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Suggestion for a new gaming computer

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January 16, 2012 3:12:15 AM

Hello there!
I'm starting to think about getting a new computer, but I want something that'll last long enough, and that'll be good for gaming.
The problem is that I don't know lots of things in building computers.

So i've got some questions for you guys.

I'd like to know if it's better to buy a prebuilded computer or buy all the pieces individually and build it at home.
I don't know if it's hard to build the computer all by myself.

What are the best brands for gaming computers?

I would be willing to put 1000-1500$ MAXIMUM into that computer. Tho I wouldn't mind at all if I could pay less that 1000$.
I don't really want to get a uber computer that can run like Crysis at ultra. I mostly play World of Warcraft, League of Legends and soon Diablo III. I won't mind getting something better than what I need to run those game, so that it lasts longer.

If you got any websites that sells computers, customizable builds or individual pieces, feel free to post them.

I might have some more questions coming, it's all I can think about right now.


Thanks in advance!


(PS: I already got the mouse, keyboard, speaker, monitor, yada-yada. I'm basically only buying the computer.)
January 16, 2012 3:25:58 AM

You can build your own gaming rig with higher quality components and higher specifications at less cost than the prebuilt guys. The main thing you get is control over what goes into the machines. The prebuilt crowd either gives you low cost with questionable components, or very high cost with decent components.

Here are some guides from Tom's on building your own, and there are plenty of videos on YouTube on the subject. Getting it built is not really a problem as long as you go slow and follow the instructions. A lot of people get excited or impatient and slap the thing together, then wonder why it does not work. I started 24 years ago when things rarely worked, so I know the feeling.

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/288241-31-buyer-guide...

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=buiding+a+c...

At any rate, based on your requirements, this Tom's rig would suit your purposes nicely. http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/core-i5-overclock-p...
January 16, 2012 3:31:32 AM

I'm just getting into computer stuff, and recently I made my first build and scavanged some parts from my old computer. My build may not be the best, but it can run Crysis on ultra @ 1920x1080 (even though thats not what you want) and is now worth around $800-$900

My case is around $50

motherboard:MSI P67A-GD53
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

GPU's:2 Radeon hd 6770's
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Chip:Intel core i5 2300, although you may want to go with a 2500k
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Power Supply:Silencer mk11
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


RAM: 4gb of it, scavanged from my old comp, probly around 20-30 bucks

A regular disk drive and 1tb HDD from my old comp

You can get a CPU cooler for like 20-40 bucks


Although you may not go with this stuff, you can use this as a reference that a computer you need doesn't need to exceed $1000 at all. And to answer you're first question... I would build it at home.
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January 16, 2012 4:01:17 AM

tlmck said:
You can build your own gaming rig with higher quality components and higher specifications at less cost than the prebuilt guys. The main thing you get is control over what goes into the machines. The prebuilt crowd either gives you low cost with questionable components, or very high cost with decent components.


+1 post tlmck. Great comments.

As for myself I built my first computer with no prior experience or anyone to hold my hand. It may seem like rocket science but there is not much to it. Just put about 8 parts together and that is it. My next door neighbor built one when he was only 13.

I would just continue to make posts on the forum and learn. There are plenty of people here to help you out with tips and component selection.

Highly recommend building your own. Once you build one I think you'll never go back to buying one off the shelf.


Best solution

January 16, 2012 5:59:39 AM
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Doomer3003 said:
Hello there!
I'm starting to think about getting a new computer, but I want something that'll last long enough, and that'll be good for gaming.
The problem is that I don't know lots of things in building computers.

So i've got some questions for you guys.

I'd like to know if it's better to buy a prebuilded computer or buy all the pieces individually and build it at home.
I don't know if it's hard to build the computer all by myself.

What are the best brands for gaming computers?

I would be willing to put 1000-1500$ MAXIMUM into that computer. Tho I wouldn't mind at all if I could pay less that 1000$.
I don't really want to get a uber computer that can run like Crysis at ultra. I mostly play World of Warcraft, League of Legends and soon Diablo III. I won't mind getting something better than what I need to run those game, so that it lasts longer.

If you got any websites that sells computers, customizable builds or individual pieces, feel free to post them.

I might have some more questions coming, it's all I can think about right now.


Thanks in advance!


(PS: I already got the mouse, keyboard, speaker, monitor, yada-yada. I'm basically only buying the computer.)



Hey, I think I can help you out with what you're trying to do.

I built my first computer a few years back and didn't really know what I was doing, and I can say with all honesty that it really helps if you know what you're doing from the start.
You know how much you want to spend, which is good. You can definately get a moderate to high end gaming rig with that kind of money. I am also going to building a gaming computer within your price range soon, so I can show you the parts I'm going to get as well tell you some things to keep in mind.

The first step is finding the right online source to buy from. Personally, I've found newegg.com to be very good for organizing and purchasing the necessary parts. Tigerdirect's not a bad one either. You should start with the CPU and Motherboard first. One of the best CPU's for gaming (price wise) right now is the i5 2500K, which is selling for about $230. It's quad core and has some onboard graphics power, as well as noticeably lower power consumption (95 Watts) than many other CPU's out at this time. The next step is to make sure to pair this CPU with a motherboard that matches the socket type. This particular processor has LGA socket 1155; make sure the motherboard you purchase matches the socket, regardless of what you're buying. One of the nicest looking ones for this setup is the ASRock P67 EXTREME4 GEN3, which has many nice features and is one of the top rated boards out right now (149.99). The next part would be to find the RAM. Depending on if you're going to want to overclock or not, and how much potential you want in ablility to multitask, you have some options. The highest non-overclocked frequency that the 2500k can make use of with any RAM is 1333MHz, but if you overclocked you could make use of higher frequencies, like 1600MHz. You can get good RAM for relatively cheap, for example, G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) will milk you for only $46.99. The next thing I'd probably look into is the Had Disk Drive, or Solid State Drive, that you'll want to meet your needs for both space and performance. SSD drives are expensive, typically low memory, but are very fast and barely make a sound; Hard Disk Drives are best utilized with more space in mind, since you can get a relatively cheap drive that gives you a great deal of memory at your disposal. For Solid State, I would probably go with the SanDisk Ultra SDSSDH-120G-G25 2.5" 120GB ($134.99). For HDD, I would go with Western Digital Caviar Blue WD1600AAJS 160GB 7200 RPM 8MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5"($79.99)(it also comes with a free optical disk drive if you get it on Newegg, which would take care of that problem as well). Regardless of your choice in this field, you'll need an Operating System to make everything run. I would suggest Windows 7 (64 bit) home edition, but you might want to review the other versions to see if they have more features that you could make use of. Now it might be time to look into the Graphics Card. There are many available and many, many posibilities for setups. If you want to use one GPU (and not several in an SLI setup) I would probably go with the HIS IceQ X Turbo H695QNT2G2M Radeon HD 6950 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 from AMD's end($269.99), or the MSI N560GTX-Ti Twin Frozr II 2GD5/OC GeForce GTX 560 Ti (Fermi) 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 from NVIDIA's end ($254.99 with rebate). Once most of your base components are taken care of, you should then look at the amount of wattage each component consumes and find a power supply that probably has around 100 Watts headroom from what everything draws. For this particular setup, I would advise something around 700+ Wattage, like the OCZ ZS Series 750W 80PLUS ($99.99), or a more dependable yet more expensive CORSAIR Professional Series HX750 (CMPSU-750HX) 750W ATX12V 2.3 / EPS12V 2.91 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS SILVER Certified ($139.99). One thing to keep in mind is just make sure that the PSU has the right motherboard and GPU connectors, but they usually do and if not, they often come with adapter cables or you can just buy them for the extremely high price of $0.50, or around that at least.

After that is all taken care of, now its the fun part... cause now you decide how everything looks. Purchasing the tower for your setup is personal and I should not have a say in it, except for that it should be compatable with your motherboard (ATX in this situation) and be well rated (and be large enough for your GPU).

Any other things you might need, such as an optical drive, or the right cable for your monitor you should be able to figure out easily and wil probably only cost you an extra $30 (only if you need it though).

This build that I have shown you would probably cost you around $1,100 - $1,200 in the end, but thats just me and you should look into reviews of other products as well and compare prices until you feel comfortable with what you're buying. Knowledge will come with time and experience; but you'll most likely remember your first build forever for it will be a very special moment.

Have fun and good luck,



Cory Jamaul



January 16, 2012 3:27:23 PM

Best answer selected by Doomer3003.
January 16, 2012 3:31:31 PM

Thanks a lot for all your constructive answers, especially Cory's.
I really appreciate it. I'm not gonna build it that soon tho, I will do some researches based on what you guys posted here.

I will keep on updating the thread if I got more questions.

I will post the final build before buying everything too.
Thanks a lot guys.
!