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Gaming Computer Help

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January 5, 2012 1:25:12 AM

I am fairly new to the world of building computers and I am in the market for a new system. There is so many configurations and parts that it is hard to pick stuff out. I need some help setting up a good system.

Approximate Purchase Date: This Year, able to wait longer.

Budget Range: $1300 Max

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming, Microsoft Office, surfing the web

Parts Not Required: Monitor, OS, Keyboard, Mouse.

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: Newegg.com or TigerDirect.com

Country: United States

Parts Preferences: Intel and Nvidia Combo if possible. Im looking at the I7 2600k

Overclocking: Possibly

SLI or Crossfire: Would like to buy 1 card then put another in later.

Monitor Resolution: 1920 x 1200

Additional Comments: My first system build, i have modified a couple of prebuilt systems before. Would like to get best bang for buck, nothing I don't need. would like to have neat cable management. I might wait for newer parts to come out so I will be as future proof as possible.

More about : gaming computer

a b B Homebuilt system
January 5, 2012 10:32:03 AM

Right now the defacto motherboard standard is either Gigabyte or ASUS with a z68 chip set. All are good, just get the model with the features you need.

Also for most the i5-2500k is a better deal and just as powerful for games.

I would go 8gb DDR3 1600 (2x4gb dual channel kit).

For your resolution anything in the AMD 6850/Nvidia GTX 460 or above would be preferable. This chart should help. Just get the most you can afford. You can also review Tom's video card charts for SLi/Crossfire ratings. http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-graphics-car... , http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/2011-gaming-graphics...

For future SLI, the power supply really depends on which video card you get. For the aforementioned 6850 card, a good 650 watt bronze certified PSU from Antec, Corsair, Silverstone, or Seasonic would do. For the higher end cards, 1000w would not be out of reason. The good news is the newer PSU's are very efficient at low, medium, and high levels. If budget is a concern, you could drop down to the plain 80 plus certified level, but stick to the good brands I mentioned.
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