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Bringing fryed 2500k back from the dead?

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March 30, 2012 9:53:14 AM

Hello everyone,
A while ago I had a freak overclocking accident that I think happened because of the LLC on the mobo, but anyway, my CPU was fryed. There was VERY hot air coming out of the exhaust and it didnt POST anymore. I had to buy a new one :-( and the dead one has been sitting around for a while.

I recently read alot of miracle stories about "baking" graphics cards and laptops in the oven and repairing them completely that way. Apparently the solder has micro cracks that melt back together when baked.

Is it possible to repair cpus this way? I dont know much about architecture but I'm not naive enough to think there is solder in there on the silicon. I read somewhere that one can "freeze" the cpu, which apparently works with RAM.

The cpu is as dead as can be, so I dont really care if it dosn't work.

Any thoughts?
a c 159 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
March 30, 2012 10:13:50 AM

If it's a retail version, I would request an rma from Intel. Just tell them it won't post. They may refuse it after inspection, but it doesn't cost much to ship by first class. I place the cpu in the small plastic container for oem cpus, and use a plain white envelope, taping the whole outside with clear shipping tape. It will go first class; you can also print on the envelope "hand cancel please". Be sure to place the stamps over the tape, or the post office will reject it. It only takes two first class stamps to mail it.
March 30, 2012 10:24:04 AM

....well I'd thought of that.

I mailed it to the retail saying "Oh the computer starts but the screen is black and the CPU LED on the board is lit." They sent me a new one free of charge. But a week later I get a bill from the retailer because they shipped mine to intel and intel didnt give them a new one saying "User induced damage"

Also I'm not in the US, Im in Germany, so I'm not sure all the postal tricks probably wont work for me. I know sending a letter stateside dosnt cost too much, so maybe I could send it after all.

It did occur to me thought that they cant refuse a DOA, however rare that may be.
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a c 151 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
March 30, 2012 11:04:23 PM

Intel already looked at it, they know you overclocked it and burned it out. They do have ways of tellin built into the chip.
Just throw it away or sell it on ebay as a novelty item...
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a b K Overclocking
March 30, 2012 11:25:02 PM

Sell it on ebay as a novelty item? Really? So "novelty" is now the new catch phrase for "worthless junk"? I have an entire closet in the house, and a cabinet out in the shop full of novelty stuff I reckon!
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a b K Overclocking
March 30, 2012 11:27:02 PM

Make yourself a geeky keychain?
March 30, 2012 11:55:21 PM

How do such things happen?

+ how do I prevent this happening to me?
I'm going to be building my own first build, I plan to overclock, so just wondering.



a b à CPUs
March 31, 2012 12:58:43 AM

kalel786 said:
How do such things happen?

+ how do I prevent this happening to me?
I'm going to be building my own first build, I plan to overclock, so just wondering.



Hi :) 

There is ALWAYS a risk in overclocking !!!

You CAN blow the motherboard and you CAN EASILY blow the CPU !!!

Everyone "thinks" overclocking is easy ...it is NOT and its ALWAYS RISKY...

We get a fair number of people come into my shops and say "I bought this CPU from you and tried to overclock it and now it wont start the machine" ..they then ask for a free replacement lol...

We very politely tell them that they will have to BUY another cpu and to not overclock it....

All the best Brett :) 
March 31, 2012 1:19:06 AM

geekapproved said:
Make yourself a geeky keychain?


I was actually thinking of making a keyring out of my 10 year old computers CPU.
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March 31, 2012 1:22:49 AM

Someone posted a picture a while back where someone made a keychain out of an old Pemtium 4. I have to try nd find it.
March 31, 2012 3:05:31 PM

Yes I had considered making a key chain of shame, but no-one has any knowledge of miracle operations that can bring back cpus?

Also popatim mentioned Intel has a way of knowing whether it was OCed? How does that work?
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March 31, 2012 3:25:37 PM

Max1s said:
Yes I had considered making a key chain of shame, but no-one has any knowledge of miracle operations that can bring back cpus?

Also popatim mentioned Intel has a way of knowing whether it was OCed? How does that work?


^ even i want to noe :)  Some fuse bit register or something that gets purposely blown as soon as the cpu crosses its max rated turbo freq??
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a b K Overclocking
March 31, 2012 3:48:32 PM

Max1s said:
Yes I had considered making a key chain of shame, but no-one has any knowledge of miracle operations that can bring back cpus?

Also popatim mentioned Intel has a way of knowing whether it was OCed? How does that work?


Don't you think that if you were selling millions and millions of parts, and warrantying them, you would have a way to test said parts to see if the user exceeded the warranty specs, or would you as a shrewd business person be willing to simply replace user broken parts for free? No, that ain't going to happen, not if you want to keep your corporation afloat.
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March 31, 2012 4:37:52 PM

Max1s said:
Yes I had considered making a key chain of shame, but no-one has any knowledge of miracle operations that can bring back cpus?

Also popatim mentioned Intel has a way of knowing whether it was OCed? How does that work?


I don't know exactly how they know but I'm sure they have a way to test it. Just like cell phone companies know if you ruined your phone by getting it wet. The "I got wet indicator" is a dead give away. This indicator is usually a white sticker located in the battery compartment of most cellphones. It turns red after it is gotten wet.
April 1, 2012 10:32:34 AM

Hmmm. Ok. Thanks for your guys' help. Guess I'm still stuck with a cool keychain. :-(
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a b K Overclocking
April 1, 2012 1:03:02 PM

You could give the oven bake method a shot but chances there is no hope and that is why I am very careful about how much voltage I use in my builds. I don't like high volts on my cpu(s) and have yet to kill one in many years.

April 1, 2012 1:35:28 PM

Yeah. I dont think I'll try the oven.

I didn't fry it with high voltage. I was using 1.29 volts. I had lowered the vcore voltage down from 1.3 to 1.29, and on restart it fried. No idea why. This was my first build, and first overclock. Great entry into the world of OCing... :-(
!