Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

1900-only useful in France?

Last response: in Technologies
Share
Anonymous
June 18, 2004 8:28:25 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

My wife & kids have Nokia 3200s, which are tri-band phones optimized for the
US (850/1800/1900 vs 900/1800/1900 for the ones optimized for Europe). The
question is, how useful is a 1900-band phone in France? They'll be in
Paris and Besancon.

Presently, plans call for them to use AT&T roaming (.99/minute), although
I'll look into unlocking their phones and using a local SIM card.

Thanks!

--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

More about : 1900 france

Anonymous
June 18, 2004 8:28:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

1900 doesnt exist in France. (OK someones gonna say that they were on an Air
force Base somewhere and got a signal right?) The Euro community only uses
900/1800 and you have that, it is all you need. Just make sure they know how
to go from 1900 to 900/1800. Some Motos for instance require a MANUAL change
to Frequency Setup. Bonjour

As to Unlocking an ATTWS phone, dont EVEN bother conbtacting ATT to do it.
They have a VERY tight fisted we dont give out UNLOCK codes to ANYONE
policy. You will need to do it online or use an unlocker like BOINGO
Wireless


"Mike Jacoubowsky" <mikej1@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
news:JbuAc.4595$4%7.4280@newssvr27.news.prodigy.com...
> My wife & kids have Nokia 3200s, which are tri-band phones optimized for
the
> US (850/1800/1900 vs 900/1800/1900 for the ones optimized for Europe).
The
> question is, how useful is a 1900-band phone in France? They'll be in
> Paris and Besancon.
>
> Presently, plans call for them to use AT&T roaming (.99/minute), although
> I'll look into unlocking their phones and using a local SIM card.
>
> Thanks!
>
> --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
> www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
>
>
>
June 18, 2004 9:14:19 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

On Fri, 18 Jun 2004 04:28:25 GMT, "Mike Jacoubowsky"
<mikej1@ix.netcom.com> wrote:

>The
>question is, how useful is a 1900-band phone in France? They'll be in
>Paris and Besancon.

1900 won't do you any good at all outside of the Americas. Europe
uses 900 and 1800. 1800 should work for you if there's an 1800
carrier available. 1800 is not as common as 900 but you shouldn't
have much of a problem.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
remove NONO from .NONOcom to reply
Related resources
Anonymous
June 18, 2004 11:00:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

On Fri, 18 Jun 2004 04:28:25 +0000, Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:

> My wife & kids have Nokia 3200s, which are tri-band phones optimized for the
> US (850/1800/1900 vs 900/1800/1900 for the ones optimized for Europe). The
> question is, how useful is a 1900-band phone in France?

It's about as useful as an ashtray on a motorbike.

--
Michael Turner

Email (ROT13)

zvxr.gheare1963@ivetva.arg
June 18, 2004 11:01:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

On Fri, 18 Jun 2004 07:00:59 +0100, michael turner
<zvxr.gheare1963@ivetva.arg> wrote:

>On Fri, 18 Jun 2004 04:28:25 +0000, Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
>
>> My wife & kids have Nokia 3200s, which are tri-band phones optimized for the
>> US (850/1800/1900 vs 900/1800/1900 for the ones optimized for Europe). The
>> question is, how useful is a 1900-band phone in France?
>
>It's about as useful as an ashtray on a motorbike.

Or a bicycle for fish! :) 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
remove NONO from .NONOcom to reply
Anonymous
June 18, 2004 11:12:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

> 1900 doesnt exist in France. (OK someones gonna say that they were on an
Air
> force Base somewhere and got a signal right?) The Euro community only uses
> 900/1800 and you have that, it is all you need. Just make sure they know
how
> to go from 1900 to 900/1800. Some Motos for instance require a MANUAL
change
> to Frequency Setup. Bonjour
>
> As to Unlocking an ATTWS phone, dont EVEN bother conbtacting ATT to do it.
> They have a VERY tight fisted we dont give out UNLOCK codes to ANYONE
> policy. You will need to do it online or use an unlocker like BOINGO
> Wireless

Please excuse my error; I meant 1800, not 1900. Is an 1800-only phone very
useful in France?

And yes, I'm aware of AT&T being hostile towards unlocking; I had my T68i
unlocked very quickly & inexpensively by a place in Oakland, CA, and they
apparently do the Nokias as well.

--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
Anonymous
June 18, 2004 11:12:09 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

"Mike Jacoubowsky" <mikej1@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
news:cBwAc.74271$8A3.28347@newssvr29.news.prodigy.com...
>> Please excuse my error; I meant 1800, not 1900. Is an 1800-only phone
very
> useful in France?

It should be OK.

--
Donald Newcomb
DRNewcomb (at) attglobal (dot) net
Anonymous
June 18, 2004 1:10:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

> Please excuse my error; I meant 1800, not 1900. Is an 1800-only phone
very
> useful in France?

Yes, 1800 is very useful in France. Ideally you should have 900 as well as
1800MHz.

SFR uses 900 MHz and Orange uses 1800 MHz. You have more choices of plans
and SIM card if you have both those bands.
June 18, 2004 3:14:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

On Fri, 18 Jun 2004 09:10:14 GMT, "Richie" <mbc@pacbell.net> wrote:

>
>> Please excuse my error; I meant 1800, not 1900. Is an 1800-only phone
>very
>> useful in France?
>
>Yes, 1800 is very useful in France. Ideally you should have 900 as well as
>1800MHz.
>
>SFR uses 900 MHz and Orange uses 1800 MHz. You have more choices of plans
>and SIM card if you have both those bands.

There are three networks in France: Orange, SFR and Bouygues.
Originally both Orange and SFR were 900, and Bouygues, which got off
to a late start, was 1800. Orange and SFR have started adding 1800 in
places where their 900 system is becoming saturated, but anywhere you
have an 1800 signal from either of them, a 900 signal is also almost
always available. These Orange and SFR 1800 locations are fairly rare.

Bouygues is still exclusively 1800 as far as I know. Their existence
in France was one of the principal reasons biband phones became
popular there. They got off to a later start, and their coverage of
the countryside is not that great. However, in any big city you will
likely be able to get a good 1800 signal from them.

So to answer the original question of the OP, if you are going to
Europe once doing touristy things, you will probably be OK in France
with 1800 only. You can buy a prepaid card from Bouygues while you are
there, and theirs have historically been the cheapest of the three
carriers.

If you are planning to travel to out of the way places extensively, or
plan to go back to Europe a lot, it's worth investing in the 900Mhz
phone, as it will get you a lot further.

Mike
Anonymous
June 18, 2004 7:41:02 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

> So to answer the original question of the OP, if you are going to
> Europe once doing touristy things, you will probably be OK in France
> with 1800 only. You can buy a prepaid card from Bouygues while you are
> there, and theirs have historically been the cheapest of the three
> carriers.
>
> If you are planning to travel to out of the way places extensively, or
> plan to go back to Europe a lot, it's worth investing in the 900Mhz
> phone, as it will get you a lot further.

Thanks. My own phone is a T68i tri-band, 900/1800/1900 (both European GSM
bands), and dang, that thing works so much better in France than it does in
the US it's crazy. I follow parts of the Tour de France, mostly in the
mountainous regions, and I don't recall ever not having a signal. Very
impressive. However, I'm told part of the reason was that, when roaming in
France on an AT&T sim, it goes to the strongest signal available on *any* of
the carriers... something that won't be the case when you have a particular
company's sim card.

Since the rest of my family will be in either Paris or Besancon, sounds like
they won't have any major issues with 1800 only, and Bouygues was the sim I
was looking into. Now just need to get their phones unlocked, *or* not
worry about it and have them roam a la AT&T (more expensive at
$.99-$1.29/minute, but possibly more reliable due to being able to roam onto
any of the available nets).

--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReactionBicycles.com


"Mike" <jwileman@panix.com> wrote in message
news:1816d0dmr03qkn6cgdiu1ddokcqflk1hdq@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 18 Jun 2004 09:10:14 GMT, "Richie" <mbc@pacbell.net> wrote:
>
> >
> >> Please excuse my error; I meant 1800, not 1900. Is an 1800-only phone
> >very
> >> useful in France?
> >
> >Yes, 1800 is very useful in France. Ideally you should have 900 as well
as
> >1800MHz.
> >
> >SFR uses 900 MHz and Orange uses 1800 MHz. You have more choices of
plans
> >and SIM card if you have both those bands.
>
> There are three networks in France: Orange, SFR and Bouygues.
> Originally both Orange and SFR were 900, and Bouygues, which got off
> to a late start, was 1800. Orange and SFR have started adding 1800 in
> places where their 900 system is becoming saturated, but anywhere you
> have an 1800 signal from either of them, a 900 signal is also almost
> always available. These Orange and SFR 1800 locations are fairly rare.
>
> Bouygues is still exclusively 1800 as far as I know. Their existence
> in France was one of the principal reasons biband phones became
> popular there. They got off to a later start, and their coverage of
> the countryside is not that great. However, in any big city you will
> likely be able to get a good 1800 signal from them.
>
> So to answer the original question of the OP, if you are going to
> Europe once doing touristy things, you will probably be OK in France
> with 1800 only. You can buy a prepaid card from Bouygues while you are
> there, and theirs have historically been the cheapest of the three
> carriers.
>
> If you are planning to travel to out of the way places extensively, or
> plan to go back to Europe a lot, it's worth investing in the 900Mhz
> phone, as it will get you a lot further.
>
> Mike
>
>
>
Anonymous
June 18, 2004 9:20:17 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

On Fri, 18 Jun 2004 04:28:25 GMT, "Mike Jacoubowsky"
<mikej1@ix.netcom.com> wrote:

>My wife & kids have Nokia 3200s, which are tri-band phones optimized for the
>US (850/1800/1900 vs 900/1800/1900 for the ones optimized for Europe). The
>question is, how useful is a 1900-band phone in France? They'll be in
>Paris and Besancon.
>
>Presently, plans call for them to use AT&T roaming (.99/minute), although
>I'll look into unlocking their phones and using a local SIM card.
>
>Thanks!
>
>--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
>www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
>
>
1900 800/850 are only used in North America, the rest of the wrold is
900/1800Mhz.

a 1900Mhz capability is worthless outside North America.
Anonymous
June 18, 2004 10:10:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

On Fri, 18 Jun 2004 05:15:41 -0700, Joseph wrote:

> On Fri, 18 Jun 2004 07:00:59 +0100, michael turner
> <zvxr.gheare1963@ivetva.arg> wrote:
>
>>On Fri, 18 Jun 2004 04:28:25 +0000, Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
>>
>>> My wife & kids have Nokia 3200s, which are tri-band phones optimized for the
>>> US (850/1800/1900 vs 900/1800/1900 for the ones optimized for Europe). The
>>> question is, how useful is a 1900-band phone in France?
>>
>>It's about as useful as an ashtray on a motorbike.
>
> Or a bicycle for fish! :) 

Or a chocolate fire-guard, a glass cricket bat, etc. :-))

--
Michael Turner

Email (ROT13)

zvxr.gheare1963@ivetva.arg
Anonymous
June 19, 2004 12:39:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

Mike vient de nous annoncer :

> Bouygues is still exclusively 1800 as far as I know. Their existence
> in France was one of the principal reasons biband phones became
> popular there. They got off to a later start, and their coverage of
> the countryside is not that great. However, in any big city you will
> likely be able to get a good 1800 signal from them.

Bouygues accessed to several 900 frequencies since 1999 now, and lately
to the entire 900Mhz extended-GSM frequencies. All 3 french operators
now have quite equivalent frequencies dotations now (900 and 1800). And
Bouygues BTS deployments have been very important last couple years.

Even without 900 capacities with your phone, you'll have no problem in
even small cities.

--
Christophe

Couverture GSM Oléron 2003
http://chantoine3.free.fr
Anonymous
June 20, 2004 1:24:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

> Bouygues accessed to several 900 frequencies since 1999 now, and lately
> to the entire 900Mhz extended-GSM frequencies. All 3 french operators
> now have quite equivalent frequencies dotations now (900 and 1800). And
> Bouygues BTS deployments have been very important last couple years.
>
> Even without 900 capacities with your phone, you'll have no problem in
> even small cities.

Christophe: Thanks for the information, greatly appreciated!

--Mike Jacoubowsky
Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReaction.com
IMBA, BikesBelong, NBDA member

"C Antoine" <chantoine99marreduspam@riendutoo.fr> wrote in message
news:mn.9a077d46f4fc54e4.9614@riendutoo.fr...
> Mike vient de nous annoncer :
>
> > Bouygues is still exclusively 1800 as far as I know. Their existence
> > in France was one of the principal reasons biband phones became
> > popular there. They got off to a later start, and their coverage of
> > the countryside is not that great. However, in any big city you will
> > likely be able to get a good 1800 signal from them.
>
> Bouygues accessed to several 900 frequencies since 1999 now, and lately
> to the entire 900Mhz extended-GSM frequencies. All 3 french operators
> now have quite equivalent frequencies dotations now (900 and 1800). And
> Bouygues BTS deployments have been very important last couple years.
>
> Even without 900 capacities with your phone, you'll have no problem in
> even small cities.
>
> --
> Christophe
>
> Couverture GSM Oléron 2003
> http://chantoine3.free.fr
>
Anonymous
June 20, 2004 3:40:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

>The
>question is, how useful is a 1900-band phone in France? They'll be in
>Paris and Besancon.
>

1900 won't work at all in France. Their frequencies are 1800/900.

--
John S.
e-mail responses to - john at kiana dot net
June 21, 2004 3:21:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

On Fri, 18 Jun 2004 15:41:02 GMT, "Mike Jacoubowsky"
<mikej1@ix.netcom.com> wrote:

>Thanks. My own phone is a T68i tri-band, 900/1800/1900 (both European GSM
>bands), and dang, that thing works so much better in France than it does in
>the US it's crazy. I follow parts of the Tour de France, mostly in the
>mountainous regions, and I don't recall ever not having a signal. Very
>impressive. However, I'm told part of the reason was that, when roaming in
>France on an AT&T sim, it goes to the strongest signal available on *any* of
>the carriers... something that won't be the case when you have a particular
>company's sim card.

T68i has gotten a bad rap in the US, but not so much in France. I
think it is because the GSM networks in France are much denser. It is
true that having a foreign SIM and a tri-band phone allows you to
communicate wherever any one of the three networks is present, but if
you are in town all three usually will be. I suspect the 900 system
works better because the SFR and Orange networks are denser.

Also, if you are getting an iffy signal while roaming, it often helps
to reselect another network manually. Once the phone chooses a
network, it will stick with it until the network is completely lost.
It doesn't regularly check to see if the current network still has the
best signal.

>Since the rest of my family will be in either Paris or Besancon, sounds like
>they won't have any major issues with 1800 only, and Bouygues was the sim I
>was looking into. Now just need to get their phones unlocked, *or* not
>worry about it and have them roam a la AT&T (more expensive at
>$.99-$1.29/minute, but possibly more reliable due to being able to roam onto
>any of the available nets).

If you speak French you can check out the bouygues web site at
http://www.bouyguestelecom.fr/home.htm Click on "sans engagement". For
15 euros you get 30 minutes, but bouygues bills by the second from the
start of the call, which the other networks do not. Also, in France
you do not pay for incoming calls, but people calling you from France
pay a lot, and people calling you from the US may have trouble getting
through.

If you need to occasionally call abroad from France, or even within
France, I recommend the service at www.lesminutes.com. It's a bigzoo
type service (but works much better) where you recharge online and can
call from any phone via a toll-free number. You can also use it to
make international calls from your cell phone without paying the
exhorbitant rates the cell companies charge.

Realize that if you roam in France you will also be paying AT&T for
the calls people make to you, so if you get a lot of calls this can
leave your final bill unpredictable.

Mike
Anonymous
June 22, 2004 2:01:54 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

Mike <jwileman@panix.com> wrote in
news:koudd0t84ec5p3lko4er40b9cld686jbrb@4ax.com:

> T68i has gotten a bad rap in the US, but not so much in France. I
> think it is because the GSM networks in France are much denser.

Well, its poor RF is widely recognized in France too ;-)... One should
expect many deadspots, especially in the boonies and indoors, with at T68i.
Even on Bouygues Telecom, the former "1800 MHz only" network (all three GSM
networks are fully dualband now).
The reason for that is quite simple : Regardless the operator, the 900 MHz
layer is aimed at rural or urban deep indoor coverage, and the T68i
performs horribly in this band (it's even worse at 900 MHz than at
1800/1900 MHz). The 1800 MHz layer, now traffic dedicated, will be found
mainly in cities but barely in rural areas. Bouygues is currently swapping
its old 1800 MHz rural sites into 900 MHz.


--
A+,

Olivier
June 22, 2004 2:24:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

On 21 Jun 2004 22:01:54 GMT, Olivier Boudot <oboudotspam@freeaol.com>
wrote:

>Mike <jwileman@panix.com> wrote in
>news:koudd0t84ec5p3lko4er40b9cld686jbrb@4ax.com:
>
>> T68i has gotten a bad rap in the US, but not so much in France. I
>> think it is because the GSM networks in France are much denser.
>
>Well, its poor RF is widely recognized in France too ;-)... One should
>expect many deadspots, especially in the boonies and indoors, with at T68i.
>Even on Bouygues Telecom, the former "1800 MHz only" network (all three GSM
>networks are fully dualband now).

I didn't realize that Bouygues had built out a 900 MHz network. I
never used a T68i, so I am only going by what I hear from people I
know who have one. I use a T39m with IAT-10, so I almost never find
someone else who has a signal when I do not (in France; US is a
different story).

>The reason for that is quite simple : Regardless the operator, the 900 MHz
>layer is aimed at rural or urban deep indoor coverage, and the T68i
>performs horribly in this band (it's even worse at 900 MHz than at
>1800/1900 MHz). The 1800 MHz layer, now traffic dedicated, will be found
>mainly in cities but barely in rural areas. Bouygues is currently swapping
>its old 1800 MHz rural sites into 900 MHz.

What do you mean by "traffic dedicated"?

Mike
June 22, 2004 4:29:47 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 10:24:50 -0400, Mike <jwileman@panix.com> wrote:

>>The reason for that is quite simple : Regardless the operator, the 900 MHz
>>layer is aimed at rural or urban deep indoor coverage, and the T68i
>>performs horribly in this band (it's even worse at 900 MHz than at
>>1800/1900 MHz). The 1800 MHz layer, now traffic dedicated, will be found
>>mainly in cities but barely in rural areas. Bouygues is currently swapping
>>its old 1800 MHz rural sites into 900 MHz.
>
>What do you mean by "traffic dedicated"?

1800 is usually added to give extra capacity. That's the same with
some carriers in North America who hold both PCS and cellular licenses
in the same area. AT&T Wireless is one such carrier. They own PCS
licenses in pretty much everywhere they serve. They don't own
cellular coverage in all markets that they serve. (PCS=1900 Mhz,
Cellular=800 Mhz.)

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
remove NONO from .NONOcom to reply
Anonymous
June 23, 2004 3:43:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

Mike <jwileman@panix.com> wrote in
news:95ggd01k2ffeqi2hovclne25ip9oi46n9c@4ax.com:

> I didn't realize that Bouygues had built out a 900 MHz network.

They started building it out in July 2000 IIRC.

> never used a T68i, so I am only going by what I hear from people I
> know who have one. I use a T39m with IAT-10,

This is an excellent choice ;-)... I personally use a R520m with IAT-10 !

> so I almost never find someone else who has a signal when I do not (in
> France; US is a different story).

Yes, pulling out the IAT-10 boosts the received field strength up to 8 dB
(mostly outdoors in flat rural areas) on the 900 MHz band. At 1800/1900
MHz, however, the difference is much less than that (mainly around 2 to 4
dB at best).

> What do you mean by "traffic dedicated"?

Joseph already answered this question, so I'll simply add a few details :
Bouygues Telecom, for instance, owns (depending on location) 49 to 73
"primary" and/or "extended" GSM 900 MHz channels, and 108 to 133 GSM 1800
channels. Thus, their 900 MHz layer is aimed at basic coverage
(especially in rural areas) where it's cheaper to go with lower
frequencies. Less cell sites are needed and coverage is generally more
comprehensive compared to 1800 MHz. Moreover, indoor coverage is
improved.
In densely populated areas and along highways and turnpikes, their basic
900 MHz layer can't always cope with traffic issues, so they've
developped (or kept up, in case of rural but touristic areas that were
live before summer 2000) a 1800 MHz layer which role is to back the 900
MHz layer.


--
A+,

Olivier
July 2, 2004 2:57:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

On 22 Jun 2004 23:43:04 GMT, Olivier Boudot <oboudotspam@freeaol.com>
wrote:

>Mike <jwileman@panix.com> wrote in
>news:95ggd01k2ffeqi2hovclne25ip9oi46n9c@4ax.com:

>> never used a T68i, so I am only going by what I hear from people I
>> know who have one. I use a T39m with IAT-10,
>
>This is an excellent choice ;-)... I personally use a R520m with IAT-10 !

Yes, I have one of these, too. My nephew calls it my "refrigerateur
portable."


>> What do you mean by "traffic dedicated"?
>

>In densely populated areas and along highways and turnpikes, their basic
>900 MHz layer can't always cope with traffic issues, so they've
>developped (or kept up, in case of rural but touristic areas that were
>live before summer 2000) a 1800 MHz layer which role is to back the 900
>MHz layer.

Does the Bouygues 900MHz network match the Orange and SFR networks
now?

Mike
Anonymous
July 9, 2004 6:20:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

Mike <jwileman@panix.com> wrote in news:lrtae0pcdeprs1n8ak7a99uskl7qlos6jp@
4ax.com:

> Yes, I have one of these, too. My nephew calls it my "refrigerateur
> portable."

Tsss... youngsters don't know anything but TFT-color-screen-polyphonic-
ringtone-handsets... even if they have a poor RF behavior ;-) !

> Does the Bouygues 900MHz network match the Orange and SFR networks
> now?

Orange is "average" everywhere, especially in rural areas, SFR is
unbeatable in the East and the South-East, but less than average in
Normandy.

Bouygues at 900 MHz is often better than SFR in the West, much weaker in
the South-East, generally speaking it's slightly weaker than Orange but
sometimes punctually stronger (especially in touristic places).

Bouygues is about to be better than Orange in Paris, as far as indoor
coverage is concerned.

As they open around 1000 new cell sites every year, they may match their
competitors' coverage by the end of 2005.


--
A+,

Olivier
Anonymous
July 11, 2004 8:11:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

Except, of course where it isn't worthless.

There are 1900 networks elsewhere, e.g., Thailand and Chile. There are
probably other examples.

None of this helps the O.P. in France, but the facts contradict your
statement.

"matt weber" <mattheww50@cox.net> wrote in message
news:nk17d0p4p1fvvutfamvl88glbi873nisbv@4ax.com...

> a 1900Mhz capability is worthless outside North America.
July 12, 2004 2:41:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

On Sun, 11 Jul 2004 16:11:34 -0700, "Ted Miller" <ted@nwlink.com>
wrote:

>Except, of course where it isn't worthless.
>
>There are 1900 networks elsewhere, e.g., Thailand and Chile. There are
>probably other examples.

You want to find them? Thailand only has one "odd duck" network. All
the other networks in Thailand are either 900 or 1800 as in the rest
of the world.

1900 is quite common in South and Central America. It's generally
true that 1900 is pretty much useless with maybe an exception or two
outside of the Americas.

>None of this helps the O.P. in France, but the facts contradict your
>statement.
>
>"matt weber" <mattheww50@cox.net> wrote in message
>news:nk17d0p4p1fvvutfamvl88glbi873nisbv@4ax.com...
>
>> a 1900Mhz capability is worthless outside North America.
>

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
remove NONO from .NONOcom to reply
Anonymous
July 17, 2004 1:04:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.gsm (More info?)

The post to which I replied said "useless outside of North America."

Thanks for proving my point.


"Joseph" <JoeOfSeattle@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:h7j5f0ttl5jn5h0bln7emp5snaumdptk7a@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 11 Jul 2004 16:11:34 -0700, "Ted Miller" <ted@nwlink.com>
> wrote:
>
> >Except, of course where it isn't worthless.
> >
> >There are 1900 networks elsewhere, e.g., Thailand and Chile. There are
> >probably other examples.
>
> You want to find them? Thailand only has one "odd duck" network. All
> the other networks in Thailand are either 900 or 1800 as in the rest
> of the world.
>
> 1900 is quite common in South and Central America. It's generally
> true that 1900 is pretty much useless with maybe an exception or two
> outside of the Americas.
>
> >None of this helps the O.P. in France, but the facts contradict your
> >statement.
> >
> >"matt weber" <mattheww50@cox.net> wrote in message
> >news:nk17d0p4p1fvvutfamvl88glbi873nisbv@4ax.com...
> >
> >> a 1900Mhz capability is worthless outside North America.
> >
>
> - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
> remove NONO from .NONOcom to reply
!