First build, constant BSOD

Hi everyone,

I don't have much computer knowledge, but my dad and I have been trying to make a build like this:

CPU: i5 2500K
MoBo: Asus p8z68-v lx
GPU: EVGA 570GTX (but I haven't gotten it yet so I've been using the onboard graphics)
RAM: Kingston HyperX DDR3 1600 2x4GB
PSU: Corsair T750 v2
HDD: WD Black 1TB

We're consistently getting BSOD with error code 0x00000124. It often occurs when trying to install software or updates, although I've also gotten it when browsing the web. BIOS and drivers are all updated and RAM probably isn't an issue since this is the second type I've tried with no change. Any ideas are much appreciated and let me know if you need any additional information.
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More about first build constant bsod
  1. First try each ram stick in dimm slot one, one at a time and run memtest, a free download. If that doesn't isolate your problem, then check your bios version at the top of the screen, then asus webpage for your board. Asus "ez flash 2" should be somewhere in your bios. I haven't flashed an asus board, but it can't be too difficult. But don't flash if your bios version is up to date.
  2. Thanks for the response. I tried running memtest multiple times and every time it would crash partway through. Also, I have flashed my bios and it's up-to-date. Anyone have any other ideas?
  3. If it's crashing the memtest and (you're absolutely sure) it's not the memory modules, then it's the mobo.
  4. RAM problems probably shouldn't crash Memtest unless they are catastrophic.

    Under normal circumstances, they should just register as an error and add one to the error total.

    Just sayin.
  5. Make sure the RAM values are set correctly in the bios, such as the timings and voltage. Asus normally detect the values well but sometimes it won't. I suggest you go into the bios and take a look at the timings.
  6. Thanks for the responses everyone. So I exchanged the motherboard for a Gigabyte z68. The good news is I can now run memtest (sort of). The bad news is my original problem has not gone away. I'm still crashing and getting 0124 errors during Windows installation, Windows updates, driver updates and sometimes even just going online.

    I ran three passes of memtest on a single stick in slot one with no errors. After the third pass the screen filled with strange characters (although the top of the screen was fine and I could see the test was still going). My dad looked online and came to the conclusion it was an issue with the bios. Anyways, with the one stick in the one slot that I knew was good, I tried doing Windows update. No luck. I then tried using a LAN connection (I had been using a wireless USB in my room until that point). Again no luck. I've also run the WD diagnostic tool on my HDD and passed the quick and extended tests and run the Intel processor diagnostic tool and passed that. My dad had heard about issues with some of the applications on the Gigabyte (specifically EZTune) so we tried updating without any of them installed and again no luck.

    I'm seriously at a loss at this point. Maybe we're missing something obvious, but it seems to me we've tried just about everything. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  7. If you can't get through a memtest without non-memory errors that may indicate a bad processor.

    Anyway, 3 passes with Memtest isn't good enough to make any firm conclusions. I would really like to see a lot more passes than that.
  8. phillips1080 said:
    Thanks for the responses everyone. So I exchanged the motherboard for a Gigabyte z68. The good news is I can now run memtest (sort of). The bad news is my original problem has not gone away. I'm still crashing and getting 0124 errors during Windows installation, Windows updates, driver updates and sometimes even just going online.

    I ran three passes of memtest on a single stick in slot one with no errors. After the third pass the screen filled with strange characters (although the top of the screen was fine and I could see the test was still going). My dad looked online and came to the conclusion it was an issue with the bios. Anyways, with the one stick in the one slot that I knew was good, I tried doing Windows update. No luck. I then tried using a LAN connection (I had been using a wireless USB in my room until that point). Again no luck. I've also run the WD diagnostic tool on my HDD and passed the quick and extended tests and run the Intel processor diagnostic tool and passed that. My dad had heard about issues with some of the applications on the Gigabyte (specifically EZTune) so we tried updating without any of them installed and again no luck.

    I'm seriously at a loss at this point. Maybe we're missing something obvious, but it seems to me we've tried just about everything. Any help would be greatly appreciated.


    Hmm I had similar issues with DDR2 Ram I bought for an old custom build. After getting the RAM RMA'd, 1 month later I started getting unexplained blue screens again. Theres no way this can be coincidence. What fixed the issue for me was stepping down the speed of the RAM in BIOS. I found out my RAM at its max speed was producing an overvoltage that was blue screening the build. Try that see if it works, and if it does, then you need to check mobo specs against the RAM voltages. And if I remember correctly, I got the same BSOD code.

    If it freezes in Memtest, you can certainly rule out software or drivers. At this point, its either incompatible or Bad RAM, or proceesor. Very few people have another processor lying around, but if you have something w/ the same socket, by all means give it a go.

    Also, I'm looking up your BSOD code, and it seems to also point mainly to PCI issues. If you have anything PCI like a wireless card, trying operating the build without the PCI cards being physically in the computer.
  9. Thanks for both of your replies. So I was under the impression that when everyone said memtest, they meant memtest86 and maybe that is the case. However, after getting the weird response on memtest86 I tried 86+ and was able to run it fine. I did 10+ loops on each module and everything came back clean.

    As a last ditch effort, my dad tried installing Xp on the computer (I'd been using Windows 7 64 bit until now, in case I hadn't mentioned it). The 64 bit XP crashed during installation (error 9c) so we left that alone. We then tried 32 bit Xp and the difference was incredible. We got through all installations, updates, whatever with not a single error. I've been using the computer to browse the internet, play in browser games, run a few stress tests, etc. for over 12 hours and have only had 3 bsod in this time (all 9c). Also, only one occurred without warning (with the other two, the computer seemed to be struggling to load the page before it crashed). I know that may still seem like a lot of blue screens, but from where I was on 7 over the last week this is pretty darn stable. So my question is, what could be causing this increase in stability in 32 bit XP?
  10. Believe it or not, XP is a lot more tolerant of bad RAM than Windows 7 is.

    Anyway, I was reading some things about why Memtest86 would fail repeatedly and Memtest86+ would pass without problems and apparently Memtest86 is more buggy than Memtest86+ is. I guess I will specify the + from now on.

    Do you have any files in the folder c:\windows\minidump? If so can you zip them and host them somewhere and give me the link (run through www.tinyurl.com if long)?
  11. I've got a few minidumps from today. Unfortunately I wiped all the ones from Windows 7 when switching to XP. Here's the link:

    http://tinyurl.com/7xuotcz

    Hopefully that works.
  12. I tried to dig through the files and one of them traced back to igxpdv32.dll which is related to the onboard graphics card.

    You might try uninstalling and reinstalilng this. If it still crashes maybe look online for a driver update.
  13. Hey Raiddinn,

    So you actually inspired me to try going through all the files I had and I noticed a pattern: all the errors were driver related, but most came from different drivers. In addition to the graphics driver you mentioned, there was another graphics driver, a USB driver, possibly the driver for my wireless USB adapter, an update driver, some kind of net kernel and a driver for CPUZ. I'm gathering they were drivers because that's what windows labeled them as. I have trouble believing these are the real issue though, as I'll describe below.

    My dad had some spare parts which he brought home, an HDD and PSU. So we tried switching those in one at a time and installing Windows 7. Both times it crashed (stop 124 as before) during installation. This is why I don't think it's a driver issue, since it's crashing before I've installed any drivers. For it to be any kind of software issue, it would require a basic incompatibility between Windows and both boards I've tried, which just doesn't seem possible.

    So to recap I've now tried:

    2 Ram Modules (Corsair and Kingston)
    2 MoBos (Asus and Gigabyte)
    2 HDD (WD and Seagate)
    2 PSU (Corsair and Athena, which is a no name brand I think)

    The only things I have had since the beginning now are my CPU, my CD/DVD drive and my case.

    At this point (under the assumption that software is not a problem) I only see two possible sources of issues: an issue with the CPU or incompatible RAM. However, each of these has arguments against them. I've run 3 stress tests on the CPU (the one Intel provides, Intel Burn Test for 10 loops on standard, and Prime95 on blend overnight) and all came back error free. Also, while I've read online about Sandybridges having voltage issues that cause BSOD 124, I've never heard of these issues in someone who wasn't overclocking.

    As for incompatible RAM, it certainly could be the cause of this, as neither of mine appear on the compatibility list for my current MoBo. However, I had these same issues on the Asus board with the Kingstom Ram, which is a compatible match according to the list they provide.

    Sorry for the long post, I just want to get it right this time after so many failed attempts to fix this. I'd love to hear from anyone on this: incompatible Ram, CPU or something else that I'm missing?
  14. Anyway, I have never heard of a case causing someone to have a BSOD except if the case wasn't cooling things properly and things were overheating because of it.

    The processor may be the culprit, even though it has been tested thoroughly. It does seem kinda farfetched, though.

    I would be more inclined to believe RAM was the problem since RAM is one of the top causes of BSODs. Right up there with heat, failing HDs, and bad drivers.

    What is the date on your bios version?
  15. Hey Raiddinn,

    I've been using the F9 Bios (the latest), which the website says was released on 2011/10/12. Honestly I'm not that confident in it being the CPU either. Then again, I don't think my return policy covers lack of compatibility and I've run enough memtests to be pretty sure the Ram isn't defective. I'd like to avoid having to buy a third set of RAM for this build if possible.
  16. Try just running on one stick of RAM. It doesn't matter which. If it crashes try a different one. Different slots too.

    Also, try operating with the sides of your case off.
  17. Just wanted to stop by and thank everyone (especially Raiddinn) for all the help. Turns out it was the CPU. I exchanged it two days ago and the computer's been going strong ever since.
  18. Glad it got fixed.
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