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Help - $1100 All Terrain PC ?

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January 9, 2012 5:41:59 AM

Approximate Purchase Date: any day from Jan to March

Budget Range:
$1000-1100

System Usage from Most to Least Important: I'm more into gaming, but I do everything, from simple things as notepad to do high cpu tasks such as encoding, rendering, compiling...

Parts Not Required: (e.g.: keyboard, mouse, monitor, speakers, OS, HardDisk, Case)

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: Amazon only please :/ 

Parts Preferences: Intel Asus Gigabyte Corsair Nvidia evga - I bet you know this better than me (:

Overclocking: Not really needed

SLI or Crossfire: No

Monitor Resolution: 1440x900

Additional Comments: So I just want a PC that lasts years, and is upgradeable... I don't know if I can upgrade it more than this and now with the new slot already launched, so I'm undecided if buy now or wait for the new slot (LGA 2011) to low its prices ):

This is what I selected most of them were site recommendations :lol:  but, I really want that processor, I was thinking to buy the 2700k, even when someone told me that i7 burn motherboards is this true ? :whistle: 

If you have better experiences, change everything I want the best of these at a good price

CPU - $294.99
Intel Core i7-2600K Processor
http://www.amazon.com/Intel-BX80623I72600K-Core-i7-2600...

Motherboard - $222.78

I Always select motherboards with integrated video, just incase the pci one dies, but if you trust the build will last long enough you can tell me what motherboard without it is better than this or even mobos with it, but USB 3 is a musthave

ASUS LGA 1155 - Z68 - Intel Z68 ATX DDR3 2200 LGA 1155 Motherboards P8Z68-V PRO/GEN3
http://www.amazon.com/ASUS-LGA-1155-Motherboards-P8Z68-...

RAM - $85.99
Corsair Vengeance Blue 16 GB DDR3
http://www.amazon.com/Corsair-Vengeance-Channel-Memory-...


PSU - $99.24
Corsair Enthusiast TX V2 Series 650-Watt
http://www.amazon.com/Corsair-Enthusiast-Certified-Perf...


Geforce 560 I don't know which video to choose



Addtional I can buy it later if not really needed
A cooling system non-liquid for cpu
And maybe a blue ray writer/reader


Hoping everything is understandable :lol: 
Thanks!

More about : 1100 terrain

January 9, 2012 11:10:48 PM

Seems like a good start to me... I'm not a big nVidia guy - but from what everybody says the GTX 560 TI is solid pick for around $200. IMHO the 2700K you want isn't worth it. You said you weren't super into overclocking, but a decent cpu cooler and I doubt you'd notice a difference between the two.
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 9, 2012 11:49:20 PM

The 2700K is not worth the money (I'm tempted to say in this price range but it's basically true at any price). Don't get it. I have heard no problems with i7's and motherboards.

Now, if gaming is your priority then downgrading to the i5-2500K will give you back $100 that you can put toward a better GPU and you will sacrifice no gaming performance. However, there are two good reasons not to do that. The first is that the i7-2600K is better at multithreaded tasks like encoding and rendering. The i5-2500K is still a very good chip for those things, but the i7-2600K is better. The second is that you're gaming on a pretty low resolution and a graphics card higher than a GTX 560ti (or equivalently an HD 6950 1GB) will not really help you much in new games at resolutions that low. If you plan on getting a new monitor in the next two years, though, I would spend the money on a better card than the GTX 560ti or the HD 6950 1GB.

You can save some money in a couple of places. First, unless you know that you need 16GB of RAM for something you might want to start with 8GB (in a 2x4GB kit). Very few things need more than 8GB (though there are some) and you can always add another 8GB later. You can also get a cheaper motherboard. I have that motherboard (the non-gen3 version) and it's good, but there are motherboards in the $125 range that perform just as well. My favorite is the ASRock Z68 Extreme3 Gen3. The difference between that board and the ~$200 boards is just some extra bells and whistles like extra ports in the cluster and a usb 3.0 header. I needed those things (several peripherals) so I spent the extra money but if you don't need the extra features then you can go with the Extreme3 for the same performance.

Be sure to note that the GTX 560 and the GTX 560ti are different cards and the 560ti is better and worth the extra money. In this price range a 560ti should be considered the minimum and you can certainly fit a 570 with some of the adjustments above.

Another thing you might consider is getting an i5-2500K, 8GB of RAM (in a 2x4GB kit), the Extreme3 motherboard, the PSU that you mentioned, and a 560ti. Then you can use the money that you save to get a new monitor. You will absolutely notice the difference between 1440x900 and 1920x1080 (even if it means lowering some of your graphics settings).
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January 10, 2012 5:59:40 PM

Wow thanks for those reply,

I always wanted the 590 but that's too much money I Can pay max $500 for a video card, so the 570 or 580 ? I don't know if I should try ATi, The 2 ATi i had died burnt without overclocking :/ 

If you can link me from amazon any good cards that will do a good job with my resolution or a bit less! thanks!

And changing some things after your recommendations what about this

[Motherboards]

GIGABYTE GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3 - $165.30
and this mobo
http://www.amazon.com/Gigabyte-Intel-DDR3-Motherboards-...

or the asrock you said ? $184.99
http://www.amazon.com/ASRock-MB-Z68X4G3-Intel-Z68-Mothe...

or even any asus, i believe asus is a better choice for any motherboards $184.99
http://www.amazon.com/ASUS-LGA-1155-Motherboards-P8Z68-...

[/Motherboards]

so that plus

PSU - $99.24
RAM 8 GB - $48

and processor
i7 2600k or a i5 2500k and still under $1200 right ? (I said max 1100 but i can pay a bit more no problem) amazon prices go up and down so no idea If i'm gonna save or pay more any different day week or month.. so if needed I can sacrifice the i7 and buy the i5

what do you think?

I already have a monitor, so I could buy a new monitor later not really need it now :)  I'm just tired of this Pentium 4 with no graphic card lol.... 7 years
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January 10, 2012 7:54:05 PM

Go for the ASUS mobo for sure- I (and many others) have had great luck with them. The 2600k more than likely will push you over 1100, but if hyperthreading is something you think you may need then I'd pull the trigger on it. Either is a great choice though.

Ati 6870 video card will give great performance for the price. Tom's Reviews recommend it for the price.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005C31F2M?ie=UTF8&for...

Or if your case is on the warm side there is a dual fan version
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004O0OKXK?ie=UTF8&for...

They can handle most games on max settings. If you are nervous though, don't let $50 change your mind from a 570 if it's what you want.
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 10, 2012 8:30:40 PM

Those motherboards you mentioned are all good choices. The ASRock that you linked is not the same one that I mentioned - it looks like the next step up which is the Extreme4 instead of the Extreme3 - and it s good choice. ASUS is a great brand with a great reputation but the Extreme4 tends to win more performance benchmarks. I own a model very similar to the ASUS that you linked and I am very happy with it. If I were overclocking and/or a big gamer, though, I would have gone with the Extreme4 though.

The i7-2600K and the i5-2500K both have the same clock speeds (a 100mhz difference is nothing) and the same number of cores. The difference between the two is that the 2600K has "hyperthreading" which means that it uses the four cores to make eight virtual threads (two per core). This increases performance in applications that can utilize several threads. Such applications include photo and video editing applications, rendering applications, several engineering applications and others. Games, however, do not get benefit from the extra threads (as of right now). That all being said - if you use applications that can use the hyperthreading often enough then go for it. If you only use them occasionally, though, then put that extra money toward a graphics card.

About graphics cards. The Radeon 6870 that bjones37 mentioned is going to give you pretty good performance in most games at your resolution and is not a bad choice. However, it is considered a budget card and if you're going to ever get a 1920x1080 resolution monitor to use with this machine then you should spend more. I wouldn't buy a 590 - they're not really worth the money (if you can even find them). A 560ti (or a 6950) will play every game I can think of at max settings on your resolution and they both fare well at higher resolutions. The 570 and the 580 are both worth the money if you want to spend it and as of a week ago the 580 was the fastest single-gpu gaming card you can buy. It is worth mentioning that the 7970's are out and run about $550. I haven't seen an official benchmark yet, but the numbers I've look impressive. Also keep in mind that as you upgrade your card you're going to have to take heat and power into consideration.

@bjones37 - did you typo? The price difference between a 6870 and a 570 is not $50.
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January 10, 2012 9:25:29 PM

@danraies - sorry, didn't clarify that ... I figured that I he went with a 570 he'd get a 2500k. If he went with a 2600k he'd try the 6870... That's about $50 for a better graphics card
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 10, 2012 9:59:53 PM

bjones37 said:
@danraies - sorry, didn't clarify that ... I figured that I he went with a 570 he'd get a 2500k. If he went with a 2600k he'd try the 6870... That's about $50 for a better graphics card


Oh, ok. Yeah, that makes more sense.
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January 10, 2012 10:14:58 PM

hmm ok ok, I made some choices about the card after I saw the charts here ( i didn't notice before :whistle:  ) and what you said about the monitor, because yes i'm planing to buy a new one later, but not very soon

I could go for the one I'm mentioning down but, I just don't like the 2 or 3 weeks shipping from amazon :cry: 

or I could save the money and buy that ati or the 570 but I feel those are going to be outdated fast! and I want it to last long enough

so, e.g.

If I buy this card

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004L9MBEY/ref=olp_pro...

using for example the i7 running a game full details and at my resolution

I'll need more than the Corsair Enthusiast TX V2 Series 650-Watt to keep the pc alive?



also thanks so much for helping me out, I have learned a lot I was very outdated about this (Y)
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January 10, 2012 10:52:48 PM

Here is what I'd build with the current budget you're working with (along with your primary uses etc.)

CPU - Intel Core i5 2500 3.3Ghz - 216USD (Roughly)
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004EBUXI0/ref=s9_hps_...

MOBO - ASRock LGA1155/ Intel Z68 Extreme 4 - 170USD (Roughly)
http://www.amazon.com/ASRock-Z68-CrossFireX-Motherboard...

PSU - Corsair Professional Series Gold 750-Watt 80 Plus Gold Certified CMPSU-750AX - 144USD (Roughly)
http://www.amazon.com/Corsair-Professional-750-Watt-Cer...

GPU - SAPPHIRE AMD Radeon HD 6870 1GB GDDR5 PCIE Graphics Card - 164USD (Roughly)
http://www.amazon.com/SAPPHIRE-Radeon-6870-GDDR5-Graphi...

For your OS drive I'd really recommend you get an SSD here is the one I'd recommend
(I realize you said you had a hard disk but... I'd really recommend a SSD)


SSD - Intel 510 Series 120 GB SATA Version 3 2.5-Inch Solid-State Drive by Intel - 275USD (Roughly)
http://www.amazon.com/Intel-Version-2-5-Inch-Solid-Stat...

RAM - Corsair Vengeance 8 GB ( 2 x 4 GB ) DDR3 1600 MHz - USD 39 (USD Roughly)
http://www.amazon.com/Corsair-Vengeance-240-Pin-Platfor...

The total of all these parts I've listed comes to 1008 USD (Roughly) when you purchase them all on amazon like requested. I noticed you said you wanted this to last awhile that's also partially why I recommend you using a Intel SSD for your OS drive. Intel has amazing reliability for their SSD's and the performance of the Intel 510 Elmcrest SSD SATA 6Gbps SSD is top tier performance as well. So trust me going with a SSD is totally worth the big price. I realize you'll need more storage than 120Gb though but I noticed you said you already had a hard disk so I figured you could just use that for slave storage.

But please buy an SSD, Because if you really want to future proof your build then trust me you NEED a SSD. In my personal experience adding a SSD to pretty much any system will improve it's performance anywhere from 30-60 percent. So please trust me and buy the SSD for running your OS and apps etc.

Also if you notice the PSU I picked out is plenty of power and it's also top of the line. Its also gold rated, and it's had really great reviews. I personally own this PSU and I love it.
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 11, 2012 12:56:14 AM

I really disagree with ComputerNovice. In the price range that you're considering I can't justify $275 on an SSD. I agree that an SSD is a gigantic system upgrade. However an SSD will do nothing to improve gaming fps and in $1000 worth of parts there are other places that the money should go. Also, the Intel 510 drives are really overpriced. I agree that reliability and longevity are really important, but a Crucial M4 or a Samsung 830 will be extremely reliable. The 64GB versions of those two drives are usually a little over $100. 64GB is really small, but it's enough for your OS and you can store games and other applications on a different drive. SSD's are awesome and it's a night-and-day difference between an HDD but I couldn't justify $275 of $1000 on one. It's also simple to add an SSD later if you're willing to reinstall Windows.

Also...the PSU that ComputerNovice chose is a great unit but it's far more power than the rest of the configuration needs. The Corsair CX500 will power that system with room to spare and is listed at $60 on newegg (the AX750 is $170 on newegg).

In regards to MiervaFy's last post, if you can afford a GTX 580 and an i7-2600K then you will have a killer machine but you will go well past $1000. Like I said, unless the 7970 beats the 580 (which we don't know yet), the 580 and the 2600K is the most powerful gaming configuration an enthusiast can buy. Keep in mind - that configuration is absolute overkill on your current monitor but it won't be when you upgrade.

The Corsair TX650 will run one 580 but it will not run two of them. If you want to use SLI in the future you'll need at least 850W. I have to mention that there is much more to a power supply than total wattage. What is really important is the amount of power on the +12V rail which powers most of your system. Almost all of that power comes from the CPU and graphics card. Your CPU uses about 11amps and a single GTX 580 uses about 23amps. Thus to run one 580 you'll need about 34amps plus some room to spare on the +12V rail and to run two you'll need about 57amps plus some room to spare. The TX650 has 53amps on the +12V rail and so can run one GTX 580. The Corsair TX850 has 70amps on the +12V rail which can power two 580's.

EDIT: I fixed some math in the last paragraph.
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January 11, 2012 2:47:48 AM

danraies said:
I really disagree with ComputerNovice. In the price range that you're considering I can't justify $275 on an SSD. I agree that an SSD is a gigantic system upgrade. However an SSD will do nothing to improve gaming fps and in $1000 worth of parts there are other places that the money should go. Also, the Intel 510 drives are really overpriced. I agree that reliability and longevity are really important, but a Crucial M4 or a Samsung 830 will be extremely reliable. The 64GB versions of those two drives are usually a little over $100. 64GB is really small, but it's enough for your OS and you can store games and other applications on a different drive. SSD's are awesome and it's a night-and-day difference between an HDD but I couldn't justify $275 of $1000 on one. It's also simple to add an SSD later if you're willing to reinstall Windows.

Also...the PSU that ComputerNovice chose is a great unit but it's far more power than the rest of the configuration needs. The Corsair CX500 will power that system with room to spare and is listed at $60 on newegg (the AX750 is $170 on newegg).

In regards to MiervaFy's last post, if you can afford a GTX 580 and an i7-2600K then you will have a killer machine but you will go well past $1000. Like I said, unless the 7970 beats the 580 (which we don't know yet), the 580 and the 2600K is the most powerful gaming configuration an enthusiast can buy. Keep in mind - that configuration is absolute overkill on your current monitor but it won't be when you upgrade.

The Corsair TX650 will run one 580 but it will not run two of them. If you want to use SLI in the future you'll need at least 850W. I have to mention that there is much more to a power supply than total wattage. What is really important is the amount of power on the +12V rail which powers most of your system. Almost all of that power comes from the CPU and graphics card. Your CPU uses about 11amps and a single GTX 580 uses about 23amps. Thus to run one 580 you'll need about 34amps plus some room to spare on the +12V rail and to run two you'll need about 57amps plus some room to spare. The TX650 has 53amps on the +12V rail and so can run one GTX 580. The Corsair TX850 has 70amps on the +12V rail which can power two 580's.

EDIT: I fixed some math in the last paragraph.

Honestly I chose Intel because he said he wanted it to last. He also mentioned he does some video stuff which would indeed benefit from the SSD. Depending on if he edits anything. Also the thought behind the extra power on the PSU is because he might want to add some things to the system or add a 2nd GPU or something to that effect at some point. Which would put his power needs around 650w. The other thought behind the nice PSU is that it's one of Corsair's top of the line PSUs and once again he said he wants it to last. Most times with lower end stuff the capacitors on the PSU's age much more quickly. Now trust me I fully understand pretty much any Corsair PSU is good and will run for a long time so your choice is a good one as well. Your SSD choices appear to be good too, I'd just personally want a bigger one but I might just spoiled.

So since he said "future proof" I figured I'd take him at his word. But I understand your point just figured I'd explain mine. To each his own
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January 12, 2012 1:58:12 AM

thanks for the recommendations and I will buy a SSD drive but not this time, My priorities now are fps and cpu speed, I been living with a slow pentium 4 and IDE drive for 7 years so It doesn't really matter yet. Games and OS can take forever to load but the end result is what I really want, I can maybe buy that PSU just in case, since i'lll be adding some optical drives and maybe other stuff, but only If some prices go down.

And I doubt I will buy other card to use SLI or Crossfire, I maybe end selling it to buy any of the new pci 3.0 videocards coming


Thanks danraies bjones37 and ComputerNovice, I think I made a decision thank to all your advices! I'll keep investigating a bit about the video cards while I wait for amazon to down some prices like it did some days ago and then order!

Many many thanks!
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January 12, 2012 4:30:40 AM

Best answer selected by MiervaFy.
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