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Graphics Card Compatibility Query

Last response: in Systems
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January 15, 2012 9:59:38 PM

Hey guys, I'm looking up upgrade my graphics card but I want to be sure that it will be compatible with my current setup and if you guys could suggest one that would work well etc. :) 

My system information is as follows

Operating System: Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit (6.1, Build 7601) Service Pack 1

Language: English (Regional Setting: English)

System Manufacturer: MICRO-STAR INTERANTIONAL CO.,LTD

System Model: MS-7376

BIOS: Default System BIOS

Processor: AMD Phenom(tm) 9950 Quad-Core Processor (4 CPUs), ~2.6GHz

Memory: 4096MB RAM

Motherboard Name: K9A2 Platinum

Processor Name: AMD Phenom x4 9950

Power Supply: 600W Big fan TRUST
+3.3V: 30A
+5V: 32A
+12V: 16A

I currently have a NVIDIA GeForce 9400 GT and was looking to upgrade to the ATI Raedeon like the 6770 HD Sapphire

I would just like you're help in wether this would be compatible, or wether there is a more suited one to my system specs.

Thanks in advance for you're help, and if there's anything else you need to know please ask. :) 

I've been told I should get a new PSU aswell, as the amps for the 12V pin are too low, but I'm trying to get a second opinion and I was wondering what would happen if I were to trial run it and what damage could possibly be caused
January 15, 2012 10:08:33 PM

I recently chose the GTX 560ti 448 core to save some money over both the GTX 570 and the Radeon 6770. Originally I was looking at Radeon 6750 (2gb) in the hopes of getting one that still allows unlocking its bios up to the specs of a 6770...another way to save some $.
a b B Homebuilt system
January 15, 2012 11:27:58 PM

As long as you have a PCIe 2.1 slot, you should be ok. As for MingWyo, I wouldn't ever go higher than a Radeon 6850 because anything higher WILL bottleneck your system. For damage: There should be no damage if you under power the gfx card, but it can potentially damage the gfx card if you over power it
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a b B Homebuilt system
a b U Graphics card
January 16, 2012 12:08:54 AM

r0aringdrag0n said:
For damage: There should be no damage if you under power the gfx card, but it can potentially damage the gfx card if you over power it


That doesn't make sense. Sorry. A power supply is rated to provide a certain current at a given voltage. What that means is that if the load resistance is too low, the internal resistance of the supply will drop more voltage than it should. Voltage drop means power dissipated means heat. Voltage drop across the internal resistance also means that you have less than 12 volts at the output pin. You can't "over power" anything. The load draws only what current its impedance dictates by Ohm's law.

Drawing more current than the supply is designed to provide is asking for trouble. Best case, the fuse blows. Worst case, the supply fails catastrophically and take the graphics card with it. It is important that your PSU have ample overhead in the wattage and current ratings.

But perhaps I misunderstood what was meant by under and over.
a b B Homebuilt system
January 16, 2012 12:13:59 AM

I pretty sure if the PSU doesn't provide enough power the graphics card won't be damaged unless the PSU blows
January 16, 2012 9:36:55 AM

Thanks for the advice! I was just trying to see wether I absolutely had to buy a new PSU, and I've decided to play it safe and get a new one anyway. Its best I buy a new good quality one than break anything permanently. Thanks!
a b B Homebuilt system
a b U Graphics card
January 16, 2012 9:52:02 AM

r0aringdrag0n said:
I pretty sure if the PSU doesn't provide enough power the graphics card won't be damaged unless the PSU blows


This is what happens though.

The PSU is working over-time trying to power something it cant. If the load is too high, for too long, it's likely to blow. This can not only cause damage to the GPU, but other components too. You should never try and run a system with an inadequate PSU.

Imagine running on a treadmill and someone suddenly shoves it on full speed. You might be able to sprint and keep up for a little while, but sooner or later your going to max yourself out and fall off.
January 16, 2012 10:13:53 AM

r0aringdrag0n said:
As long as you have a PCIe 2.1 slot, you should be ok.


Slots on my MoBo

• 2 mazarine PCI Express x16 slots (PCI Express Bus SPEC V2.0 compliant; supports CrossFire Technology)
• 2 light-blue PCI Express x16 slots with x8 operations (PCI Express Bus SPEC V2.0 compliant; supports CrossFire Technology)
• When 4 PCI Express x16 slots are all installed, the PCIE x 16 lanes will auto arrange form x16/ x0/ x16/ x0 to x8/ x8/ x8/ x8
• 1 PCI Express x1 slots
• 2 PCI slots, support 3.3V/ 5V PCI bus Interface.

This okay?
a b B Homebuilt system
a b U Graphics card
January 16, 2012 10:20:55 AM

Yes. You don't need a 2.1 slot, the card will just run at 2.0 as per the motherboard specification.

The only limiting factor you would have for upgrading your GPU is the PSU. 600w is enough for anything up to GTX 560Ti or ATI 6950. Should you wish to get a more powerful GPU than these, I would recommend grabbing a new PSU too. However since your looking at 6770, you should be good to go!


!