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GT/s compared to MHz

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March 30, 2012 10:23:21 AM

how do you compare both

More about : compared mhz

a b à CPUs
March 30, 2012 10:54:40 AM

GT/s = gigatransfer per second
MHz = Megahertz

They are 2 different things, you cant really compare them.
a b à CPUs
March 30, 2012 10:56:36 AM

Dont get GT/s confused with Ghz. GT/s is an amount of "bandwidth", were as Ghz is a wave lengh (speed of electricity).
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a b à CPUs
March 30, 2012 11:57:19 AM

silverliquicity said:
Dont get GT/s confused with Ghz. GT/s is an amount of "bandwidth", were as Ghz is a wave lengh (speed of electricity).


dude he's not an idiot!! he most probably asking with respect to RAM transfer speeds.....earlier core2duo's etc had speeds rated like 1333MHz, but the core ix series has them rated like 5GT/s...
a b à CPUs
March 30, 2012 11:59:58 AM

GHz is not wave length or "speed of electricity".
a b à CPUs
March 30, 2012 12:08:52 PM

FinneousPJ said:
GHz is not wave length or "speed of electricity".


i swear!! i wonder y pple who don't noe *** try to act like little Einsteins :na: 

Hertz, Hz is the no. of oscillations / sec !!!
a b à CPUs
March 30, 2012 12:58:29 PM

just what i found on google tbh
December 20, 2013 12:37:44 PM

silverliquicity said:
Dont get GT/s confused with Ghz. GT/s is an amount of "bandwidth", were as Ghz is a wave lengh (speed of electricity).


GT/s Giga-Transfers is also a speed rating, but not the same as GHz or MHz. It's like packets which contain so many bits or bytes, therefore quantitative measurements as well as speed. Just another type of rating which no one can truly understand without seeing the actual data packets transferred for their size and contents.

MHz / GHz are "frequencies" rated in cycles per second. Complete cycles of one sine wave per second is the Speed rated in these definitions. This is similar to the frequencies commonly found on your AM/FM radio, i.e. 92.1 MHz, etc.

I hope this information is helpful to understand more about the new nomenclatures involved. I prefer the KISS principle system, i.e. keep it simple, simple. Don't throw all this esoteric stuff at me all at once. My head may explode!
a c 471 à CPUs
December 20, 2013 6:35:23 PM

Let me use painting as an analogy.

GT/s is the amount of paint the brush can hold. The more paint it hold (bandwidth) the less time you need to waste dipping the brush into the paint on your pallet (that wooden board you hold in your other hand with globs of paint on it). The more "bandwidth" the brush can hold, the more paint (data) can be transferred to the painting canvas in a single stroke before having to re-dip your brush. The higher the bandwidth, the sooner you can finish painting because you waste less time re-dipping the paint brush.

GHz is the number of brush strokes you can make every 30 seconds assuming you do not need to re-dip the brush back to the pallet to pick up more paint. Simply stated, the more brush strokes you can make every 30 seconds the sooner you can finish your painting.
December 20, 2013 10:16:23 PM

jaguarskx said:
Let me use painting as an analogy.

GT/s is the amount of paint the brush can hold. The more paint it hold (bandwidth) the less time you need to waste dipping the brush into the paint on your pallet (that wooden board you hold in your other hand with globs of paint on it). The more "bandwidth" the brush can hold, the more paint (data) can be transferred to the painting canvas in a single stroke before having to re-dip your brush. The higher the bandwidth, the sooner you can finish painting because you waste less time re-dipping the paint brush.

GHz is the number of brush strokes you can make every 30 seconds assuming you do not need to re-dip the brush back to the pallet to pick up more paint. Simply stated, the more brush strokes you can make every 30 seconds the sooner you can finish your painting.


No, this analogy is incorrect.

The term GT/s applies to the possible number of transfers of a particular size, not bandwidth. The frequency of transfers depends on the clock speed, i.e. measured in MHz or GHz. At this point, you need to apply the following formula to determine how much total data can be transferred per leading of the cycle at its base speed, or leading and trailing cycles (DDR) of the clock speed in question by the following formula.

The formula for a data transfer rate: Channel width (bits/transfer) × transfers/second = bits transferred/second

If you compare the analogy of the number of trips made by an airplane to and from a destination, it may be one per hour or one hundred per hour. This is the GT/second specification. If this same airplane carries 1 ton of cargo at one trip per hour, the total amount of cargo transferred each trip would be the total cargo times the number of trips made per hour, i.e. 1 ton per hour. If the airplane carries 1 ton of cargo each trip, and the number of trips per hour is 100, then the total amount of cargo transferred would be multiplied by a factor of 100, i.e. 100 tons per hour.
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