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Using Case Fan Controller vs. Motherboard Fan Controller

Last response: in Components
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April 21, 2012 3:13:25 PM

I have just about completed my build, just waiting on an Ivy Bridge CPU.

I have the CM Storm Trooper case (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811119245) which has 4 case fans and has a fan controller built into the front panel.

I also have the ASUS P8Z77-V PRO motherboard (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131819), which has 4 - 4 pin fan connectors. It has ASUS Fan Xpert 2 to control the fans.

So I wanted to ask about the advantage of using the fan controller in the case vs. the one built into the motherboard. Using the case one would only allow me to adjust the fans manually from the front panel I assume. This is my first motherboard with fan control built in, so I don't know what ASUS Fan Xpert 2 allows me to do. I'm hoping it measures the temperature and runs the fans only as fast as required to cool it to a safe level.

The fans have a 3 pin header which seems to be able to either plug into the 3 pin connectors from the case fan controller or into 3 pins on the 4 pin headers on the motherboard.

Any recommendations in which way to go?

Thanks.
a b ) Power supply
a b V Motherboard
April 21, 2012 3:33:19 PM

got the same case and went with a fan controller for more precise airflow/noise levels

as the built in fan controller only has low-medium or high

used this one which can change the leds to different colours--red works great with the storm trooper

tried fan expert but wasnt too happy with it--asus AI suite kept giving me error messages that my temperature was

213c and other rubbish

http://www.scan.co.uk/products/nzxt-sentry-mix-led-illu...
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April 22, 2012 7:09:20 PM

How about the rest of you, do you recommend using the motherboard fan control or the case fan controller?

Have others had trouble with the ASUS Fan Xpert 2?

I already have two forms of fan control, so I really don't want to buy yet another fan controller.

Thanks.
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April 22, 2012 8:16:30 PM

i think you would probably want to get some temp monitoring software and test both to see which you lik ebetter or which works more efficiently, with manual ones you usually want a temp sensor on the fan controller or as software. just a bit more to manage than the automatic one in the mobo.
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Best solution

May 20, 2012 7:19:34 PM

I suggest using the motherboard fan control. 4-pin fan headers are backwards-compatible with 3-pin connectors, if you didn't know that already.

With you case fan controller, it's manual so you have to remember to crank up the fans under load, then turn them back down.

With fan xpert 2, you can adjust the fan curve, or % of fan speed for temperature (ex: 100% @ 65C or 80% @ 55C), or have a target cpu temperature, like 60˚C. That will automatically adjust fan speed based on you cpu temperature. After making all the settings, cooling will be provided when needed, such as gaming or video editing, and at idle, your system will be near-silent.
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May 21, 2012 12:23:54 AM

Best answer selected by gkendall.
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August 5, 2012 5:25:37 PM

storminthenorman said:
I suggest using the motherboard fan control. 4-pin fan headers are backwards-compatible with 3-pin connectors, if you didn't know that already.

With you case fan controller, it's manual so you have to remember to crank up the fans under load, then turn them back down.

With fan xpert 2, you can adjust the fan curve, or % of fan speed for temperature (ex: 100% @ 65C or 80% @ 55C), or have a target cpu temperature, like 60˚C. That will automatically adjust fan speed based on you cpu temperature. After making all the settings, cooling will be provided when needed, such as gaming or video editing, and at idle, your system will be near-silent.


I thought only 4-pin connections allow the mobo to control fan speed. Everything I've read has said that 3-pin connections can only run the fans at 100%
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