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I7-3770 vs i7-3770K: what is the difference?

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April 30, 2012 3:14:24 AM

3770k is unlocked, 3770 is not (ie you can't overclock a 3770).

EDIT:

Also the stock speed for the 3770k out of box is 3.5 ghz vs 3.4 ghz on the 3770.

I don't know enough about Thermal Design Power... but it looks like the 3770k is designed for up to 77 watt vs 65 watt on the 3700k.
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April 30, 2012 3:16:38 AM

Best answer selected by bengarbe.
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April 30, 2012 3:16:51 AM

Yeah, I'm a moron. Sorry.
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a c 116 à CPUs
April 30, 2012 3:17:13 AM

K-suffix CPUs have unlocked RAM and CPU clock multipliers for overclocking.
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April 30, 2012 3:18:14 AM

bengarbe said:
Yeah, I'm a moron. Sorry.


Not a moron. :bounce: 

Best to ask. :) 
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May 1, 2012 12:01:05 AM

bengarbe said:
Is there a short and sweet difference between the Core i7-3770 and the 3770K. The more expensive one is the K and it has a lower operating frequency. I haven't found anyone writing anything about the 3770, just the 3770K. WHat gives?



I am actually a bit confused I under stand why the k is this but why does the chip lack other features



3770 has

intel SIPP
intel vPRO tech
intel VT-d
intel TXT

while the 3770k does not

http://www.techeye.net/reviews/here-comes-our-intel-cor...
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August 11, 2012 12:02:17 AM

MasterCATZ said:
I am actually a bit confused I under stand why the k is this but why does the chip lack other features



3770 has

intel SIPP
intel vPRO tech
intel VT-d
intel TXT

while the 3770k does not

http://www.techeye.net/reviews/here-comes-our-intel-cor...


Most of these features are of interest to corporate IT deployments except for VT-d which is useful if you plan on using the CPU to host virtual machines.

SIPP
Intel® SIPP aligns and stabilizes key Intel platform components, enabling a predictable transition from one technology generation to the next. Enhancing software stability, Intel® SIPP ensures zero changes to key platform components and drivers for at least 15 months, allowing for a three-month qualification period and a 12-month deployment cycle.

vPRO tech
PCs based on the 3rd generation Intel® Core® vPro™ processor family and workstation platforms based on the Intel® Xeon® processor E3-1200 v2 family with embedded security simplify and accelerate these four critical IT functions. Moreover, they provide an additional layer of protection when combined with security software.

intel VT-d
Previously codenamed "Vanderpool", VT-x represents Intel's technology for virtualization on the x86 platform.

The x86 architecture used in most PC systems poses particular difficulties to virtualization. Full virtualization (presenting the illusion of a complete set of standard hardware) on x86 has significant costs in hypervisor complexity and run-time performance. Starting in 2005, CPU vendors have added hardware virtualization assistance to their products, for example: Intel's Intel VT-x (codenamed Vanderpool) and AMD's AMD-V (codenamed Pacifica). These extensions address the parts of x86 that are difficult or inefficient to virtualize, providing additional support to the hypervisor. This enables simpler virtualization code and a higher performance for full virtualization.

intel TXT
PCs based on the 3rd generation Intel® Core® vPro™ processor family and workstation platforms based on the Intel® Xeon® processor E3-1200 v2 family with embedded security simplify and accelerate these four critical IT functions. Moreover, they provide an additional layer of protection when combined with security software.
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September 22, 2012 5:02:51 PM

licktheenvelope said:
3770k is unlocked, 3770 is not (ie you can't overclock a 3770).

EDIT:

Also the stock speed for the 3770k out of box is 3.5 ghz vs 3.4 ghz on the 3770.

I don't know enough about Thermal Design Power... but it looks like the 3770k is designed for up to 77 watt vs 65 watt on the 3700k.

both are 77w there is no diff when it comes to power usage
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September 22, 2012 10:04:08 PM

ok, so i am no overclocking expert, but i have being messing around a bit with my non K 3770 and i have been able to change clockspeed and CPU multiplier.

so it's NOT completely locked, but I am assuming the K version is more clockable and probably better capable of handling the extra power and heat.

just as a reference, the standard clock speed is 100MHz and the multiplier is x 34.0.

I could underclock it to 96 MHz and just x 16.0... super cold and slow
and i dared not go above 100 MHz and x 39.0... super hot(80C+) and marginally faster

some applications were up to three times faster.

IStill, I kinda regret buying the non K, the price difference with the K version is not that great, and I think that on the long run you can get a nice cooler that will let you get a nice advantage compared to the non K, and probably the best high end CPU power for your money.
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