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New build

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December 30, 2011 10:40:37 PM

I just got done ordering my new parts What you guys think?


Case: TT Soprano RS(carry over from previous build)
GPU: EVGA GTX 460 768MB (carry over)
CPU:p henom II 1055T
CPU:Cooler TT V1
PSU:Antec High Current Gamer 750W
MOBO: GA-970A-UD3
Ram:G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 8GB DDR3 1600
OS:Windows 7 HP
HD: WD 500gig Caviar Blue

More about : build

December 31, 2011 3:14:50 PM

AMD CPUs are not a good choice if you want good performance and since you obught a six core CPU it should also be noted that most programs can't make use of even four cores very well yet, if at all.

That coupled with the fact that AMD Phenom CPUs are comparable to the performance per core of Intel's Core 2 Quads from three or four years ago doesn't help. AMD's new FX CPUs are actually even worse. They are slower per clock than Intel's Core 2 quads and that real isn't helping AMD right now.

Your PSU is a overkill in wattage for your system, you could have gotten a cheaper version unless you plan on using another GTX 460 with SLI.

Your memory is a great choice and for your processor that motherboard is also a good choice but you might want to do a decent overclock on that processor to help make up for it's poor performance per core. Even though it has six cores its low performance per core and the few heavily multi-threaded programs allow Intel's quad core CPUs to greatly outperform all of AMD's six core CPUs in almost everything.

I don't know what you plan on doing with this build so I don't know if you will use software that can make the most out of your six core CPU but I can say that for the most part only professional software utilizes many core/thread processors effectively.

I'm not saying that your computer will be useless because of your processor choice (I also have an AMD six core CPU) but it will have many limitations that would not have been in the way if you chose an Intel quad core with a similar price.
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December 31, 2011 4:08:15 PM

Ya I have heard mixed stuff about the 6cores but every bench mark i have looked at puts it well above the C2Qs (they are even more expensive then phenoms) and alot of the I5 quads. I do plan on a good overclock 3.4 with cooler I have and around 3.8 to 4.0 once I get a better cooler. The PSU I got was mainly because I had a cheap 680 blow up on me a while ago,and i got it for $90 -$40rebate so I got it for around $50 so it was a good deal.
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December 31, 2011 4:49:16 PM

Nothing AMD has is even close to Intel's i5 quad cores in anything but heavily threaded work loads and there aren't many of those outside of professional software. If this is a gaming machine you should know that gaming is not a heavily threaded workload.

If you paid that little for the PSU and it is a quality PSU then no complaints I was just saying that it is more than necessary. I have my AMD six core (the 1090T BE instead of 1055T) at a little over 4GHz on my Cooler master hyper 212 which is probably a little worse than the hyper 212 Evo.

I can say as an owner of an AMD six core that it is not as good as an Intel quad core in gaming. In fact the AMD quad cores are better than the AMD six cores for gaming because they can have slightly higher clock rates. The six cores are great for programs that can use all six threads effectively but most programs just don't do that yet, forcing the programs to use a smaller number of the much slower Phenom II cores. At the same clock rate a Phenom core is probably about 30-45% slower than an Intel i5 or i7 core so it really hurts program speeds since programs can't use the full six cores.
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December 31, 2011 5:45:34 PM

What temps are you getting on the Hyper 212? Also how is the noise the? Thermal take V1 i have now is loud really loud. As far as performance it should still be a significant jump from my AM2+ 940 chip or at least I hope................
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January 1, 2012 4:13:42 PM

My CPU says it is at 40 degrees Celsius in the BIOS but I don't know about the accuracy of that figure. Sorry I can't check temps under load right now I need to replace the hard drive and I can't afford one.

I can say that the base of the cooler (the part right above the CPU) is almost cool to the touch while I'm in the BIOS So I really don't know.

It is very quiet but once again, I haven't checked anything at full load in a while.


To get my overclock I didn't increase my voltages so it shouldn't run much hotter than it did at stock settings. All I did was increase my BLCK to 250 and reduce my Hyper-Transport and North bridge multipliers from 10 to 8 so they would keep the same 2000MHz frequencies.

I found I could increase my BLCK further to 260 stably and less stably to 265. I can't increase my CPU multiplier or voltage because my motherboard's BIOS refuses to work when I manually change those two settings from auto even if I change them from auto to the correct settings. I think if I update the BIOS it will work but I am lazy and see no point until I get another hard drive anyway.

My CPU is an unlocked BE CPU but the BIOS on my motherboard sucks... Oh well, I'll never buy ECS elite group for an overclocking motherboard again without some serious improvements.
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January 11, 2012 2:49:05 AM

Best answer selected by heavybarnett.
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