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Pixels to Inches Conversion

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Anonymous
May 12, 2005 12:58:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hello, thank for your help.

Working n InfanView, if I want to crop or resize a photo to 6x4 or
another size. How many pixels are there in one inch.

In InfanView, the Resize/Resample Image Window, gives me a choice to
Set new size in Pixels and Inches, but after resizing to inches and
going back to check or viewing on the computer screen, I'm am not
getting exactly 6x4.

Can you all explain this to me?

Regards,
Jon
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 1:21:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Maybe to quick to post, I think I figured it out, when I check the
printing size, the photos checks out, 6x4, but this only creates more
questions.

If the photos I'm receiving are masters from the digital camera, (2272
x 1704) why, after I resize these photos using Preserve Aspect Ratio,
with the width set to 6 inches, will the height result in 4.5 inches?

If the camera's digital image is set to 6 x 4.5, when I send the
photos to the printer, they will not be able to preserve the aspect
ratio when they resize the photo to print out at 6 x 4. Is this
correct?

The masters are 2272 x 1704, is there a way to calculate the file MB
from the pixel size?

FYI
I'm getting baby photos from a new mom, cropping some or just sending
the photos to Wal-Mart, so family without email can pick up the photos
in their home states.

Jon
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 1:41:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I'm challanged with this photos.

2272x1704, print size 31.6 x 23.7inches

I'm trying to crop the head from the baby and can't get a 6x4 here I
thought, if I reduced the size, I could grab a 4x6 arounod the head
area, but nothing is working.

Any suggestions?

Jon
Related resources
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 1:42:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I'm challanged with this photos.

2272x1704, print size 31.6 x 23.7inches

I'm trying to crop the head from the baby and can't get a 6x4 here I
thought, if I reduced the size, I could grab a 4x6 arounod the head
area, but nothing is working.

Any suggestions?

Jon
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 1:45:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

scubatv wrote:
>
> Maybe to quick to post, I think I figured it out, when I check the
> printing size, the photos checks out, 6x4, but this only creates more
> questions.
>
> If the photos I'm receiving are masters from the digital camera, (2272
> x 1704) why, after I resize

I hope you are not resizing originals. its not needed.
you do not need to resize copies unless you are limiting the size that
they can be displayed on a monitor.

the most you need to do is to crop them to the shape you want,
like 4x6, or 8x10, or 5x7.
Not resize, but crop.
that way you maintain most of the pixels you captured.


> FYI
> I'm getting baby photos from a new mom, cropping some or just sending
> the photos to Wal-Mart, so family without email can pick up the photos
> in their home states.

look at cafepress, or exposuremanager.

>
> Jon
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 1:47:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Sorry for clogging up the board, I figured it out.
Set the picture as a percentage of the original.
J
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 2:06:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Right... I'm a bit up to speed here.

But, I do have to - Set the Size As A Percentage Of The Original - in
order to crop a 6x4 out of the photo. Otherwise, a 4x6 will only be one
eye and a nose.

Now, I don't know why, after reducing the size as a percentage of the
original, the file size is BIGGER.

The Walmat thing, seems to work out well. The photos are digital, so
somehow the files have to get printed for the people without computers.
For 19 cents I can upload the files and send a print to the states I
need to, the people can pick the prints up in one hour.

Thank for all your quick help.
Jon
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 3:18:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

scubatv wrote:
> Hello, thank for your help.
>
> Working n InfanView, if I want to crop or resize a photo to 6x4 or
> another size. How many pixels are there in one inch.
>
> In InfanView, the Resize/Resample Image Window, gives me a choice to
> Set new size in Pixels and Inches, but after resizing to inches and
> going back to check or viewing on the computer screen, I'm am not
> getting exactly 6x4.
>
> Can you all explain this to me?
>
> Regards,
> Jon
>
What about the size when you PRINT it?

There is a difference between Apple systems and PC systems as far as a
relationship between size on monitor versus the size that is associated
with the file. In general, the size written on the file in most formats
is true only for PRINTED size.

In PC/Windows systems, the basic computer system does not necessarily
KNOW what size the monitor is. Thus, the same file will produce a
different sized image on a 19 inch monitor than on a 12 inch monitor,
for example.
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 4:29:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Owamanga,

You're correct, thank you for spending the extra time.

I'm doing this as much for me as for them. We just bought a 350D and
will have to understand the results of cropping for artistic effect and
how that will apply to printing photos at home and at a shop.

Before, the photos I'd crop for artistic effect were only sent email,
so the shape did not matter. But, I believe... when printing to a fixed
format, 4x6, 5x7 or 8x10, at home or at a shop, the shape of the
cropped image matters, especially if you want the print to be exactly
as you have designed.

Sure hope the above is correct.
Ops.. I guess at home you can print out any shape you'd like.


But, what about this.

When cropping for artistic effect and printing out in a 6x4 format, I
used a 600x400 pixels size cut.

I also reset the size of the photos as a smaller percentage of the
whole. Why, 'cause when I used 600x400 pixels cut outs, the area
covered was too small to include the sections of the photos I wanted
to.. well.. include.

When I printed it out at 4x6 inches, the photo printed out at 4x6
inches as you said it would. The program was set to 6x4 inches and
that's what you got. BUT.... when I moved that file into Word, the
actual size of the cut out, the crop... in inches was only 2x3 inches.

So.. I started using 1150x750 pixels cut outs and when I moved these
files into Word, the size was 6x4 inches.

And for some photo files, using the new 1150x750 pixel cut out size, I
found that there was no need to reduce the size of the photos as a
percentage of the whole.

During these test, after I discovered that the 600x400 pixels cut outs
were too small to create a NATURAL PHOTO SIZE of 6x4 inches, I also
discovered, that printing out a 5x7 inch photo from 2272x1704 file
would require some enlarging of the photo, which made sense.

I understand the fact that Walmart will make it fit.. bigger.. smaller,
cut.... but, I just wanted to crop, for artistic sake and have a 4x6
inch photo print out. A natural photos the 4x6 size.

Now, after all the above, are you trying to teach me that the pixel
dimensions do not have a corresponding size in inches? I think you are
saying the pixels can be manipulated, but, is there a natural
corresponding size?

Why, if I set Irfan View to make an image size 6x4 inches and I bring
that image into Word, the image is not 6x4 inches, but if I set
IrfanView to 1150x750 pixels, in Word, I can get a 6x4 inch image on
the page?

This all relates to artistic cropping. I understand if you are making
the raw image file to fit a fixed format, you just print it out to that
size.


Thanks so much,
Jon
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 4:37:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I have to add.. Artistic Cropping.. ... the way I'm using it.. is ..
Cutting a face out of a group... a hand out of a arm.. a leaf from a
tree..

Not deciding for Walmart what part of the edges of a photo I will lose.

j
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 4:43:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

When you wrote this...

...... Also, it's important that you realize: Regardless of the shape or

pixel dimension image you send to wallmart, if you ask 'em for a 4x6,
a 4x6 is what they'll print - it has *absolutely* nothing to do with
any dimensions of the image file at all.......

Well... iIf I sent 'em a perfect square, 1000x1000 pixels, how would
they "fix" that into a 6x4 print without distortion? Using the movie
analogy, I would have to lose a good amount of the photo image, like a
pan and scan, without the pan.
Jon
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 8:24:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

scubatv wrote:

> Hello, thank for your help.
>
> Working n InfanView, if I want to crop or resize a photo to 6x4 or
> another size. How many pixels are there in one inch.
>
> In InfanView, the Resize/Resample Image Window, gives me a choice to
> Set new size in Pixels and Inches, but after resizing to inches and
> going back to check or viewing on the computer screen, I'm am not
> getting exactly 6x4.
>
> Can you all explain this to me?
>
> Regards,
> Jon

Hi Jon...

Asking how many pixels are in an inch is like asking
how many bites are in an apple. :) 

What you really want to do is first decide what kind of
print you want to make... you've picked 6 x 4 in this
case.

Notice I said 6 x 4 - I never said inches or pixels or
anything else. Just 6 x 4.

So the *ratio* is 6 x 4. Now what you want to do is
crop your photo so that the *ratio* - NOT the size -
is 6 x 4. If you're software shows pixels, then
make the ratio exactly 6 x 4; and you'll be fine.

Putting it another way... the software will tell you
how many pixels wide a picture is; and how many pixels
high. You crop either the height or width so that the
width is exactly 1.5 times the height.

Hope this helps.

Ken
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 8:33:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

scubatv wrote:


> If the camera's digital image is set to 6 x 4.5, when I send the
> photos to the printer, they will not be able to preserve the aspect
> ratio when they resize the photo to print out at 6 x 4. Is this
> correct?

Hi Jon...

They will preserve the aspect ratio; else your new baby
friend will be short and fat :) 

How they'll do it is by cropping 1/4 inch from the top, and
1/4 inch from the bottom.

This may work out nicely, but maybe not, depending on the
picture. If there's lots of sky and lots of grass it might
look fine. But if the baby fills the picture not so.
If it was my baby friend I'd prefer to see the top of the
had and give up the feet than the other way around:) 

So, you crop instead. Then you may choose whether to lose
all of that 1/2 inch from the bottom, or all from the top,
or some nice combination.

Take care.

Ken
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 8:50:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 12 May 2005 09:21:11 -0700, "scubatv" <scubatv@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Maybe to quick to post, I think I figured it out, when I check the
>printing size, the photos checks out, 6x4, but this only creates more
>questions.
>
>If the photos I'm receiving are masters from the digital camera, (2272
>x 1704) why, after I resize these photos using Preserve Aspect Ratio,
>with the width set to 6 inches, will the height result in 4.5 inches?

More or less, your masters are ratioed at 6x4.5 for some reason. Thus
preserving the ratio gives you those dimensions.

The requirement for you to 'resize' prior to printing isn't real, and
will only damage the quality of the image. Give the printers (walmart
in your case) as much of the original image data as possible. The only
real reason you have to resize the image is if you are cropping them
for artistic reasons, then just cut off the bits you don't want
printed and give them all of what's left.

>If the camera's digital image is set to 6 x 4.5, when I send the
>photos to the printer, they will not be able to preserve the aspect
>ratio when they resize the photo to print out at 6 x 4. Is this
>correct?

They damn well better preserve the aspect ratio. Who'd want photos of
squished or squashed people for example?

They'll crop a 6x4 out of whatever you give them after doing a
fixed-ratio resize (note, I repeat: don't try this yourself - they
know what they are doing and you don't) then dumping any excess on the
shortest measurement (the 4.5 becomes 4).

>The masters are 2272 x 1704, is there a way to calculate the file MB
>from the pixel size?

Not if you are going to compress the image, no. Compression settings
and the amount of data within the image have a big affect here.

Uncompressed, if you are working on an 8 bits per channel (1 byte), 3
channels per pixel image you have 1x3x2272x1704 bytes = 11.34Mb file,
but this really doesn't mean much. Once saved as a jpeg, this could be
anywhere between 300Kb to 1.5Mb depending on quality settings.

As for camera resolution, you are dealing with a 3.7Mpixel camera, but
you already knew that right?

>FYI
>I'm getting baby photos from a new mom, cropping some or just sending
>the photos to Wal-Mart, so family without email can pick up the photos
>in their home states.

Well, er... good luck. Something wrong with the US mail in those
states is there?

--
Owamanga!
http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 10:06:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>Then choose drag a box around the part of the picture you want, making
sure that
> That area is 6x4 (a bit of a problem). Crop, and then print at the
size
> you want.
>

That was the challenge all along. How to calculate the proportions that
would properly "fit" a 6x4, 5x7 or 8x10 piece of paper.

Help us out with some tips.

Jon
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 10:12:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

> Just divide the number of pixels available for each dimension by the
number of inches of >picture size you want, and if the number is less
than 200, you will not get a
>really good quality print.

Ok, so the 1200x800 number I stumbled upon works for 6x4 inches.
j
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 11:23:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

scubatv wrote:
> Hello, thank for your help.
>
> Working n InfanView, if I want to crop or resize a photo to 6x4 or
> another size. How many pixels are there in one inch.
>
> In InfanView, the Resize/Resample Image Window, gives me a choice to
> Set new size in Pixels and Inches, but after resizing to inches and
> going back to check or viewing on the computer screen, I'm am not
> getting exactly 6x4.
>
> Can you all explain this to me?
>
> Regards,
> Jon
>
The simple answer is:
As many, or as few, as you want.

If you want a specific size, just tell Irfanview and it will print that
size picture, using available pixels. YOU don't have to know, or care,
about the nitty gritty details.

A good picture can be printed with as few as 200 pixels per inch, while
excellent ones require 300 pixels/inch. Just divide the number of
pixels available for each dimension by the number of inches of picture
size you want, and if the number is less than 200, you will not get a
really good quality print.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 11:26:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

scubatv wrote:
> Maybe to quick to post, I think I figured it out, when I check the
> printing size, the photos checks out, 6x4, but this only creates more
> questions.
>
> If the photos I'm receiving are masters from the digital camera, (2272
> x 1704) why, after I resize these photos using Preserve Aspect Ratio,
> with the width set to 6 inches, will the height result in 4.5 inches?
>
> If the camera's digital image is set to 6 x 4.5, when I send the
> photos to the printer, they will not be able to preserve the aspect
> ratio when they resize the photo to print out at 6 x 4. Is this
> correct?
>
> The masters are 2272 x 1704, is there a way to calculate the file MB
> from the pixel size?
>
> FYI
> I'm getting baby photos from a new mom, cropping some or just sending
> the photos to Wal-Mart, so family without email can pick up the photos
> in their home states.
>
> Jon
>
If the aspect ratio from the camera is not 3:2, then you will have to
crop to get the printout on a 6x4 print. There is no way you can
calculate the size of a .jpg file from the resolution.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 11:31:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

scubatv wrote:
> Right... I'm a bit up to speed here.
>
> But, I do have to - Set the Size As A Percentage Of The Original - in
> order to crop a 6x4 out of the photo. Otherwise, a 4x6 will only be one
> eye and a nose.
>
> Now, I don't know why, after reducing the size as a percentage of the
> original, the file size is BIGGER.
>
> The Walmat thing, seems to work out well. The photos are digital, so
> somehow the files have to get printed for the people without computers.
> For 19 cents I can upload the files and send a print to the states I
> need to, the people can pick the prints up in one hour.
>
> Thank for all your quick help.
> Jon
>
Use the - to reduce the displayed size, don't get fancy. Then choose
drag a box around the part of the picture you want, making sure that
that area is 6x4 (a bit of a problem). Crop, and then print at the size
you want.


--
Ron Hunter rphunter@charter.net
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 11:56:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

scubatv wrote:
>
>
> Owamanga,
>
> You're correct, thank you for spending the extra time.
>
> I'm doing this as much for me as for them. We just bought a 350D and
> will have to understand the results of cropping for artistic effect and
> how that will apply to printing photos at home and at a shop.
>
> Before, the photos I'd crop for artistic effect were only sent email,
> so the shape did not matter. But, I believe... when printing to a fixed
> format, 4x6, 5x7 or 8x10, at home or at a shop, the shape of the
> cropped image matters, especially if you want the print to be exactly
> as you have designed.
>
> Sure hope the above is correct.
> Ops.. I guess at home you can print out any shape you'd like.
>
>
> But, what about this.
>
> When cropping for artistic effect and printing out in a 6x4 format, I
> used a 600x400 pixels size cut.
>
> I also reset the size of the photos as a smaller percentage of the
> whole. Why, 'cause when I used 600x400 pixels cut outs, the area
> covered was too small to include the sections of the photos I wanted
> to.. well.. include.
>
> When I printed it out at 4x6 inches, the photo printed out at 4x6
> inches as you said it would. The program was set to 6x4 inches and
> that's what you got. BUT.... when I moved that file into Word, the
> actual size of the cut out, the crop... in inches was only 2x3 inches.
>
> So.. I started using 1150x750 pixels cut outs and when I moved these
> files into Word, the size was 6x4 inches.
>
> And for some photo files, using the new 1150x750 pixel cut out size, I
> found that there was no need to reduce the size of the photos as a
> percentage of the whole.
>
> During these test, after I discovered that the 600x400 pixels cut outs
> were too small to create a NATURAL PHOTO SIZE of 6x4 inches, I also
> discovered, that printing out a 5x7 inch photo from 2272x1704 file
> would require some enlarging of the photo, which made sense.
>
> I understand the fact that Walmart will make it fit.. bigger.. smaller,
> cut.... but, I just wanted to crop, for artistic sake and have a 4x6
> inch photo print out. A natural photos the 4x6 size.
>
> Now, after all the above, are you trying to teach me that the pixel
> dimensions do not have a corresponding size in inches? I think you are
> saying the pixels can be manipulated, but, is there a natural
> corresponding size?
>
> Why, if I set Irfan View to make an image size 6x4 inches and I bring
> that image into Word, the image is not 6x4 inches, but if I set
> IrfanView to 1150x750 pixels, in Word, I can get a 6x4 inch image on
> the page?
>
> This all relates to artistic cropping. I understand if you are making
> the raw image file to fit a fixed format, you just print it out to that
> size.
>
>
> Thanks so much,
> Jon

Hi Jon...

Do yourself a favor and stop thinking about inches.
They're irrelevant, mean nothing, *except* when you
describe a piece of paper that a picture might be printed
on.

A picture HAS no size. Imagine this. You and I are
admiring this new baby, leaning over the carriage to
see it. You pick up your camera and take a picture.
Then you say this picture will be beautiful. I say
'Great, how big is it'? You have no answer for me because
a picture has no size. Right?

The *only* way to describe it is by telling how many
pixels wide and high it is, which doesn't at all relate
to "inches". (it does tell me how large it can be nicely
printed, but that's all)

And please stop resizing your photos. By resizing them
you're only degrading the quality. I suspect that
what's happening is that you're looking at them at 100%
on your monitor. Look at your menu or help, and see if
you can't find a way to shrink it to fit on the screen
for *view* only - or someone that uses Irfan please tell
him :) 

Then, when you can see all the picture, crop off the
necessary 1/2 inch, save it with a different filename,
and check that out.

Take care.

Ken
Anonymous
May 12, 2005 11:57:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

scubatv wrote:

> When you wrote this...
>
> ..... Also, it's important that you realize: Regardless of the shape or
>
> pixel dimension image you send to wallmart, if you ask 'em for a 4x6,
> a 4x6 is what they'll print - it has *absolutely* nothing to do with
> any dimensions of the image file at all.......
>
> Well... iIf I sent 'em a perfect square, 1000x1000 pixels, how would
> they "fix" that into a 6x4 print without distortion? Using the movie
> analogy, I would have to lose a good amount of the photo image, like a
> pan and scan, without the pan.
> Jon

They would give you a 1 inch border on each side.

Ken
Anonymous
May 13, 2005 12:40:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Thu, 12 May 2005 19:57:50 GMT, Ken Weitzel <kweitzel@shaw.ca>
wrote:

>scubatv wrote:
>
>> When you wrote this...
>>
>> ..... Also, it's important that you realize: Regardless of the shape or
>>
>> pixel dimension image you send to wallmart, if you ask 'em for a 4x6,
>> a 4x6 is what they'll print - it has *absolutely* nothing to do with
>> any dimensions of the image file at all.......
>>
>> Well... iIf I sent 'em a perfect square, 1000x1000 pixels, how would
>> they "fix" that into a 6x4 print without distortion? Using the movie
>> analogy, I would have to lose a good amount of the photo image, like a
>> pan and scan, without the pan.
>> Jon
>
>They would give you a 1 inch border on each side.

This answer, I don't understand.

--
Owamanga!
http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
Anonymous
May 13, 2005 12:47:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 12 May 2005 12:43:37 -0700, "scubatv" <scubatv@yahoo.com> wrote:

> When you wrote this...
>
>..... Also, it's important that you realize: Regardless of the shape or
>
>pixel dimension image you send to wallmart, if you ask 'em for a 4x6,
>a 4x6 is what they'll print - it has *absolutely* nothing to do with
>any dimensions of the image file at all.......
>
>Well... iIf I sent 'em a perfect square, 1000x1000 pixels, how would
>they "fix" that into a 6x4 print without distortion? Using the movie
>analogy, I would have to lose a good amount of the photo image, like a
>pan and scan, without the pan.

They crop it, so from the 1000x1000 pixels you sent them, only
1000x666 pixels will make it to the print. Remember, they never change
the aspect ratio - a square pixel stays square. A total 333 pixels
from the top and bottom of the print are thrown away, but the
remaining pixels were printed at 100% detail/quality.

If you'd gone and resampled it and ended up with a 500x333 pixel
image, it'd certainly fit 6x4 with out them cropping anything - but in
doing so you've drastically reduced the resolution of your image -
resulting in a poor quality print. So, refrain from
resampling/resizing - only crop small bits off the top/bottom to get
the shape right - maintaining as many pixels as you can.

Switch your reader to fixed width font if you can...

*******************
* Cropped away *
*-----------------*
| |
| Gets printed |
| |
| |
*-----------------*
* Cropped away *
*******************

(ASCII art has a way of confusing things...)

--
Owamanga!
http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
Anonymous
May 13, 2005 12:56:42 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 12 May 2005 12:29:41 -0700, "scubatv" <scubatv@yahoo.com> wrote:

>
>
>Owamanga,
>
>You're correct, thank you for spending the extra time.
>
>I'm doing this as much for me as for them. We just bought a 350D and
>will have to understand the results of cropping for artistic effect and
>how that will apply to printing photos at home and at a shop.
>
>Before, the photos I'd crop for artistic effect were only sent email,
>so the shape did not matter. But, I believe... when printing to a fixed
>format, 4x6, 5x7 or 8x10, at home or at a shop, the shape of the
>cropped image matters, especially if you want the print to be exactly
>as you have designed.

Exactly. Shape matters - but it's not always necessary for *you* to do
the cropping - just understand how they'll do the cropping and only
change the source file if that method they use is going to be wrong.
(eg, the subject isn't in the center of the image, and will be
destroyed by their cropping method)

>Sure hope the above is correct.
>Ops.. I guess at home you can print out any shape you'd like.

Yep, and you can at walmart too - if you *pad* your image with extra
white space (just like the black bars on letterbox movies) forcing the
resulting image to be the correct ratio for the printed paper - then
cut it out when you get it home. I've done this for weird projects
before (xmas cards etc).

>But, what about this.
>
>When cropping for artistic effect and printing out in a 6x4 format, I
>used a 600x400 pixels size cut.

Well, in doing so, you drastically reduced the resolution of your
image (much lower quality than the 2272 x 1704 original). In fact, to
maintain high standards of print, your 600x400 cut should be printed
no bigger than 1.5" x 1" on today's digital-wet-print printers. Any
bigger, and you loose sharpness and definition in the print.
Realistically, you could go up to about 3x2 but at 6x4 it'll start to
look very blurry compared to a 35mm photo.

>I also reset the size of the photos as a smaller percentage of the
>whole. Why, 'cause when I used 600x400 pixels cut outs, the area
>covered was too small to include the sections of the photos I wanted
>to.. well.. include.

Okay, I think I understand.. it's a confusing area. The only thing
that matters is the resulting image size when measured in pixels. Not
enough pixels = low quality image.

>When I printed it out at 4x6 inches, the photo printed out at 4x6
>inches as you said it would. The program was set to 6x4 inches and
>that's what you got. BUT.... when I moved that file into Word, the
>actual size of the cut out, the crop... in inches was only 2x3 inches.

So, grab the corners and make it bigger. Word could just as easily
drawn it as an icon or a 10ft x 10ft image - it really has nothing do
to with anything. Look, go out and buy a 21" screen, wow! everything
got bigger - but this is not at all relevant, the image is only
measured by pixels until *after* it's been printed onto a piece of
paper.

>So.. I started using 1150x750 pixels cut outs and when I moved these
>files into Word, the size was 6x4 inches.

Don't worry about what word does.

>And for some photo files, using the new 1150x750 pixel cut out size, I
>found that there was no need to reduce the size of the photos as a
>percentage of the whole.
>
>During these test, after I discovered that the 600x400 pixels cut outs
>were too small to create a NATURAL PHOTO SIZE of 6x4 inches, I also
>discovered, that printing out a 5x7 inch photo from 2272x1704 file
>would require some enlarging of the photo, which made sense.
>
>I understand the fact that Walmart will make it fit.. bigger.. smaller,
>cut.... but, I just wanted to crop, for artistic sake and have a 4x6
>inch photo print out. A natural photos the 4x6 size.
>
>Now, after all the above, are you trying to teach me that the pixel
>dimensions do not have a corresponding size in inches? I think you are
>saying the pixels can be manipulated, but, is there a natural
>corresponding size?

No.

>Why, if I set Irfan View to make an image size 6x4 inches and I bring
>that image into Word, the image is not 6x4 inches, but if I set
>IrfanView to 1150x750 pixels, in Word, I can get a 6x4 inch image on
>the page?

Dunno, ask Bill gates, but because he isn't printing them for you, it
makes no difference.

>This all relates to artistic cropping. I understand if you are making
>the raw image file to fit a fixed format, you just print it out to that
>size.

Just keep them pixels in the image where they belong...

--
Owamanga!
http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
Anonymous
May 13, 2005 1:14:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Owamanga wrote:

> On Thu, 12 May 2005 19:57:50 GMT, Ken Weitzel <kweitzel@shaw.ca>
> wrote:
>
>
>>scubatv wrote:
>>
>>
>>> When you wrote this...
>>>
>>>..... Also, it's important that you realize: Regardless of the shape or
>>>
>>>pixel dimension image you send to wallmart, if you ask 'em for a 4x6,
>>>a 4x6 is what they'll print - it has *absolutely* nothing to do with
>>>any dimensions of the image file at all.......
>>>
>>>Well... iIf I sent 'em a perfect square, 1000x1000 pixels, how would
>>>they "fix" that into a 6x4 print without distortion? Using the movie
>>>analogy, I would have to lose a good amount of the photo image, like a
>>>pan and scan, without the pan.
>>>Jon
>>
>>They would give you a 1 inch border on each side.
>
>
> This answer, I don't understand.


Hi...

Oops, on reading it I don't either :( 

Sorry about that. I have warned everyone that I'm
a stroke damaged old guy, haven't I?

Apologies to all; I'll try to be more careful.

Take care.

Ken
Anonymous
May 13, 2005 1:15:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

scubatv <scubatv@yahoo.com> wrote:
: Hello, thank for your help.

: Working n InfanView, if I want to crop or resize a photo to 6x4 or
: another size. How many pixels are there in one inch.

: In InfanView, the Resize/Resample Image Window, gives me a choice to
: Set new size in Pixels and Inches, but after resizing to inches and
: going back to check or viewing on the computer screen, I'm am not
: getting exactly 6x4.

: Can you all explain this to me?

: Regards,
: Jon

One thing that I have not seen (tho I admit to having skipped some of the
replys) is to point out that asking how many pixels you need to select to
get a 6x4 inch print is a variable answer. Each image not only has a
number of pixels in the image but also a "dots per inch" (DPI) or "pixels
per inch" (PPI) indication. Both names mean the same thing. So without
knowing what DPI your image is there is no way to give you and answer of
how many pixels there are in a 6x4 inch image. The 6" dimension of a 100
DPI image would be 600 pixels. But the same 6" dimension of a 300 DPI
image would be 1800 pixels. So without knowing what DPI your image is set
to we can't tell you a specific number of pixels to set your image size
to.

I don't use Infanview myself so I can't speak for that program, but in
Photoshop I can choose "resize image" where I can set the DPI to a set
number (I tend toward 300) and then set the image size in either pixels
or inches. To keep from cropping off any of the image I keep the
proportions constraint checked and try setting the width and if the
height is greater than the target size I change the height to the target
and let the width become less than the target. If I am trying to get a
specific print size, and wish to not have any of the image cropped this
works. It is rare that the dimensions of an image will exactly fit into a
specific print size as the proportions of the image rarely exactly match
the proportions of the desired print size.

It is a trade off. You either have to resize to an image that one
dimension is slightly less than the optimum, or you have to resize to fill
the least dimension and crop the other dimension to match the desired
print size. In the former the image will not completely fill the print
size. In the later case the print image will be correct but you will loose
anything that you have cropped off to make it fit.

One more thing that I thought of when I read your original question, at
least in PS, the image displayed on the screen is rarely shown at the same
size as print size. So an image that is sized to 6x4 may display on the
screen at 9x6 or even 3x2 (depending on magnification, screen size and
screen resolution). But when you send the image to the printer it will
print 6x4.

Randy

==========
Randy Berbaum
Champaign, IL
Anonymous
May 13, 2005 2:34:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"scubatv" <scubatv@yahoo.com> writes:
> Ron Hunter

>> Then choose drag a box around the part of the picture you want,
>> making sure that That area is 6x4 (a bit of a problem). Crop, and
>> then print at the size you want.

> That was the challenge all along. How to calculate the proportions
> that would properly "fit" a 6x4, 5x7 or 8x10 piece of paper.
>
> Help us out with some tips.

If you use Photoshop, the rectangular marquee tool let you just crop
to a certaim aspect ratio. Just select "fixed aspect ratio" from the
Style menu, and enter 6 by 4, 5 by 7, etc. - and Photoshop will do the
math for you.

If you want to do the math yourself, To calculate the pixel
proportions that "fit" a particular paper size, just multiply the
number of pixels on the longest side in pixels with the shortest side
in inches and divide with the longest side in inches to get the "new"
shortest side - (or vice versa if the computed shorter side has more
pixels than you started with).

Examples, starting with a 2592 x 1944 pixel (px) image:

To print at 6x4: 2592 x 4 / 6 = 1728. Crop to 2592 x 1728 px.
To print at 5x7: 2592 x 5 / 7 = 1851. Crop to 2592 x 1851 px.
To print at 8x10: 1944 x 10 / 8 = 2430. Crop to 2430 x 1944 px.

Hope this helps.
--
- gisle hannemyr [ gisle{at}hannemyr.no - http://folk.uio.no/gisle/ ]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Kodak DCS460, Canon Powershot G5, Olympus 2020Z
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
May 13, 2005 7:22:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 13 May 2005 10:34:40 +0200, Gisle Hannemyr <gisle+news@ifi.uio.no>
wrote:

>"scubatv" <scubatv@yahoo.com> writes:
>> Ron Hunter
>
>>> Then choose drag a box around the part of the picture you want,
>>> making sure that That area is 6x4 (a bit of a problem). Crop, and
>>> then print at the size you want.
>
>> That was the challenge all along. How to calculate the proportions
>> that would properly "fit" a 6x4, 5x7 or 8x10 piece of paper.
>>
>> Help us out with some tips.
>
>If you use Photoshop, the rectangular marquee tool let you just crop
>to a certaim aspect ratio. Just select "fixed aspect ratio" from the
>Style menu, and enter 6 by 4, 5 by 7, etc. - and Photoshop will do the
>math for you.
>
>If you want to do the math yourself, To calculate the pixel
>proportions that "fit" a particular paper size, just multiply the
>number of pixels on the longest side in pixels with the shortest side
>in inches and divide with the longest side in inches to get the "new"
>shortest side - (or vice versa if the computed shorter side has more
>pixels than you started with).
>
>Examples, starting with a 2592 x 1944 pixel (px) image:
>
>To print at 6x4: 2592 x 4 / 6 = 1728. Crop to 2592 x 1728 px.
>To print at 5x7: 2592 x 5 / 7 = 1851. Crop to 2592 x 1851 px.
>To print at 8x10: 1944 x 10 / 8 = 2430. Crop to 2430 x 1944 px.
>
>Hope this helps.

An alternative (the way I do it) within Photoshop is a bit more manual
- I use the info tool and drag a new crop box on the image - the info
tool tells me the width and height of the crop box. Watching those
numbers, I make the box 600 x 400 pixels, or 60 x 40 pixels, whatever
- it's the ratio that's important. Now, holding shift down, I drag the
corner of the box and move it to make it the right size. Holding shift
down whilst doing resising the crop box this tells Photoshop to lock
the width-height ratio.

--
Owamanga!
http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
Anonymous
May 13, 2005 7:29:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 12 May 2005 18:12:58 -0700, "scubatv" <scubatv@yahoo.com> wrote:

>> Just divide the number of pixels available for each dimension by the
>number of inches of >picture size you want, and if the number is less
>than 200, you will not get a
>>really good quality print.
>
>Ok, so the 1200x800 number I stumbled upon works for 6x4 inches.

Yes, it'll be okay. The digital wet printers at mpix.com for example
use lasers to render the image at around 400ppi, Your printer driver
can explain to the printer the image details as high as 720ppi (epson)
or 600ppi (canon), and some printers can even get that information
onto the paper without significant resolution loss.

BTW:
ppi = pixels per inch, not the same as dpi = dots per inch. A pixel on
a printer needs lots of dots to describe it's color.

--
Owamanga!
http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
March 28, 2013 9:12:11 PM

Anonymous said:
Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hello, thank for your help.

Working n InfanView, if I want to crop or resize a photo to 6x4 or
another size. How many pixels are there in one inch.

In InfanView, the Resize/Resample Image Window, gives me a choice to
Set new size in Pixels and Inches, but after resizing to inches and
going back to check or viewing on the computer screen, I'm am not
getting exactly 6x4.

Can you all explain this to me?

Regards,
Jon


There are 71.9 pixels in one inch.
March 28, 2013 9:12:12 PM

Anonymous said:
Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hello, thank for your help.

Working n InfanView, if I want to crop or resize a photo to 6x4 or
another size. How many pixels are there in one inch.

In InfanView, the Resize/Resample Image Window, gives me a choice to
Set new size in Pixels and Inches, but after resizing to inches and
going back to check or viewing on the computer screen, I'm am not
getting exactly 6x4.

Can you all explain this to me?

Regards,
Jon


There are 71.9 pixels in one inch.
March 28, 2013 9:12:12 PM

Anonymous said:
Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hello, thank for your help.

Working n InfanView, if I want to crop or resize a photo to 6x4 or
another size. How many pixels are there in one inch.

In InfanView, the Resize/Resample Image Window, gives me a choice to
Set new size in Pixels and Inches, but after resizing to inches and
going back to check or viewing on the computer screen, I'm am not
getting exactly 6x4.

Can you all explain this to me?

Regards,
Jon


There are 71.9 pixels in one inch.
March 28, 2013 9:12:12 PM

Anonymous said:
Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hello, thank for your help.

Working n InfanView, if I want to crop or resize a photo to 6x4 or
another size. How many pixels are there in one inch.

In InfanView, the Resize/Resample Image Window, gives me a choice to
Set new size in Pixels and Inches, but after resizing to inches and
going back to check or viewing on the computer screen, I'm am not
getting exactly 6x4.

Can you all explain this to me?

Regards,
Jon


There are 71.9 pixels in one inch.
!