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Help selling PC

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January 16, 2012 2:21:45 PM

4 years ago I built my current computer which consisted of an E6750 (2.66 Ghz dual-core), 2GB PC2-6400 RAM, and a Radeon 3850. I bought it to play TF2 and Modern Warfare and it worked great for 2 years for this purpose. The PC also has a great PS, DVD drive, sound card, ethernet, and all of your other standard accessories (no WiFi).

2 years ago around when BFBC came out, I really wanted to play it but my current computer would not handle it. I then decided to OC my CPU to 3.4 Ghz (stable) and purchased a Radeon 5770 and OC’d it also. Both of those allowed me to play BFBC at a solid 7.5/10 quality which has been fine for me for the last 2 years. It also has played the Portal series and SC2 brilliantly. Still just with 2GB of memory. The computer has basically been running 24/7 for 4 years with 0 issues. There is an aftermarket fan on the CPU and NB of the mobo to keep the temperatures healthy for this long.

So now I want to get into BF3 but I know that this rig just isn’t going to cut it. I’m thinking about upgrading but first want to understand my options for selling the current computer:

1. Would it be better for me to declock the CPU to stock and put in the 3850 and sell, or leave OC’d and sell with the 5770? Declocking and putting in the 3850 would ensure the 3850 gets sold, because I think it would be easier to sell the 5770 separately as there is still some demand for these cards.
2. Should I sell with my HDD (250 GB), and if I do, how do I completely erase the HDD so that no expert can hack into stuff not completely cleared in a format?
3. If I leave my HDD intact, I will not transfer my copy of Windows 7 to the new user. Do I just leave it without an OS completely when selling?
4. How much could I get for the PC in question?

Any other selling tips would be greatly appreciated. I usually keep computers so long that eventually I wind up just trashing them a decade after building them because all of the parts are completely useless at that point in time. I think my current computer still holds some value however, especially with the OC abilities and the fact that it can still play relatively recent games at a passing grade. And I really don’t have another use for it if I were to build a new desktop, so selling seems like a good option.

More about : selling

a b B Homebuilt system
January 16, 2012 3:08:23 PM

Your best bet would be to disassemble the rig and sell the parts individually on eBay or Craigslist. Selling a complete older system will not yield a lot of interest unless you plan to basically give it away.

If you want to find a home for the new rig, intact. I would install Linux on the box, all settings back to default speeds, with the older GPU and plop it on Craigslist for about $100.

Either way, you won't make a fortune on this rig (pile of parts). Good luck!
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January 16, 2012 3:22:35 PM

$100 really? I looked on CL and Ebay and it looks like some people are *asking* $350 or so for their similar rig. Now, they may not be selling them, but those are prices listed I see. Is $350 just completely unlikely?
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January 16, 2012 3:41:03 PM

300 easy with the overclock and the 5770.
needs 4GB ram.

$150 with the HD 3K and no os.
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a c 78 B Homebuilt system
January 16, 2012 3:47:24 PM

1) You might as well leave the computer with the stable OC. I don't see any good reason to reduce these settings unless you are doing something that will hinder the performance (like changing cooling systems).

Even if you switch video cards, it shouldn't affect the processor's OC.

If you want to try to sell the 5770 separately, feel free.

That being said, you may make it harder to sell the whole PC when you are trying to get rid of the $10 video card too.

I would sell it with the 5770 and take the loss on the $10 video card, personally. Tell the buyer they can have it as an added bonus for free.

2) Sell the HD. You will need a special program to completely erase the HD contents, though.

This website can link you to some tools for individual hard drive maker programs that do this thing (called data wiping).

3) You can offer to install Ubuntu Linux on it for free before you give it to someone if they want that. It is a free OS and actually pretty nice for people who don't care about gaming and take the time to get used to it. Otherwise tell them to install their own legal copy of Windows.

It depends on how fast you want to move it. Even an awesome house in an awesome neighborhood will take forever to sell if the owner sets a price that is entirely too high. On the other hand, if a price far too low is set then it will probably sell the same day.

It wouldn't be the worst thing in the world for you to set the price on the low'ish side anyway. The hardware is kinda old and all.

If it were my PC, I might try for 200 and see if there are any bites and if not move it down to 150 and if still nothing then 100.

You could also do something cool with it like donate it to a school or other non-profit group instead and just accept that you won't be getting anything for it. It would be nice for the students/charity, though.

Depends on how much $100 - $200 is worth to you.
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January 16, 2012 4:11:10 PM

thanks for the replies. i seem to be hearing anywhere from $100-$300, so it sounds like it's probably one of those "just post it on CL and see what happens" kind of things. i am looking to spend about $1,100 on the next build, so a $2-300 credit to that total would be nice.

when people sell their systems do they usually sell with the HDD? i didn't see a website for a list of HDD erasing software, but what is the most common tool people use?
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 16, 2012 5:11:46 PM

Selling a used PC puts all the risk on the buyer. You may list higher, but you likely won't sell at the higher price. That is why I originally recommended parting it out and selling the individual components.

Regardless, good luck!
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January 16, 2012 5:25:41 PM

tuffluck said:
thanks for the replies. i seem to be hearing anywhere from $100-$300, so it sounds like it's probably one of those "just post it on CL and see what happens" kind of things. i am looking to spend about $1,100 on the next build, so a $2-300 credit to that total would be nice.

when people sell their systems do they usually sell with the HDD? i didn't see a website for a list of HDD erasing software, but what is the most common tool people use?



Look up Eraser and Darik's Boot and Nuke

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DBAN
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January 19, 2012 2:49:03 PM

I did a quick ebay search and if I keep the DVD drive and the HDD this is a rough estimate of what is left and the prices they go for on ebay:

E6750 - 50
Gigabyte DS3 Mobo - 50
2GB 6400 RAM - 40
Radeon 3850 - 40
Radeon 5770 - 85
Arctic Cooler - 10
Thermaltake 500w PS - 20
Case - 40

Total - 335

Really not too bad considering I only paid about double that for everything collectively (not really sure how that math works). Anyway, do those prices seem pretty reasonable? Problem is not everything sells on ebay. Might wind up trashing the case, cooler, or PS. I suspect everything else would sell. I don't have any of the original boxes for these parts. Any suggestions on how to pack and ship?
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a b B Homebuilt system
January 19, 2012 4:01:20 PM

Keep the PSU as a spare. For shipping, use the USPS flat rate boxes (winner bidder pays for shipping). Go to Staples, etc, and get a bag of foam "peanuts". Place items in plastic/electrostatic bag, seal it, and put in box with peanuts surrounding the item.

Good luck!
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