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3 different types of memory

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February 9, 2013 12:00:15 PM

Hello all,

I have triple channel 1066 @ 2gb each
I have dual channel 1600 @ 2gb each

does it make sense for me to get a random single stick to fill my 6th slot on my mobo?

More about : types memory

a b } Memory
February 9, 2013 12:08:38 PM

What motherboard are you using? It already doesn't make sense to mix a triple channel kit with a dual channel kit of different speeds, because the motherboard will probably access them in *single* channel mode at the lower speed - to get the performance advantage of dual or triple channel memory, you need to have the same total amount and speed in each channel. You don't have to occupy all slots, though - just the first slot of each channel will suffice (though you might need to consult your motherboard manual to check which slots that means when there's more than one slot per channel)
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February 9, 2013 1:08:07 PM

It's an asus p6t,

I have 3x 2gb ocz platinum @10666

I guess my best bet is to invest in another triple channel set of dimms.

I've seen reviews that have oc'd the ocz's I have to 16000mhz, should I invest in some 16000mhz (9x9x9 timing) dimms?
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a b } Memory
February 9, 2013 1:34:31 PM

I have no experience with overclocking memory, but one thing it probably has in common with cpu overclocking is that some modules will overclock better than others, even when sold as the same model number. I wouldn't advise mixing oc'ed and non-oc'ed memory, but if you're talking about the 1600mhz sticks as an alternative to overclocking the ones you have, that would be different. If you can afford memory that's faster by default, I think that would be more reliable than overclocking memory to the same speed.
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February 9, 2013 3:41:06 PM

which brings me to my next question;

Can I combine OC'd ram with standard ram assuming the clocks are set to the same speed?
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February 9, 2013 3:51:14 PM

rathgor said:
which brings me to my next question;

Can I combine OC'd ram with standard ram assuming the clocks are set to the same speed?


Is it not recommended to OC the RAM higher clocks then where it has been tested, such as 1333 MHz. If you mix 1066 with 1600 MHz RAMs, all RAM modules will clock at 1066 MHz. Mixing RAMs are fine, as long as they have the same timings, you should be good. Or, go invest some new RAMs that is designed for triple channels, since RAMs are so cheap these days.
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a b } Memory
February 9, 2013 3:53:11 PM

Maybe you can. Depends on brand and mobo. But its better to underclock high speed ram to match with low speed one.
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a b } Memory
February 9, 2013 4:58:17 PM

Also make sure you're not mixing RAM rated for different voltages. Looking at Newegg, 1.5V seems to be the most common for DDR3 ram, but it is also possible to get 1.65V or 1.35V ram. There are other voltages in-between, but lower than 1.35V or higher than 1.65V is rare for desktop DDR3 memory.
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a b } Memory
February 9, 2013 5:00:54 PM

MauveCloud said:
What motherboard are you using? It already doesn't make sense to mix a triple channel kit with a dual channel kit of different speeds, because the motherboard will probably access them in *single* channel mode at the lower speed - to get the performance advantage of dual or triple channel memory, you need to have the same total amount and speed in each channel. You don't have to occupy all slots, though - just the first slot of each channel will suffice (though you might need to consult your motherboard manual to check which slots that means when there's more than one slot per channel)


Same capacity memory is not always necessary for dual-channel. It's not recommended because matched kits with different capacity modules are very rare, but it's possible. For example, I've managed to get a 2GB and a 4GB module to run in dual channel, granted it was just an experiment.
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a b } Memory
February 9, 2013 5:08:24 PM

blazorthon said:
Same capacity memory is not always necessary for dual-channel. It's not recommended because matched kits with different capacity modules are very rare, but it's possible. For example, I've managed to get a 2GB and a 4GB module to run in dual channel, granted it was just an experiment.


I stand corrected. From my P6T Deluxe manual (I'm not currently using this mobo, planning to put it in my dad's system when he's ready):
Quote:

You may install varying memory sizes in Channel A, Channel B, and Channel C. The system maps the total size of the lower-sized channel for the dual-channel or triple-channel configuration. Any excess memory from the higher-sized channel in then mapped for single-channel operation.


However, I noticed something else that will affect the OP's decision:
Quote:

Due to Intel spec definition, X.M.P. DIMMs and DDR3-1600 are supported for one DIMM per channel only.
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a b } Memory
February 9, 2013 5:11:48 PM

Yeah, higher performance modules often require more stringent configurations in Nehalem/Westmere systems. You're probably correct about that causing the issue.
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February 9, 2013 5:13:34 PM

What would be the consequence of overclocking my slower dimms? will it potentially fry my motherboard?

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a b } Memory
February 9, 2013 5:17:15 PM

rathgor said:
What would be the consequence of overclocking my slower dimms? will it potentially fry my motherboard?


Not likely. Frying the memory is possible, but usually doesn't happen unless you push it unreasonably far. You might be better off either underclocking it all to DDR3-1066 or maybe just overclocking and underclocking the kits to DDR3-1333. Still, it'd be simpler to sell the memory and get a single kit that suits your system's purpose well.
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February 9, 2013 7:20:45 PM

Thanks everyone, I'm going to test all of this tonight and see how it goes.

<3
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!