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P8Z68-V PRO ( I5) Windows 7 32bit or 64 Bit

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January 8, 2012 5:55:16 PM

I am building a PC using a P8Z68-V PRO, I5 Processor, 8GB Ram.

I plan to purchase Windows 7 Professional but seek advice whether to install 32 bit or 64 bit?

All my applications to date are 32 bit but am thinking longer term and would appreciate any advice regarding anything else too that I should consider regarding the Windows 7 installation?

Thanks In advance
January 8, 2012 6:23:30 PM

You can't use more than ~3 GB of RAM on 32 bit OS so you should definitely go with 64 bit.
January 8, 2012 6:30:24 PM

32bit won't let you to add more than 3gb ram you have great and fastest stuff your system suites with windows 7 64bit.
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a b $ Windows 7
January 8, 2012 7:09:36 PM

A 32bit OS can only "see" 4GB of RAM so you need the 64bit version to make use of your 8GB of RAM. It also is more efficient using memory.

You will be able to run your 32bit applications just fine on Windows 7 x64. I have run Windows 7 x64 since the early beta days and have never had a problem. The only problems I am aware of are running very old 16bit stuff. So anything considered old by XP standards. Some older hardware might not have 64bit drivers as well.
January 8, 2012 10:04:00 PM

Hello

Thanks for all the responses, great.

I knew there was a reason for going 64bit, but no matter how hard I tried I just don't have the memory !!!

Excuse the pun.
:) 

When I purchased the board and 8Gb memory, that was explained to me in the store, as I want a fast machine for video editing ..... rendering takes ages on my current XP machine.

I've always been under the impression the more ram the better as software loads and runs in ram more efficiently the more ram the less use of hard drive needed.

The board takes maximum of 32Mb Ram ...... would that be overkill?

:D 


a b $ Windows 7
January 8, 2012 10:32:02 PM

If rendering is going to be your main use I would go with 16GB of RAM at least and even 32GB would not be massive overkill, especially since DDR3 is dirt cheap right now. If you do buy more make sure to buy if not the same kit then at least the same brand, voltage, speed and timings.

You also would do well to check out the i7 2600/2700k if you have not bought a processor yet. Rendering is one of the few things that can take advantage of the extra 4 threads Hyperthreading gives you. The i5 will still work great but the i5 is 4 cores 4 threads while the i7 is 4 cores 8 threads.


Also if it is in your budget an SSD will make a big difference as well.
January 9, 2012 11:14:13 AM

errorpipelistening said:
Hello

Thanks for all the responses, great.

I knew there was a reason for going 64bit, but no matter how hard I tried I just don't have the memory !!!

Excuse the pun.
:) 

When I purchased the board and 8Gb memory, that was explained to me in the store, as I want a fast machine for video editing ..... rendering takes ages on my current XP machine.

I've always been under the impression the more ram the better as software loads and runs in ram more efficiently the more ram the less use of hard drive needed.

The board takes maximum of 32Mb Ram ...... would that be overkill?

:D 

adding the more ram will not improve your softwares loading duration yes the heavy multithreaded apps basically requires 16gb of memory but in this case only 25 to 30% performance increase with ram the more excellent solution is (SSD) get 128gb like m4 crucial or OCZ vertex this can improve alot your whole system boot time too fast as you didn't imagine.
January 13, 2012 4:35:22 AM

anort3 and xtreme5

Sorry for the late response.
Thanks for the reply and explanation.
I've been out of order with the cold :( 

Crucial CT128M4SSD2 128GB M4 SSD
I've been looking at the SSD suggestion, sounds great.

I'm not sure how I would mount it in my ATX Form Factor case.
I read somewhere I'd need to get an adaptor, but Google doesn't seem to find any search results. Any ideas?

I can understand fast boot because it's a Solid State Device but are you also suggesting that the full 128GB drive be used only for Windows 7 installation for boot purposes?

Thanks again.

:D 
a b $ Windows 7
January 13, 2012 5:10:47 AM

My older 120GB Vertex 2 came with an adaptor and the M4 does as well. Nothing to worry about there.

I have Windows 7 x64 Ultimate, Office 2007 and other programs as well as 10 or 12 games on my SSD and I still have 35GB free.

I keep all my music and pictures and video on my other 2 storage drives ( as well as backed up on an external, you can never be too redundant! ) so basically anything that runs is on my SSD.

Even my year and a half old SATA 3 Vertex 2 is so fast Windows boots in under 15 seconds. Shutdowns are almost instant.

I have to say as far as overall system responsiveness I have never added anything to my computer that made as big a difference as the SSD did.


Just plug it into a Intel SATA 6 port ( by itself, the storage drives should be added after Windows installation ) install Windows and you are ready to go.
January 13, 2012 10:12:42 AM

anort3 Thanks Again

The SSD definately sounds impressive.

:D 
February 4, 2012 9:05:41 PM

Anort Wrote:

Quote:
Also if it is in your budget an SSD will make a big difference as well.


Hey Anort
I've been keeping an eye out fopr bargain SSD's but gee will they ever comdown in price...
I mean the 250GB and above.

I so want one

:bounce: 
a b $ Windows 7
February 4, 2012 9:18:31 PM

errorpipelistening said:
Anort Wrote:

Quote:
Also if it is in your budget an SSD will make a big difference as well.


Hey Anort
I've been keeping an eye out fopr bargain SSD's but gee will they ever comdown in price...
I mean the 250GB and above.

I so want one

:bounce: 


I think it will still be a while before the large capacity SSDs come down in price. If you find a really good sale you can get a 120GB high end one for less than $180. I paid $225 for my Vertex 2 120GB a year and a half ago so prices have come down just a bit. Especially considering how much faster the new drives are compared to my old one.
February 4, 2012 10:24:34 PM

Ah, some Cosmic Ordering is needed ! :D 

I'm convinced, definately getting one.

Cheers Anort
February 7, 2012 4:32:55 PM

Anort Wrote:
Quote:
Just plug it into a Intel SATA 6 port ( by itself, the storage drives should be added after Windows installation ) install Windows and you are ready to go.


It's on order .....

I didn't quite understand you comment within the brackets.
Please explain a little further.

Thanks In advance.

:D 
a b $ Windows 7
February 7, 2012 4:50:15 PM

Meaning just have the SSD ( and the DVD/CD ROM ) drive the only ones plugged in while installing Windows. Then plug in any storage drives after the install.

The motherboard should have SATA 2 ( 3Gb/s ) and SATA 3 ( 6Gb/s ) ports. Use a SATA 3 ( 6Gb/s ) port for the SSD and a SATA 2 port for the optical drive. Your motherboard manual should tell you what is what. The will be diferent colors as well. The mechanical hard drive can go in either. It's not fast enough to benefit from the faster SATA 3 ports.

Also when you first boot after plugging in the SSD make sure that in BIOS your SATA ports are configured to AHCI mode and not IDE. Do this before trying to install Windows.
February 7, 2012 5:35:20 PM

Anort

Thanks for the reply.

Sorry, when I wrote Sata 6 I meant Sata 3 (I was thinking 6gb/s) :??: 


Ah, right... I assume that the reason being, having only the SSD connected means that Windows automatically install directly to it.

I've been trying to work out in general terms Sata 2,3,6 interchangeable compatibility issues.

Are they compatible in any way?

Thanks again

:D 





a b $ Windows 7
February 7, 2012 5:53:09 PM

I just call it a SATA port unless I am referring to a specific speed.

SATA 1 = 1.5Gb/s

SATA 2 = 3.0Gb/s

SATA 3 = 6.0Gb/s

All are backwards compatible and only an SSD can fully saturate a SATA 3 ports bandwidth. Mechanical hard drives do not even use SATA 2 bandwidth except in bursts.

The Wiki article is pretty comprehensive.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_ATA
February 7, 2012 6:01:29 PM

Anort

Thanks for taking the time to explain and providing the link
to our friend WIKI..... I can't believe I didn't visit there.... it's normally my first port of call.

Thanks yet once again

:D 
a b $ Windows 7
February 7, 2012 6:07:11 PM

Not a problem. If you have any more questions feel free to ask.
April 29, 2012 8:44:52 PM

Hello Anort

My PC using a P8Z68-V PRO, I5 Processor, 8GB Ram.
I got a crucial M4 and wow what adifference.

:D 

Everything has been fine until to night.
When the PC was rendering video for me I got a CPD temperature warning in my system tray.
(Asus Monitor balloon)

The temperature had risen to 78 Degrees.
I closed several running applications immediately and the temperature dropped to 62 degrees.

What is considered an acceptable CPU temperature?

Will subjecting the I5 to 78 degrees have done any damage?

What might I be overlooking?

Thanks in advance
!