Cingular bumping

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

here's a quick conversation which may be of interest. By the way,
Pauline, are you using GSM with Cingular?
Miles
------------------------------------------
Incidentally, it works fine with BT, but that is Nokia-- voice dialing
via BT is a great advent for me. A few people have told me that during
peak hours they cannot make connection -- Cingular is becoming too
popular for their current abilities. One lady told me that in talking
with Cingular in San Francisco that if someone is closer to the tower
than you, you can me thrown off, and they get on!

Miles
-----------------------------------------

I don't think so. It's pretty much whoever is using the channel first
keeps it with GSM. Your call could drop if your call tries to move to
a tower that is busy but the only way you can get bumped is with that
newly implemented law enforcement priority I believe.

It may work differently with CDMA.
-----------------------------------------

I think I have heard that CDMA suffers from the"shrinking cell effect",
which means when a tower reaches capacity, the people closest to the
tower are the ones the system keeps on. It would explain while I was in
Chicago 2 years ago why the Verizon phone I used would sometimes have
"full" signal in one place, and minutes later have no signal at all
(Verizon was terribly overloaded when I was there.)
4 answers Last reply
More about cingular bumping
  1. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

    On Sun, 03 Jul 2005 13:58:25 GMT, Miles <mileschap@REMOVEMEpacbell.net> wrote:

    >here's a quick conversation

    With whom?
    And,what are their credentials?

    >which may be of interest. By the way,
    >Pauline, are you using GSM with Cingular?
    >Miles
    >------------------------------------------
    >Incidentally, it works fine with BT, but that is Nokia-- voice dialing
    >via BT is a great advent for me. A few people have told me that during
    >peak hours they cannot make connection -- Cingular is becoming too
    >popular for their current abilities. One lady told me that in talking
    >with Cingular in San Francisco that if someone is closer to the tower
    >than you, you can me thrown off, and they get on!
    >
    >Miles
    >-----------------------------------------
    >
    >I don't think so. It's pretty much whoever is using the channel first
    >keeps it with GSM. Your call could drop if your call tries to move to
    >a tower that is busy but the only way you can get bumped is with that
    >newly implemented law enforcement priority I believe.

    Or, equivalent systems.

    >It may work differently with CDMA.
    >-----------------------------------------
    >
    >I think I have heard that CDMA suffers from the"shrinking cell effect",
    >which means when a tower reaches capacity, the people closest to the
    >tower are the ones the system keeps on. It would explain while I was in
    >Chicago 2 years ago why the Verizon phone I used would sometimes have
    >"full" signal in one place, and minutes later have no signal at all
    >(Verizon was terribly overloaded when I was there.)

    Betrays total ignorance of the foundations of CDMA technology.

    With CDMA, it's the S/N ratio, not proximity.


    --
    John Bartley K7AAY USBC/DO PDX OR USA
    "This is a carburetor," Hank tells his son. "Take it apart, put it back together; repeat until you're normal." - KOTH
  2. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

    John Bartley K7AAY telcom admin, Portland OR wrote:
    > On Sun, 03 Jul 2005 13:58:25 GMT, Miles <mileschap@REMOVEMEpacbell.net> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>here's a quick conversation
    >
    >
    > With whom?
    > And,what are their credentials?
    >
    >
    >>which may be of interest. By the way,
    >>Pauline, are you using GSM with Cingular?
    >>Miles
    >>------------------------------------------
    >>Incidentally, it works fine with BT, but that is Nokia-- voice dialing
    >>via BT is a great advent for me. A few people have told me that during
    >>peak hours they cannot make connection -- Cingular is becoming too
    >>popular for their current abilities. One lady told me that in talking
    >>with Cingular in San Francisco that if someone is closer to the tower
    >>than you, you can me thrown off, and they get on!
    >>
    >>Miles
    >>-----------------------------------------
    >>
    >>I don't think so. It's pretty much whoever is using the channel first
    >>keeps it with GSM. Your call could drop if your call tries to move to
    >>a tower that is busy but the only way you can get bumped is with that
    >>newly implemented law enforcement priority I believe.
    >
    >
    > Or, equivalent systems.
    >
    >
    >>It may work differently with CDMA.
    >>-----------------------------------------
    >>
    >>I think I have heard that CDMA suffers from the"shrinking cell effect",
    >>which means when a tower reaches capacity, the people closest to the
    >>tower are the ones the system keeps on. It would explain while I was in
    >>Chicago 2 years ago why the Verizon phone I used would sometimes have
    >>"full" signal in one place, and minutes later have no signal at all
    >>(Verizon was terribly overloaded when I was there.)
    >
    >
    > Betrays total ignorance of the foundations of CDMA technology.
    >
    > With CDMA, it's the S/N ratio, not proximity.
    >
    >
    > --
    > John Bartley K7AAY USBC/DO PDX OR USA
    > "This is a carburetor," Hank tells his son. "Take it apart, put it back together; repeat until you're normal." - KOTH

    This msg was sent in error to the newsgroup and it was cancelled, but
    evidently Mozilla that only cancels it from my view, not from the NG.
    Miles
  3. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

    On Thu, 07 Jul 2005 17:59:38 GMT, johnbartley@email.com (John Bartley
    K7AAY telcom admin, Portland OR) wrote:

    >>I think I have heard that CDMA suffers from the"shrinking cell effect",
    >>which means when a tower reaches capacity, the people closest to the
    >>tower are the ones the system keeps on. It would explain while I was in
    >>Chicago 2 years ago why the Verizon phone I used would sometimes have
    >>"full" signal in one place, and minutes later have no signal at all
    >>(Verizon was terribly overloaded when I was there.)
    >
    >Betrays total ignorance of the foundations of CDMA technology.
    >
    >With CDMA, it's the S/N ratio, not proximity.

    And since the people farthest from the tower are likely to have a
    lower S/N ratio they will probably get bumped first.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

    John Bartley K7AAY telcom admin, Portland OR wrote:

    >>-----------------------------------------
    >>
    >>I think I have heard that CDMA suffers from the"shrinking cell effect",
    >>which means when a tower reaches capacity, the people closest to the
    >>tower are the ones the system keeps on. It would explain while I was in
    >>Chicago 2 years ago why the Verizon phone I used would sometimes have
    >>"full" signal in one place, and minutes later have no signal at all
    >>(Verizon was terribly overloaded when I was there.)
    >
    >
    > Betrays total ignorance of the foundations of CDMA technology.

    Yes, you have. :)

    > With CDMA, it's the S/N ratio, not proximity.

    Actually, it's both. In CDMA, ec/Io will still increase with distance.
    That's simple RF theory; the further away you are from the RF source,
    the wekaer the received signal. In CDMA, this translates to a higher
    noise floor at the fringes of the cell site.

    Consequently, as a site's load increases, the noise floor increases for
    everyone, but moreso for those users farthest away from the cell site.
    So yes, the furthest cell users would get likely get have their calls
    drop first. And the term is cell "breathing," not cell shrinkage.
    Close enough though.


    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.
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