Solved

PSU recommendation when already using good UPS

Hello,
I'm planning on building a Z68 system, but already own an APC Back-UPS RS 1000. Is an 80+ PSU sufficient or should I go for Gold? The system is at the 500W range, would appreciate recommending the most bang for the buck. Thanks!
16 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about recommendation good
  1. I usually go for 80+ bronze or higher. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817151093 would be a strong option. Seasonic is a really good brand.
  2. Best answer
    Make sure that the power supply unit you get is able to work with a UPS that outputs a waveform type of stepped approximation to a sinewave.

    Some power supplies that are incompatible will just cause the UPS to just shut itself down when there is a power interruption and the switchover to battery operation fails. Some have reported that the UPS makes a groaning noise during the attempted switchover before the UPS shuts down.

    What is your system configuration?
  3. ko888 said:
    Make sure that the power supply unit you get is able to work with a UPS that outputs a waveform type of stepped approximation to a sinewave.

    Some power supplies that are incompatible will just cause the UPS to just shut itself down when there is a power interruption and the switchover to battery operation fails. Some have reported that the UPS makes a groaning noise during the attempted switchover before the UPS shuts down.

    What is your system configuration?


    Yikes... I had no idea these things to be considered. I'm planning on an i7-2600, Intel DZ68DB, 8Gb PC-10666, single HD6790 or 6850, SSD, and ODD. Lots of USB devices. Future upgrades would most likely be a HDD. No OCing.
  4. For a system using a single Radeon HD 6790 graphics card AMD specifies a minimum of a 500 Watt or greater power supply. The power supply should also have a combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 27 Amps or greater and have at least two 6-pin PCI Express supplementary power connectors.

    For a system using a single Radeon HD 6850 graphics card AMD specifies a minimum of a 500 Watt or greater power supply. The power supply should also have a combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 27 Amps or greater and have at least one 6-pin PCI Express supplementary power connector.

    Total Power Supply Wattage is NOT the crucial factor in power supply selection!!! Total Continuous Amperage Available on the +12V Rail(s) is the most important factor.

    The Seasonic X-Series 460W (SS-460FL), with its combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 38 Amps and with two 6-pin PCI Express supplementary power connectors, is more than sufficient to power your system configuration with a single Radeon HD 6790 or Radeon HD 6850.

    Seasonic doesn't guarantee UPS compatibility. They recommend testing the PSU with the UPS that you are intending to use it with.
  5. Gold means that you will save a few cents per month on ya electric bill over Bronze.....that is ALL it means. I'd be more concerned w/ ripple and voltage stability.

    With a 550 watt PSU drawing about half that on average.....means an average difference of 5% or about 14 watts......

    14 watts x 20 hours PC use per week x $0.10 per kw-hr x 4.3 weeks per month / 1000 watts per kw = 12 cents per month.


    Here's an article on compatibility

    https://www.dougv.com/2010/03/01/active-pfc-enabled-psus-are-not-compatable-with-most-low-end-ups/
  6. JackNaylorPE said:
    Gold means that you will save a few cents per month on ya electric bill over Bronze.....that is ALL it means. I'd be more concerned w/ ripple and voltage stability.

    With a 550 watt PSU drawing about half that on average.....means an average difference of 5% or about 14 watts......

    14 watts x 20 hours PC use per week x $0.10 per kw-hr x 4.3 weeks per month / 1000 watts per kw = 12 cents per month.


    Here's an article on compatibility

    https://www.dougv.com/2010/03/01/active-pfc-enabled-psus-are-not-compatable-with-most-low-end-ups/


    That's interesting. I've always wondered why in all "recommended" system builds based on a price range, never mention about the use of UPS. I mean power surges are one thing, but nobody wants a complete power off in a blackout. Even sites that gives recommendations to the 'best' PSUs mostly talk about calculating the amount of power needed and the certification. UPS always seem to be left out of the equation. I thought I could save money by getting a lower certification, hoping it would suffice when there's a good quality UPS in the picture. I could be wrong of course.

    Where I'm at, the X-460 differs too little to the X-560, and I've been tempted to go for Gold. Unfortunately, I have to think twice before my money is spent. So you're suggesting a PSU without a built-in PFC? I'm not sure about the details of my APC, I'll have to check that out.
  7. You don't have to use a non-APFC power supply with a simulated sinewave UPS.

    I use a Corsair Professional Series HX750W (CMPSU-750HX) that has Active Power Factor Correction with an APC Back-UPS XS 1300 LCD that outputs a stepped approximation to a sinewave and it works absolutely fine.

    X-bit Labs is one reputable review site that performs a UPS Compatibility test with an APC SmartUPS SC 620 (outputs stepped approximation to a sinewave) when they review a power supply unit. The majority of PSU reviewers don't test for UPS compatibility.

    There are pure sine wave UPS' available like the CyberPower CP1000PFCLCD UPS 1000VA / 600W PFC compatible Pure sine wave for $165.99 USD or the CyberPower CP1350PFCLCD UPS 1350VA / 810W PFC compatible Pure sine wave for $179.99 USD.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16842102132
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16842102133
  8. Yes well this compatibility issue certainly make things harder for me to choose. I suppose I would have to start by asking APC and see where that leads to. My APC model is pretty old. If I do get a specific requirement, I can narrow the choices of compatible PSUs and update here. But at least, from all your responses, I'm convinced I don't need to spend on Gold.
  9. Update.... APC has confirmed, since my UPS is an older model, that I would need to get a passive or no PFC PSU. Browsing Newegg, aside from platinum, bronze PSUs results in Raidmax RX-500/600AF and NZXT Hale82s. They don't sell Raidmax here so I'm left with NZXT, with 2 PCI-E 6-pin and +12V@53A. Several PSUs without certification have inadequate connectors and +12V amps.
  10. bybwn said:
    Update.... APC has confirmed, since my UPS is an older model, that I would need to get a passive or no PFC PSU. Browsing Newegg, aside from platinum, bronze PSUs results in Raidmax RX-500/600AF and NZXT Hale82s. They don't sell Raidmax here so I'm left with NZXT, with 2 PCI-E 6-pin and +12V@53A. Several PSUs without certification have inadequate connectors and +12V amps.

    Where is here? You don't want a Raidmax power supply, they're junk.

    The NZXT HALE82 Series 650W (HALE82-650-M) is made by Seasonic.

    X-bit labs UPS Compatibility test
    The HALE82 series PSUs all showed the same behavior with our uninterruptible power supply (APC SmartUPS SC 620). They were stable at loads up to 365-375 watts when powered by the mains and could switch to the UPS’s batteries at 285-290 watts.
  11. ko888 said:
    Where is here? You don't want a Raidmax power supply, they're junk.

    The NZXT HALE82 Series 650W (HALE82-650-M) is made by Seasonic.

    X-bit labs UPS Compatibility test
    The HALE82 series PSUs all showed the same behavior with our uninterruptible power supply (APC SmartUPS SC 620). They were stable at loads up to 365-375 watts when powered by the mains and could switch to the UPS’s batteries at 285-290 watts.


    Jakarta, Indonesia. I've read the review @ Xbit and the only issue being fan noise.
  12. I don't know, I've never had an issue with PFC power supplies and my Backup 1500 or Backup BN1250G, but that's not saying there are some that aren't more picky.
  13. It's usually the design and implementation of the active PFC circuit that will determine whether or not the PSU can deal with a simulated sine wave.

    I've noticed that a lot of PSUs that use Sirtec as its OEM have a problem with simulated sine wave UPS'.

    The majority of computer users don't use a UPS so the report of PSU incompatibilities is almost nonexistent.
  14. Thanks to ko888 and JackNaylorPE for giving me the heads-up on PSU-UPS compatibility. I never would've confirmed to APC otherwise.
  15. Thanks to ko888 and JackNaylorPE for giving me the heads-up on PSU-UPS compatibility. I never would've confirmed to APC otherwise.
  16. Best answer selected by bybwn.
Ask a new question

Read More

Power Supplies Components Product