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Aftermarket replacement battery

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Anonymous
May 9, 2005 1:52:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I got a aftermarket replacement battery for my Olympus Stylus 400
digital camera.

This Stylus 400 original Olympus battery had a model number of LI-10B.
The aftermarket replacement battery states it is a replacement for
LI-10B. However the voltage and ampere-hour ratings are not exactly the
same:

Orignal Olympus LI-10B battery : 3.7V 1090mAH
Aftermarket LI-10B replacement battery: 3.6V 950mAH

Can u advise on whether it is safe to use the aftermarket battery?
Or could it damage the internal motor etc in the camera.

Thanks
Bob
Anonymous
May 9, 2005 4:44:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

bagarow@yahoo.com wrote:


> Orignal Olympus LI-10B battery : 3.7V 1090mAH
> Aftermarket LI-10B replacement battery: 3.6V 950mAH
>
> Can u advise on whether it is safe to use the aftermarket battery?
> Or could it damage the internal motor etc in the camera.

The voltage is so close, it won't make any difference.

The mAH (milliamp hour) rating is less. The mAH rating
defines the capacity of the battery. The lower rating
means the aftermarket battery will become discharged
slightly faster than the original battery with the
higher rating.

Other than that, the battery will be fine.
May 21, 2005 10:40:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

<bagarow@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1115657545.592978.205480@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
>I got a aftermarket replacement battery for my Olympus Stylus 400
> digital camera.
>
>
> Can u advise on whether it is safe to use the aftermarket battery?


Aftermarket batteries from unidentified factories in the Far East,
especially China, have been a big problem for cell phone owners. They have
been known to catch fire, explode or turn very hot while in use. The newer
Lithium Ion batteries are especially volatile. Legitimate manufacturers
incorporate monitoring chips inside the batteries, to slow down or halt the
charge cycle of the battery gets hot. The unbranded "knock-offs" often omit
these protection circuits.

I am not up to speed on whether these problem exist for camera batteries,
but I suspect that they do. Only you can decide if the savings is worth the
risk of possible leakage, overheating or explosion (especially if your
battery is one that can be charged in-camera).

I have found in my own life that whenever I tried to cut corners to save
money, it ended up costing me more than if I had just paid the price for
first quality goods. Your mileage may vary.
Related resources
Anonymous
May 21, 2005 10:40:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Jeremy" <jeremy@nospam.com> writes:
> Aftermarket batteries from unidentified factories in the Far East,
> especially China, have been a big problem for cell phone owners. They have
> been known to catch fire, explode or turn very hot while in use.

FUD, that happens with OEM batteries too. No surprise since they're
the exact same Chinese batteries.

> The newer Lithium Ion batteries are especially volatile. Legitimate
> manufacturers incorporate monitoring chips inside the batteries, to
> slow down or halt the charge cycle of the battery gets hot. The
> unbranded "knock-offs" often omit these protection circuits.

More FUD, the protection circuit is always included or else the number
of failures would be far higher than it is.
May 22, 2005 2:47:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Dunno, but all my Chinese knockoffs have worked brilliantly for over a
year. At six bucks each on eBay they perform equally to my OEM's. at
ten times the price. Given we're talking over a year of heavy use the
price-performance factor is nothing to sneeze at. My only concern is
date of manufacture, and some of the Far Eastern batteries come out of a
black hole without sufficient warranty or information on original
production date.

Paul Rubin wrote:

> "Jeremy" <jeremy@nospam.com> writes:
>
>>Aftermarket batteries from unidentified factories in the Far East,
>>especially China, have been a big problem for cell phone owners. They have
>>been known to catch fire, explode or turn very hot while in use.
>
>
> FUD, that happens with OEM batteries too. No surprise since they're
> the exact same Chinese batteries.
>
>
>>The newer Lithium Ion batteries are especially volatile. Legitimate
>>manufacturers incorporate monitoring chips inside the batteries, to
>>slow down or halt the charge cycle of the battery gets hot. The
>>unbranded "knock-offs" often omit these protection circuits.
>
>
> More FUD, the protection circuit is always included or else the number
> of failures would be far higher than it is.
!