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So here's a stupid question i'm sure....

Last response: in Motherboards
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February 21, 2013 9:49:32 PM

if usb 3.0 and sata 3 are all backwards compatible (for the most part, if not all) why are motherboards still coming out with usb 2.0~ and sata 2? what if i want 5 hd's all on sata 3 and have 6 usb 3.0 devices on my system? i mean, is it a money issue? can the parts on the mother board not handle it all? cuz if there is a reason, i'll accept it, but there is nothing anywhere on the web with a answer. i don't even think i have seen a question like this. and if it's too stupid to answer, then a few words would still be appreciated, cuz i would like to start building computers. but i'm in the gathering info and learning stage.

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a c 435 V Motherboard
February 22, 2013 9:28:30 AM

Motherboard chipsets determine what features work. Older chipsets may only support sata II, but some newer more expensive boards have more than one sata controller or usb port. You gotto check out the specs carefully and shop for value.
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a b V Motherboard
February 22, 2013 10:18:07 AM

select best answer after getting correct answer. amd satisfy u r need.
a c 346 V Motherboard
February 22, 2013 2:03:02 PM

sphinxgsx said:
if usb 3.0 and sata 3 are all backwards compatible (for the most part, if not all) why are motherboards still coming out with usb 2.0~ and sata 2? what if i want 5 hd's all on sata 3 and have 6 usb 3.0 devices on my system? i mean, is it a money issue? can the parts on the mother board not handle it all? cuz if there is a reason, i'll accept it, but there is nothing anywhere on the web with a answer. i don't even think i have seen a question like this. and if it's too stupid to answer, then a few words would still be appreciated, cuz i would like to start building computers. but i'm in the gathering info and learning stage.


It is good question.

The answer you got it-the money issue.

Because any changes to the protocol, PHY (chip), connector, and cabling, percolate throughout the design and supply chain, often resulting in significant implementation cost increases.

So even the addition of a single pin to a connector requires IC designers to redesign major portions of their chips to accommodate wider buses. Adapter manufacturers have to reroute boards and backplanes as well as work with completely new connectors. End-users also feel the impact when they have to purchase all new cabling. For example, intel want to change all to sataIII, then they redesign the whole chip and need the money for research. Next the MB manufacturers have to make the new boards and change anything, they need the money too, so intel will pass the costs to MB manufacturers, and MB manufacturers will pass the cost to end-users like us.
a b V Motherboard
February 24, 2013 2:10:43 AM

USB 3.0 does draw a higher bandwidth and a slightly higher power output, it is not recommended to have more than two external devices attached to the USB 3.0 ports so this could be the reason.

Even with older motherboards using USB 2.0, there are still USB 1.1 ports, usually only 2 x USB 2.0 ports were ever available for use at any one time.

For example, Razer have suggested (I can't find the actual link, it's in their blog somewhere) that using 2 x usb 3.0 ports for the mouse and the keyboard could impact on the bandwidth of one or the other and may actually cause delays so they say it is better to just use one or the other in those usb 3.0 ports, the other being in a USB 2.0 port.

With higher bandwidth also comes a higher power requirement on the 5v rail.
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