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2 Graphics cards making my computer run slower?

Last response: in Motherboards
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February 6, 2013 6:39:52 PM

Hello,

I have an Asus P9x79 Deluxe, for my system at home. The main use of my computer is Davinci Resolve, which needs a graphics card for the GPU and another one for the GUI. For the GUI I have a Quadro 600, for the GPU I have a GTX 680.

For some reason, not when I first built the system, but after a few months, the system is not running Resolve as well as it should. What I did, after a lot of back and forth with the guys at Resolve, was to take out the Quadro 600, which actually allowed the program to run faster! So I'm thinking that somehow the board isn't communicating the right info, but at this point it is beyond me technically, actually beyond most people, so I don't know where to turn to for a solution.

Any help would be appreciated.

a b V Motherboard
February 6, 2013 9:54:53 PM

You would need an 800 watt or higher PSU for that rig.

Remember that you do need 25% free space for OS Windows 7 or later.
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February 8, 2013 2:44:05 AM

Thanks for your response. My current PSU is higher than 800 watt, and I have the space available as well.
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a b V Motherboard
June 3, 2013 1:01:49 AM

What is the difference between a GUI and a GPU?
A GUI (Graphical User Interface) is actually the screen of the monitor and not a video card although it could also refer to a utility dialog which a user would then make selections.

A GPU (Graphic Power Unit) actually refers to onboard video out and not a video card but people get lazy and refer to a GPU as a both or either.

You can't have two different video cards on one motherboard but I expect that you have realised this by now...

I just thought I'd upddate this thread for future reference.

Happy computing :) 
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Best solution

June 5, 2013 5:21:31 PM

TenPc said:
What is the difference between a GUI and a GPU?
A GUI (Graphical User Interface) is actually the screen of the monitor and not a video card although it could also refer to a utility dialog which a user would then make selections.

A GPU (Graphic Power Unit) actually refers to onboard video out and not a video card but people get lazy and refer to a GPU as a both or either.

You can't have two different video cards on one motherboard but I expect that you have realised this by now...

I just thought I'd upddate this thread for future reference.

Happy computing :) 


I'm confused by this. My current system is running the Quadro 600 and the GTX680. I'm using Davinci Resolve software that uses one card for the monitor/user interface, and the other card to process the files, labeled as the GPU. But my system does operate with the two different cards in it.

What happened in this situation, is that the mobo wasn't the correct version to operate with the video card drivers. I ended up having to do that and do a clean reinstallation of Windows.
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