMPSU-850TX-850-Watt-Cert...

Storage: i'll keep my two 1 TB HDD's for storage, might buy a 256 GB SSD for booting and my main programs.

Basically, that's what i think i want. Although, there seems to be a lot of different options CPU wise. obviously, ivybridge seems to be the next generation, but i've heard that it might only be 5-10% more powerful than sandy bridge. in that case, should i go for something like an 17-3930k? will sandybridge-e be cheaper by then and feed my needs? I would like 6 cores if possible, as i probably won't upgrade for a few years after this. also, if AMD comes out with a good CPU with piledriver instead of the flop that bulldozer was, i might consider that since my current mobo is am3+ compatible and that would save me money.

also, for the graphics cards, should one be enough? the 7970 has 3GB of vram, which is much more than the 1 GB of my 6870. do i need two in crossfire? if so, what configurations?

i know a lot of this is speculative but i want to try and get as specific as possible to know the ballpark of what im buying. i expect this build will cost anywhere between 1000-2000 dollars, which is ok because ill be putting it on 12-month financing anyway. 2000 $$ is my limit but im aiming more for the 1500 dollar range. hopefully that 7970 will go down in price by summer!

thanks!

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December 24, 2011 6:38:34 PM

Sounds like you pretty much got what you want already. For video rendering the Ivy-bridge maybe the way to go but we won't know that until it comes and gets tested. I would be looking to Tom's Hardware for Ivy benchmarks against the sandybridge-e once Ivy comes out. I do believe intel is going to try to keep the first released ivy cost down to about the same as sandybridge $200-$400. Which would be better for your budget then the sandybridge-e at $500-$1000.

Since your wanting to record while playing and if cost really wasn't an option I would run crossfire 7970, but since it is, then a single 7970 should be suffecent for now and you can always add a second later.

Going with the SSD should help a lot with the video rending/recording and gaming as well and would recommend it.
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December 24, 2011 8:59:59 PM

tyranthoth said:
Sounds like you pretty much got what you want already. For video rendering the Ivy-bridge maybe the way to go but we won't know that until it comes and gets tested. I would be looking to Tom's Hardware for Ivy benchmarks against the sandybridge-e once Ivy comes out. I do believe intel is going to try to keep the first released ivy cost down to about the same as sandybridge $200-$400. Which would be better for your budget then the sandybridge-e at $500-$1000.

Since your wanting to record while playing and if cost really wasn't an option I would run crossfire 7970, but since it is, then a single 7970 should be suffecent for now and you can always add a second later.

Going with the SSD should help a lot with the video rending/recording and gaming as well and would recommend it.


thanks! i think you're right. i'm going to wait on ivybridge and see how it compares. in fact, i might just keep my CPU for an extra year and only invest in the GPU and an SSD if they will help with gaming performance and video editing/rendering performance respectively. i might even pick up an SSD before the end of the year. thanks for your input!
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December 30, 2011 11:57:10 PM

Best answer selected by ParadoxEternal.
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