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New build won't POST, I've tried everything. Is Mobo/CPU fried?

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January 17, 2012 2:48:23 PM

Several weeks ago I ordered a whole new set of hardware and started my new build. After putting the rig together, I tried booting, but the CPU wouldn't POST and the computer started an infinite reboot loop. I tried everything I knew to troubleshoot (the case didn't come with a system speaker, so I have no idea what (if any) the error codes are), and finally just took the whole rig apart again. After unseating the CPU (Intel i5) I noticed two of the pins on the motherboard CPU socket were bent backwards underneath all the others. I don't know how this could happen, and stupidly I didn't check the pins before I seated the CPU the first time around. After trying to get Newegg to RMA, they sent it back to me citing "customer error".

Fast forward to today. My motherboard just arrived back from Newegg and I decided that since I can't get it RMA'd I'll try to fix the pins myself. I used a needle and carefully bent the pins into the correct direction and re-seated the CPU. I took the CPU back off immediately and checked to make sure there were indentions in all the correct pads. There were. Thinking I had fixed the problem I mounted the motherboard in the case and tried to power up. Again, no POST and an infinite loop of the computer starting to power on only to immediately power off and start over.

So, what do I do now? Is there a way to tell whether it's my motherboard that's fried? Or a way to tell if it's my CPU? I'm almost positive it isn't the power supply: I tried my old one from my previous build and it exhibits the same problems.

A list of the hardware in question:
- Antec 300 ATX Mid Tower
- Cooler Master GX 750W RS750-ACAAE3-US
- Gigabyte GA-Z68M-D2H LGA 1155 Intel Z68
- Intel i5-2500K 3.3GHz
- G.Skill Ripjaws (2 x 4GB)

Any suggestions? Am I SOL? I saved for months to buy this rig and I don't think I have enough to replace both the mobo and the CPU. Thanks for the help.

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a b B Homebuilt system
a c 219 à CPUs
January 17, 2012 3:05:40 PM

I don't think that you have to replace the cpu , just the motherboard. I know you think that you have bent the pins back to the correct position but it is almost impossible to do and it does show that you didn't fix the problem because the computer is doing the same thing. If everything looks good on the cpu then you are most likely coing to have to get a new motherboard. If you still have some of the 30 days left on the cpu and it doesn't look damaged then you could RMA the cpu and then you would either get another one or they will tell you it's damaged and it's customer error and then you will know for sure.
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January 17, 2012 3:10:39 PM

inzone said:
I don't think that you have to replace the cpu , just the motherboard. I know you think that you have bent the pins back to the correct position but it is almost impossible to do and it does show that you didn't fix the problem because the computer is doing the same thing. If everything looks good on the cpu then you are most likely coing to have to get a new motherboard. If you still have some of the 30 days left on the cpu and it doesn't look damaged then you could RMA the cpu and then you would either get another one or they will tell you it's damaged and it's customer error and then you will know for sure.


Well replacing the motherboard would definitely be easier than the CPU. So you do think it is unlikely that the CPU could be harmed by a few bent pins?
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January 17, 2012 5:51:41 PM

Alright, I've ordered a new motherboard. Went with an Asus this time, just in case it wasn't my fault the pins were bent.

This thread is probably not the best place to ask, but how can I ensure that I don't bend any pins on this new motherboard when I install the CPU? I just don't know how I did anything wrong. I didn't touch the pins, I carefully placed the CPU in the socket, lowered the metal cover and then slowly lowered the swing-arm until it was locked in place. I just don't know how that could have bent two pins and left the rest alone.
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a b B Homebuilt system
a c 219 à CPUs
January 17, 2012 6:11:44 PM

It is so easy to bend those pins and I have done it also and like you I spent a good amount of time trying to meticulously bend them back with no success. You also have to be carefull removing the plastic cover that it ships with and I am sure you will be inspecting the socket before you place the cpu in it. You do have to be extremely carefull like you said in placing the cpu in the socket , I guess you just have to do the best you possibly can and make sure that you are dropping it straight down into the socket and that the side grooves are lined up before you lock it down.
Good luck and I hope you have success this time.
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January 17, 2012 6:26:16 PM

Thanks a lot! This is my first build with an Intel processor. It seems much easier to bend a pin on a motherboard than to mess something up with the old AMD sockets. Hopefully everything will go well this time around.
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January 17, 2012 6:26:30 PM

Best answer selected by WillPall.
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January 19, 2012 6:29:06 PM

Just as a follow-up for anyone having the same problem as I, my new motherboard arrived today. After installation, everything works perfectly.

Moral of the story: even if you "fix" the bent pins, it will probably still be broken.
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