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775 socket.... Yeah or nah?

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April 26, 2012 10:45:50 PM

Hi all. This forum was extremely helpful when I did my build some 4+ years ago. I used a gigabyte board that was highly recommended here that has the 775 socket. I think I am running the e2200 allendale if memory serves (no punn intended). Needless to say the old gal is showing her age, especially as I have recently tried to install Boxee on it to sister up with my Boxee box in the theater.....Ina any event, my system needs a jolt to keep up. Primary use is really just Internet. It will now hopefully serve as a media server too. I would really prefer to not spend more than a couple hundred bucks if at all possible. BTW, I am running 8 gig of RAM. So the questions are:

Is it worth upgrading the processor on my current board or is it a lost cause and will I only see a material benefit from a board and processor swap?

If I can keep my current board and upgrade the processor (fingers crossed) what is the way to go?

As always. Thanks in advance!

-Clayton

More about : 775 socket yeah nah

a c 78 à CPUs
April 26, 2012 10:54:04 PM

Basically any of the core 2 quads will give your system a wake up call. I'm not 100% sure if your board supports them though because I dont know what board u have lol.
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April 26, 2012 10:57:10 PM

Just remembered. GA P35 DS3L
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a c 478 à CPUs
April 26, 2012 10:58:10 PM

Assuming your current motherboard will accept a Q9400 (you need to check w/ the manufacture), it should give you a decent performance increase since it is a little faster (2.66GHz) and has 4 cores. You can purchase a refurbished Q9400 for $148.

http://www.compuvest.com/Desc.jsp?iid=1753120

If you want a new Q9400, then that brings the price up to $183, but is an OEM version. Meaning only 3 month warranty and no heatsink.

http://www.digiconcepts.com/intel_cpus_257.htm

If you want a new retail Q9400 that comes in a box with the heatsink and a full 3 year warranty, then that will set you back $340. At this point you might as well buy a current Intel Core i5 CPU, motherboard and 4 GB of RAM for more or less the same amount of money, but you will get a huge boost in performance. More than a Q9400 can give you.

http://www.amazon.com/Intel-Q9400-Processor-LGA775-BX80...
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April 26, 2012 11:02:46 PM

I have The aftermarket heat sink I bought when I built her which I assume should do the trick. When I built it I used an oem processor anyways so I am not averse to going that route, unless someone advises different.

Thanks!
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a c 78 à CPUs
April 26, 2012 11:06:54 PM

Yes your mobo supports all of the Core2 line-up so I would advise you just go ahead with the less expensive CPU upgrade to a Core 2 quad of your choosing since it does not appear this machine needs to be anything super special. A C2Q will be more than enough for any task you have listed.
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April 26, 2012 11:08:28 PM

Thanks All. Truly appreciated!

-Clayton.
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a c 478 à CPUs
April 26, 2012 11:09:28 PM

If you want to wait for next year I can sell you my Q9450 for a good price. I'm waiting for Intel's Haswell CPU. I'll throw in my Tuniq Tower heatsink for free (it's probably going to be too large for your case though).

:) 
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April 26, 2012 11:16:08 PM

Appreciate the look. But a year is a tad on the long side ;) 
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April 26, 2012 11:18:23 PM

I plunked a QX9650 in my old 775 motherboard and it flies. Now I can wait a little longer before I get a sandy or ivy...
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a c 478 à CPUs
April 26, 2012 11:23:57 PM

Cabt said:
Appreciate the look. But a year is a tad on the long side ;) 


No big deal. The only difference between the Q9400 and Q9450 is the amount of cache which does not have a huge impact on performance.
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a c 478 à CPUs
April 26, 2012 11:32:33 PM

Q9450 for $91 + $10 shipping. Used and no returns. 3 more days left in the auction so price will likely go up in the last hour or two.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Intel-Core-2-Quad-Q9450-2-66GHz...

How about a Dell PC with a Q9450 for $104? 4 day left on auction.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Dell-Inspiron-518-Desktop-Compu...

If you want to know how it feels like to be raped (well... at least your wallet), you can buy an OEM Q9450 for $399.99.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Intel-Core-2-Quad-Q9450-SLAWR-2...
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April 27, 2012 12:10:42 PM

$399.....That's just nuts. A little less inclined to buy a used CPU. I may be incorrect, but I would assume that some of these chips could have been pushed to their limits if used? Additional $80 for new doesn't seem like a bad investment...or am I just out of the know?

-Clayton
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a c 78 à CPUs
April 27, 2012 7:54:38 PM

Cabt said:
$399.....That's just nuts. A little less inclined to buy a used CPU. I may be incorrect, but I would assume that some of these chips could have been pushed to their limits if used? Additional $80 for new doesn't seem like a bad investment...or am I just out of the know?

-Clayton


If you are considering buying a new CPU for $190 you might aswell just build a new rig. Dropping $100 into a 775 socket is one thing, dropping $200 is a whole different story.
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a c 148 à CPUs
April 27, 2012 8:30:38 PM

1: you cant overclock dell or hp, well not easily. LoL So risk of a burnt cpu is small.

2: I agree with CMI86, I wouldnt spend too much on the system. Socket 775 is pretty dead. If your going to spend $200+ you might as well get a cheap i3 system and get the same perfomance as the core2quad plus now you have an easy upgrade path in socket 1155.

3: your media server will benefit from having a fast dedicated drive for the media. Having your system files, swap files, temp files, and media files all on the same drive can lead to lots of HDD thrashing. Your core2duo should be fine in media server roll.

4: Your core2duo should handle internet ok, Have you tried wiping everything and reinstalling windows fresh so that its not clutter with remants of old stuff? I would think that it would handle internet and media server just fine, my athlon x2 240 does and you have a bit more powerfull processor than I do.
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a c 478 à CPUs
April 27, 2012 8:46:29 PM

popatim said:
1: you cant overclock dell or hp, well not easily. LoL So risk of a burnt cpu is small.



Yep.

If you can get the Dell PC for a decent bid, then you can just take the Q9450 out of it and install it in your mobo. You can scavenge the rest of the Dell for any usable parts that can be reused or auctioned off. However, don't bid more than what you want to spend on the CPU because the rest of the Dell is more or less scrap.

EDIT:

The Dell is now $132.50 and it's reserve has not been met. I would consider a max bid in the range of $150 - $180 because that's basically the price of a Q9400 that has been refurbished (30 day warranty) and a new OEM Q9400 (90 day warranty).
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April 27, 2012 9:26:37 PM

The confusion ensues. Ok....so I should be fine with a used cpu...correct (I tend to look at these things as I do sports cars...sure I would love a used M3...but the guy who had it before me probably red lined the hell out of it)? But if i wanted to build a new rig....I assume I can use most of the guts of what I currently have or no? Assuming I can...RAM, SATA drives etc, what would the cost of a new board and chip be?

If I can get away with a used chip for a while, maybe that is the way to go...I tend to to doubt I can find a new board and chip for less than two bills that is worth its weight.
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a c 78 à CPUs
April 27, 2012 10:15:59 PM

Cabt said:
The confusion ensues. Ok....so I should be fine with a used cpu...correct (I tend to look at these things as I do sports cars...sure I would love a used M3...but the guy who had it before me probably red lined the hell out of it)? But if i wanted to build a new rig....I assume I can use most of the guts of what I currently have or no? Assuming I can...RAM, SATA drives etc, what would the cost of a new board and chip be?

If I can get away with a used chip for a while, maybe that is the way to go...I tend to to doubt I can find a new board and chip for less than two bills that is worth its weight.


Yes but when you go to look at that M3 you can still tell if shes in good running order. Even the "used" CPU's offer a 7-14 day warranty allowing you to verify the CPU is in good working order.

On the other note yes your SATA devices will be compatible as current MOBO's still use SATA. RAM maybe if it is DDR3 and GPU yes if it is PCI-e.
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April 27, 2012 11:13:48 PM

RAM is DDR2.....sticking with a 775 socket is sounding better...ok...so....lets assume I grab a used chip.....how do you test it to see if it is in good working order? Again with the car analogy...the timing belt may have needed to be changed at 60k but it wasnt done and now the odo reads 95k.....the car will run fine but that thing can snap loose at any moment....is there a way to actually test a cpu to know that it hasn't been beated like a rented mule?
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a c 78 à CPUs
April 27, 2012 11:37:58 PM

Cabt said:
RAM is DDR2.....sticking with a 775 socket is sounding better...ok...so....lets assume I grab a used chip.....how do you test it to see if it is in good working order? Again with the car analogy...the timing belt may have needed to be changed at 60k but it wasnt done and now the odo reads 95k.....the car will run fine but that thing can snap loose at any moment....is there a way to actually test a cpu to know that it hasn't been beated like a rented mule?


Stress test the CPU with either Prime95 or OCCT. If the system becomes unstable (lock ups, BSOD's , artifacts, anything out of the ordinary really) Or if the CPU displays abnormally high temperatures return it asap. It's a little better than the car analogy because in this scenario you get to wring that M3's neck for a week to see if you can break it, and if you do... Oh well give it back to the guys and ask to test drive another one :) 
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a c 148 à CPUs
April 27, 2012 11:54:49 PM

Cheap 1155 motherbd - $50
8gb DDR3 ram - $38
I3-2120 - $114
-----------------------
$202

see what we're getting at?
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April 28, 2012 1:35:35 AM

Do yourself the favor get an i5 2500K which is unlocked for around $220-240 you have 4 cores and can overclock to 4.6ghz on air no problem. I was on the same fence as you chasing the 775 Cpu down but gave up when looking at the cpu specs & ram DDR3 1866 16gigs for $90 try that with a 775; just saying but if you get into the new i3, i5, or i7 at least go with an i5. IMHO Best of luck to you.
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a c 78 à CPUs
April 28, 2012 1:38:22 AM

specopspc said:
Do yourself the favor get an i5 2500K which is unlocked for around $220-240 you have 4 cores and can overclock to 4.6ghz on air no problem. I was on the same fence as you chasing the 775 Cpu down but gave up when looking at the cpu specs & ram DDR3 1866 16gigs for $90 try that with a 775; just saying but if you get into the new i3, i5, or i7 at least go with an i5. IMHO Best of luck to you.


Did you even read the OP ?? This is not a gaming or high performance rig in any way. Its a light general use machine with a somewhat low budget. Besides the obvious that the 2500K is total overkill in this scenario it is also more expensive in it's self than any solution that has been discussed.
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April 28, 2012 4:57:52 AM

Go with popatim. I3 2100 was 109 at NE. Under $200
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a c 78 à CPUs
April 28, 2012 7:26:21 AM

MegaMan1 said:
Go with popatim. I3 2100 was 109 at NE. Under $200
Even though the 2100 series are a great dual core, going from one dual core to another is more of a side grade than anything else. The market is moving away from dual cores. Migh as well just buy a solid quad and sit with it instead of wasting the $$ on the i3 and having to upgrade later, just my opinion.
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April 29, 2012 6:56:36 AM

dual core VS dual core H/T.......... Plus free 1155, DDR3, 400 day upgrade path, power PFC, GB lan (maybe @ 50), better audio, and warranty.
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April 29, 2012 3:13:04 PM

I have no idea what that just meant. Please explain.
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April 30, 2012 2:52:17 AM

Dual core VS 2 Core with hyperthreading. Two real cores and two virtual cores. 775 is dead but 1155 has at least another year of life with more as it fades to next gen. DDR3 is faster, dual channel and cheaper than DDR2. Power factor correction makes volts and amp sync in psu to make them more efficient like 80+ efficiency and up to low 90% with more expensive psu. More power to computer and less to heat. Audio on Motherboard. Gigabit Lan on Motherboard except some $50 boards on have 100 mb lan. Brand new with warranty not whipped by some other dude you don't know. Maybe an expert can help here, I am just a youngster, but I think the 1155 MB is all around better than the 775. For a few bucks more move up to USB 3.0, Sata III, on board fan controll, and lots of stuff.

Clayton: I got to 1156 and then 1155 by starting where you are. My Asus MB quit after is burned up my 1394 Sony video recorder, so I started looking at a new or used replacement. The new stuff is way ahead and in demand so priced competitively.
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a c 78 à CPUs
April 30, 2012 4:20:39 AM

IMHO a C2Q is pretty much comparable to my Phenom II. My phenom II sill does everything I ask, and I ask A LOT more than you are asking your machine. I am not disagreeing with megaman that an 1155 build would be great but in all reality the i3 even with it's hyperthreading (50% of a real core at best) will fall behind a solid C2Q when it comes to multi tasking (media serving and other tasks as you have stated) If cost effectiveness is the main priority then just drop a C2Q in it an be happy that it will do what you want. If you have the $$ and care to upgrade in the future than go ahead and build a new 1155 set up (new mobo, ram and cpu)
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May 9, 2012 9:28:58 PM

Thanks everybody. Appreciate all the feedback.
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a c 135 à CPUs
May 9, 2012 10:08:32 PM

MegaMan1 said:
Power factor correction makes volts and amp sync in psu to make them more efficient like 80+ efficiency and up to low 90% with more expensive psu.

What does PFC have to do with a CPU or platform upgrade? PFC and 80+ certification are only applicable to the computer's bulk PSU, they have nothing to do with the CPU, motherboard or any other device.

Aside from that, for a very light use PC like the OP's, sprucing up the CPU if he can find something that is a major step up for under $150 is the cheapest way to go. If he can't, a platform upgrade for ~$250 might then make more sense.

An upgrade is an upgrade only if you actually need enough of the new stuff to justify the expense. All the OP wants is a little bit more processing power to be able to stream video over Boxee, any expense beyond that is wasted. The OP already has everything he needs for that in his existing system except the processing power which he is only slightly short of... he would likely be fine with a C2D-E8400 or possibly less.
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May 10, 2012 4:02:51 AM

The mother board tells the PSU how to correct the power factor. I don't think 775 mb had that feature. You can put an 80+ PSU in the 775 and it will run just like any other PSU to my knowledge (which I may be overstating here). What is DIGI + on new Asus board?
Aside from that, 150 for a dead end or under 200 for new life and performane which has upgrade paths.

I just looked at Asus site. They have P5 boards with dual channel DDR3 and other features, but here we are talking about an existing 775 board and new CPU.
If Tom's will bench test the two, I put my money on the 2100/1155 setup.
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a c 135 à CPUs
May 10, 2012 4:09:28 AM

MegaMan1 said:
The mother board tells the PSU how to correct the power factor.

Not at all.

PSUs with active PFC have a boost-converter chip between the line rectifier and primary-side capacitor(s) that phase-locks with the line voltage and modulates the current to look more like a purely resistive load to the utility network. The ATX connectors provide absolutely no means for the computer to control anything beyond on/off, the CPU/motherboard is not involved in any way, shape or form with PFC.
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May 10, 2012 4:13:52 AM

Then what is DIGI+ and surge protection on MB?
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a c 283 à CPUs
May 10, 2012 4:15:52 AM

MegaMan1 said:
Then what is DIGI+ and surge protection on MB?


Digi+ is just the VRM tech that Asus uses.
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May 10, 2012 4:20:34 AM

DJDeCiBeL said:
Digi+ is just the VRM tech that Asus uses.


and 16 phase means they can step the cpu voltage to 16 different level?
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a c 283 à CPUs
May 10, 2012 4:26:14 AM

MegaMan1 said:
and 16 phase means they can step the cpu voltage to 16 different level?


I don't know the exact specifics of how it works, but my understanding has always been that more phases allows for more stable power delivery, hence why having more phases is better for high OC's.
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May 10, 2012 4:30:55 AM

DJDeCiBeL said:
I don't know the exact specifics of how it works, but my understanding has always been that more phases allows for more stable power delivery, hence why having more phases is better for high OC's.


That jives with online search info.
Thank you and Thanks Invalid error.

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a c 135 à CPUs
May 10, 2012 4:48:48 AM

MegaMan1 said:
and 16 phase means they can step the cpu voltage to 16 different level?

No, it only means that the PWM regulator is splitting the load across 16 output channels, mainly to limit the power dissipation of each MOSFET and increase the effective switching frequency without increasing the turn-on/turn-off losses which enables them to use smaller and cheaper filtering components.

While all this can improve efficiency, stability, reliability and overclockability, it also enables manufacturers to use cheaper and smaller MOSFETs with smaller, simpler (if any) heatsinks and lower assembly costs.

So, the performance of multi-phase VRM is simply the silver lining of what otherwise is just as much a cost-cutting measure - this simply is the cheapest mean of meeting today's CPUs' power requirements.
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