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Front case fan intake or exhaus

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April 9, 2012 10:45:22 AM

hi
i have pentium d 3.2 gz processor and the tempreature shown on the bios mode hardware monitoring is very high. it reaches quite higharound 68 C (after applying new thermal paste before it was around 78 C). does installing a case fan lower its tempreature.

in my digicom case only one extra 80mm fan with 3 pin connector be used on the front side of the case which lies directly ahead of graphic card(galaxy gts 250 1gb). should i use the fan to flow air inside the case or draw air outside from it? i.e should i blow air inside or outside of the case?
a b ) Power supply
April 9, 2012 10:53:32 AM

front/bottom/side intake

back/top exhaust

If you have temperature issues and still have some options left for putting more fans in, go for it. Cleaning dust can help, too. You already applied new thermal paste, which is good. :) 
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a b ) Power supply
April 9, 2012 12:42:49 PM

68C is a perfectly normal operating temp for most Pentium Ds. In fact I would not begin worrying about the temp until it were to hit 85-90c as those where some hot processors (basically 2 Pentium 4s slapped together with some duct tape). Some of the later ones were based on the Core processors, and those should not run that hot, but that was a short lived line.

Still what noise said is generally the best way to go about things; air goes in through the bottom, side and front, and then out the back and top.

Getting a better quality case that takes 120+mm fans would be good as well, as 80mm fans then to be noisy and don't move a whole lot of air.
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a b ) Power supply
April 9, 2012 1:42:29 PM

If you have an old case and are feeling "brave", get a saw and cut in some extra holes for more fans. If all fails, it's not much of a loss, but worth a try before getting a new case. Can be quite fun/rewarding. Case modding FTW! ;) 
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April 9, 2012 3:20:18 PM

CaedenV said:
68C is a perfectly normal operating temp for most Pentium Ds. In fact I would not begin worrying about the temp until it were to hit 85-90c as those where some hot processors (basically 2 Pentium 4s slapped together with some duct tape). Some of the later ones were based on the Core processors, and those should not run that hot, but that was a short lived line.

Still what noise said is generally the best way to go about things; air goes in through the bottom, side and front, and then out the back and top.

Getting a better quality case that takes 120+mm fans would be good as well, as 80mm fans then to be noisy and don't move a whole lot of air.


actually i found that there is place for two fans one in the back near CPU heat sink and other in the front but i have only 1, 3pin socket in the motherboard which one should i connect for better cooling.
can you suggest any software that can display cpu temp in window for pentium d as most of the software does not work for pentium d processors. actually i have to restart the system to check the temp lol..
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April 9, 2012 3:21:03 PM

actually i found that there is place for two fans one in the back near CPU heat sink and other in the front but i have only 1, 3pin socket in the motherboard which one should i connect for better cooling.
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a b ) Power supply
April 9, 2012 7:22:32 PM

You can buy 3pin to 4pin (molex) adapters and power fans directly from your PSU. That way you can put in more fans, without being dependent on the number of connectors on your motherboard.

Another option would be a fan controler, which allows for several fans to run directly from it, while it gets it's power from the PSU (via one 4 pin connector, normally).

As for where to put your one fan ... I assume the case has the PSU in top, right? Since this should already pull out some of the hot air from within the case through itself, I'd say put the one fan in the front to get some cool air pushed into the case.
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April 10, 2012 4:56:15 AM

whatsthatnoise said:
You can buy 3pin to 4pin (molex) adapters and power fans directly from your PSU. That way you can put in more fans, without being dependent on the number of connectors on your motherboard.

Another option would be a fan controler, which allows for several fans to run directly from it, while it gets it's power from the PSU (via one 4 pin connector, normally).

As for where to put your one fan ... I assume the case has the PSU in top, right? Since this should already pull out some of the hot air from within the case through itself, I'd say put the one fan in the front to get some cool air pushed into the case.



thanx for the reply, actually my psu does not draw any hot air from the system, the fan for psu is only for cooling itself as it has only one fan for exhaust at the back side. also i dont have any free 4pin molex left. how much power does fan draw? and what should i do with single fan in option, front or back?
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a b ) Power supply
April 10, 2012 9:55:47 AM

Fans don't draw much power, even with a lot of LEDs ~6W max. Non-LED Fans are around 1.x-2W.
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a b ) Power supply
May 4, 2012 12:50:49 AM

whatsthatnoise said:
Fans don't draw much power, even with a lot of LEDs ~6W max. Non-LED Fans are around 1.x-2W.

It depends on the fan. most consumer fans are in the 3-8W range, but if you get a real blower then a fan can suck down a lot of power. The tiny little fans inside u1 server cases can suck down 20W each when running full tilt, which is absolutely mind blowing.
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May 4, 2012 6:24:14 AM

CaedenV said:
It depends on the fan. most consumer fans are in the 3-8W range, but if you get a real blower then a fan can suck down a lot of power. The tiny little fans inside u1 server cases can suck down 20W each when running full tilt, which is absolutely mind blowing.


actually i used one 80mm rear fan for exhaust directly connection to psu with molex connector and i found that there are lot of places at least 4 place to connect extra fan and 2 motherboard 3 pin connector each for rear and front fan. i have reading around 45-50 C on idle but jumps around 60-70 while playing modern games. but on Intel website max temp is around 63c for Pentium d 935 3.2. should i change the cooler of cpu or add aditional fans?
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Best solution

a b ) Power supply
May 4, 2012 2:54:41 PM

OK, the Pentium D 935 is a Presler Core, which is 2 Pentium 4 Cedar Mill CPUs slapped together on the same chip. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Presler
They run hot, that is just a fact of life (there was a reason Intel moved away from netburst architecture for a while, and this heat issue is exactly it because it limited scale-ability). As I said in my original post, 60-70c on the stock cooler is entirely normal operation for these under load. In fact I have a few small form factor dells I work with at a school with a similar CPU and they get this hot just from loading windows, or installing software. It does not hurt them, it just makes the fan kick up a bit so it makes a little noise. You can always throw in an aftermarket CPU cooler to help get that temperature down a little, but adding another case fan will not help a whole lot unless you are in a room that is already quite warm to begin with (~75*f).

For fan controll and temperature monitoring I highly suggest Speedfan. It does not work with every motherboard in existence, but it is better than most, and it is free (which is always awesome). It is especially great if you have a cheap BIOS that does not allow for much in the way of fan voltage control.

again, you are running well within spec for this particular CPU, but you could lower the temp a good 10-20c by adding a good aftermarket cooler (I believe the hyper 212+ is LGA775 compatible). The only practical benefit would be to lower the fan noise, or to add thermal overhead to OC the system. It will not make the CPU last longer because you are not in danger of damaging it with those temperatures.
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May 4, 2012 3:37:36 PM

Best answer selected by manohar_62.
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May 4, 2012 3:43:16 PM

CaedenV said:
OK, the Pentium D 935 is a Presler Core, which is 2 Pentium 4 Cedar Mill CPUs slapped together on the same chip. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Presler
They run hot, that is just a fact of life (there was a reason Intel moved away from netburst architecture for a while, and this heat issue is exactly it because it limited scale-ability). As I said in my original post, 60-70c on the stock cooler is entirely normal operation for these under load. In fact I have a few small form factor dells I work with at a school with a similar CPU and they get this hot just from loading windows, or installing software. It does not hurt them, it just makes the fan kick up a bit so it makes a little noise. You can always throw in an aftermarket CPU cooler to help get that temperature down a little, but adding another case fan will not help a whole lot unless you are in a room that is already quite warm to begin with (~75*f).

For fan controll and temperature monitoring I highly suggest Speedfan. It does not work with every motherboard in existence, but it is better than most, and it is free (which is always awesome). It is especially great if you have a cheap BIOS that does not allow for much in the way of fan voltage control.

again, you are running well within spec for this particular CPU, but you could lower the temp a good 10-20c by adding a good aftermarket cooler (I believe the hyper 212+ is LGA775 compatible). The only practical benefit would be to lower the fan noise, or to add thermal overhead to OC the system. It will not make the CPU last longer because you are not in danger of damaging it with those temperatures.




thanks for the info. i am running speed fan 4.46 to monitor my temp. if the temp does not hurt my processor then its really fine as i have not faced any problems due to heat. i will try to find better cooler as u suggested but it hard to get in my market.
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a b ) Power supply
May 4, 2012 3:49:48 PM

You are welcome, glad I could help!

When picking a new cooler keep in mind that just about anything is better than the stock intel cooler. The oversized coolers are great, but are too tall to fit in many cases. There are shorter ones, but make sure that they do not interfere with your Ram or other parts as they tend to be short and wide. But for just about any situation there is a cooler that will work if you look long enough!

Good luck!
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