Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Is everything compatible?

Tags:
Last response: in Systems
Share
January 12, 2012 3:46:06 PM

Hey guys, i recently decided to try and build my own gaming computer, i've picked out a few parts and was wondering if everything is compatible and if everything would fit. I just wanna be positive before i purchase anything. Thanks!

My build
https://www.aria.co.uk/WishList/ffyb1pz_5NMx95rbxDox2g,,

Please tell me if something isn't compatible or won't fit in the case.
This is my first build so i'm a little nervous. :D 



More about : compatible

January 12, 2012 4:49:56 PM

It's all compatible. I would suggest switching your RAM with one of the 8GB kits from G.Skill, Corsair, or Mushkin. It is my understanding that Excelleram isn't the best brand.
https://www.aria.co.uk/Products/Components/Memory/DDR3/...
https://www.aria.co.uk/Products/Components/Memory/DDR3/...
https://www.aria.co.uk/Products/Components/Memory/DDR3/...

Otherwise it looks good. There's some debate about the 448-core 560ti's. They're fine cards but I'm not sure they give enough extra performance to be worth the price difference over the standard 560ti's.
January 12, 2012 5:13:17 PM

I'll go with the ripjaws rather than the excelleram then. Thanks!
And yeah, i know that the 448 core is more expensive, but hey, why not :p 
I've also heard they can be as good as the 570 when overclocked.

By the way, does it matter what optical drive i get? i don't want to get one that won't fit, so do they have to be a certain size?
Related resources
January 12, 2012 10:46:21 PM

Every DVD drive I've ever seen is made for a 5.25" drive bay like the one you linked. Every once in a while you'll find a slim drive which is for HTPC cases and you don't want that, but basically any old drive will fit.

The motherboard and PSU have standard form factors. PSU's have several form factors but the most common one is ATX. The most common motherboard form factor in a standard tower is also called ATX. Smaller cases use micro-ATX or mini-ITX motherboards and there are bigger sizes, too. Your case fits an ATX PSU and motherboard which complies with the PSU and motherboard you chose. The most common problem where something doesn't fit is when the graphics card is too long for the case. However your HAF 912 has a removable HDD cage so if you use an unusually long card (especially with back-mount power connectors) you can remove that cage and have plenty of room. The last part I can think of that sometimes doesn't fit is an aftermarket CPU cooler which you don't have.
January 12, 2012 11:03:43 PM

Hey, thanks for the detailed reply, cleared up a lot for me.
I'm going to order the parts tomorrow, thanks again for your help and advice!

Is there a good video tutorial on building your first computer? i'm going to have my brother there to make sure i don't do anything stupid, but it'd be nice to have something to go off.
January 12, 2012 11:49:44 PM

I don't have a good video tutorial bookmarked (although I'm sure they exist) but the following sticky is a pretty good guide:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/274745-31-step-step-g...

It really is pretty easy. The only part that is marginally difficult is installing the CPU cooler because of the thermal paste but even that is pretty simple. If you apply "aftermarket" paste I recommend the "grain of rice" method. If you read a tutorial that tells you to use a credit card to spread the paste around, don't do that - you're just going to make a mess. Other tips that come to mind...
*use a static strap. static electricity is a pretty embarrassing way for your components to go down
*put the PSU in the case and put the RAM, CPU, and CPU cooler on the motherboard before you put the motherboard in the case.
*don't over-tighten your screws - especially on the motherboard and the cpu cooler. You need them to hold but you do not need to crank them down as tight as possible.
*double and triple check that power cables go where they're supposed to go. The motherboard needs two power connectors, the video card needs two power connectors, and the hard drive and optical drive use one power connector.
*the motherboard and graphics card will come with driver disks but there are drivers that you can download from the manufacturers' websites and they're always better.
*spend some time on your cable management. it's worth it.

Most of building a computer is putting plugs in the right holes and figuring out which screws are which. The manuals will tell you where everything goes. Feel free to pm me or post in this thread or make a new thread if you need any help.
January 12, 2012 11:57:24 PM

Got it, thanks so much for your help and advice!

!