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Need buy or build advice, 2500-3000 budget gaming pc

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January 9, 2012 5:00:18 PM

I have once built a pc but that was around five years ago and now I am looking to either build another one or purchase a built one from cyberpc or something. I don't think I would have any problems building one but it has been a long time since I have kept up with any type of new technology so I have some questions if I can get any advice.

1. SSD and HDD, I don't fully understand what a SSD does but from what I can tell it is used as a separate drive to store large commanly used files to be able to load faster than normal. And if so how much performance does this add, and any recommendations because all the different options boggle my mind.

2. Video cards, should I be looking at going with two mid range cards or should I go with one high range like 580 or the 6970? Or is it reasonable or even usefull to go with two high range cards like two 6970's?

3. Mobo, in this case I don't know much of anything except make sure it is compatible with the rest of the items. But one question i have is to wether i should make sure it is compatible to upgrade to the new ivey processor? Is it going to be a big enough change later to upgrade to?

4. CPU, here I am thinking about going with this Intel® Core™ i7-980 3.33 GHz Six Cores 12M Intel Smart Cache LGA1366. Just read good reviews and It seems to be correct, but is there anything overly important that I may be overlooking in this case.

5. Power supply, I plan on going with a 1000w because the reason my last build had problems in the end was from the power supply, but this maybe excessive if I don't go with two video cards correct?

6. Case and cooling, here is something I know very little about other than make sure it is big enough and cool enough. Is it hard to install liquid cooling, and is it worth it? Any recommendations on brands of cases?

7. Would it be easier and smarter for me to just purchase one froze somewhere that builds them and go with their warranty and guarantee for the extra money? I would like to build one and don't think it would be to difficult since I did it once before, but I am just wondering if spending this much money if it would enter worth just purchasing one with a full warranty.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
January 9, 2012 5:11:56 PM

1. The idea of a Solid-State Drive is so you spend less time loading the OS/Applications and more time using them.

2. Since the new 7970 is out, I would go to Amazon and buy it. :p 
3. I honestly don't know. Maybe someone who knows more on this can help.
4. Unless you're video editing, get the i5-2500k. No difference in gaming.
5. Yes, it is excessive if you don't Crossfire/SLI.
6. Idk about liquid cooling, but the HAF and LIAN LI cases are good.
7. Honestly, building your own yourself will get you better quality parts.
January 9, 2012 5:17:02 PM

1) A solid state drive has no moving parts and reads/writes much faster than a typical HDD. Most people who buy one get it to put Windows and their games on, and then put media and other files on a regular hard drive.

2) I'd recommend a single higher-end card like a GTX 580 at your budget range.

3+4) First things first, the i7-980 is an obsolete chip in an obsolete socket. You will get substantially better performance from an i7-2600k for $750 less. The current Intel socket is LGA1155, which will support Ivy Bridge if you choose to upgrade your processor down the road.

5) 1000W is probably overkill (~850W should be plenty) unless you plan to add a second high-end graphics card down the line. Here is where brand is important -- high-end power supplies from Corsair or Kingwin are a good choice at your price point.

6) Liquid cooling is unnecessary unless you are going for an outrageous overclock. The new Intel chips overclock very well with just air cooling -- a $25 cooler should get you 4.5-4.6GHz without too much trouble. There are many good mid-tower cases from $90-$150; good choice include the HAF 922, NZXT Phantom, and Corsair 600T.

7) I would recommend building your own -- you can guarantee you get higher quality parts, and you'll generally save money over ordering a custom machine. All reputable companies have warranties/return policies on the components you order.


EDIT: here is an example high-end build, still clocking in at only $1700:

Related resources
January 9, 2012 5:18:55 PM

Just check out the System Builder Marathon articles on the website. They update them regularly.
What's do you mean by 2500-3000? Dollars? If so, $3000 is not a "budget" built. If the primary purpose is gaming, then you don't need anywhere near that type of horsepower.
January 9, 2012 5:20:01 PM

3.make sure its z68 i recommend http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... 6. not really nessesary unless your extreme overclocking for now just get the hyper evo 212 1. ssd is super good it can load applications super fast and yes get the 7970 5. 850 is enough for sli or crossfire 7. build it yourself if you want it to be better preformance and quality
January 9, 2012 5:21:41 PM

A short summary:
Core i5 2500K
Z68 Mobo. Like the ones from Asus. They have updates for the new line of Ivy Bridge CPU's. Also be on the lookout for ones with PCI-e 3.0 Slots
For the GPU I'd suggest a Corsair or Antec 750W power supply
Cooling... Don't know much about water cooling, but get a case with good airflow and the CoolerMaster 212 Evo for you CPU and you are good to go
120/240Gb SSD (whatever floats your boat)
Then spend your precious money on any fluff that you'd like to have. Blu Ray rom and all that. Rich bugger.
January 9, 2012 5:22:32 PM

4. i7-980x is a dead processor with a dead socket get the i7-2600k or you will ruin your build also for case there is the azza 900 or 300 or rosewill 1100 or haf there are plenty of good cases from good to extreme looking and pricy
January 9, 2012 5:57:46 PM

The Obsidian 650D or 800D are good if you want water cooling, they have LOADS of space
January 9, 2012 5:58:11 PM

Also, with that kind of budget, seriously consider 2 or even 3 7970s
January 9, 2012 7:46:39 PM

This has been a huge help, really glad I asked about the CPU. The one thing I am still not it sure about is what I should go with on video cards. Is one 7970 or 580 going to be all that I need or should I go with two.

If its not going to matter much then I would rather spend the money on a new monitor and a couple of other accessories.
January 10, 2012 1:59:40 AM

sgtpepperlhc said:
This has been a huge help, really glad I asked about the CPU. The one thing I am still not it sure about is what I should go with on video cards. Is one 7970 or 580 going to be all that I need or should I go with two.

If its not going to matter much then I would rather spend the money on a new monitor and a couple of other accessories.


a single 580 will max out pretty much any single monitor you can imagine.

if you're going to have 2-3 displays, you may *eventually* want a second one.
January 10, 2012 3:35:41 AM

sgtpepperlhc said:
I have once built a pc but that was around five years ago and now I am looking to either build another one or purchase a built one from cyberpc or something. I don't think I would have any problems building one but it has been a long time since I have kept up with any type of new technology so I have some questions if I can get any advice.

1. SSD and HDD, I don't fully understand what a SSD does but from what I can tell it is used as a separate drive to store large commanly used files to be able to load faster than normal. And if so how much performance does this add, and any recommendations because all the different options boggle my mind.

2. Video cards, should I be looking at going with two mid range cards or should I go with one high range like 580 or the 6970? Or is it reasonable or even usefull to go with two high range cards like two 6970's?

3. Mobo, in this case I don't know much of anything except make sure it is compatible with the rest of the items. But one question i have is to wether i should make sure it is compatible to upgrade to the new ivey processor? Is it going to be a big enough change later to upgrade to?

4. CPU, here I am thinking about going with this Intel® Core™ i7-980 3.33 GHz Six Cores 12M Intel Smart Cache LGA1366. Just read good reviews and It seems to be correct, but is there anything overly important that I may be overlooking in this case.

5. Power supply, I plan on going with a 1000w because the reason my last build had problems in the end was from the power supply, but this maybe excessive if I don't go with two video cards correct?

6. Case and cooling, here is something I know very little about other than make sure it is big enough and cool enough. Is it hard to install liquid cooling, and is it worth it? Any recommendations on brands of cases?

7. Would it be easier and smarter for me to just purchase one froze somewhere that builds them and go with their warranty and guarantee for the extra money? I would like to build one and don't think it would be to difficult since I did it once before, but I am just wondering if spending this much money if it would enter worth just purchasing one with a full warranty.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

can you fill out this?- http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/261222-31-build-advic...
it is a little easier knowing your resolution.
!