Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

First time building--Please help rating!!

Last response: in Systems
Share
January 17, 2012 5:37:03 PM

Hi all, been reading many threads here and finally decided to post and ask the community. I'm looking to build a computer for gaming. I was looking for i7 2600k but I'm trying to build one within budget (under $1000 CAD) so I'm looking for alternative components. Will look to Overclock.

What I have in my mind right now (Most prices are quoted from NCIX):

CPU: i5 2500k ($220) / AMD Phenom II X6 - 1100T Black Edition ($195) / AMD Phenom II X4 - 980 ($170)
GPU: Gigabyte GeForce GTX560 Ti Core 448 ($280)
Mother Board: At least 4 RAM slots. Compatible with AMD CPU chip with GeForce GPU. Need help with this one..
Power Supply: OCZ ModXStream Pro 700W ATX 20/24PIN SLI Ready Modular Cables 135mm Fan 80PLUS Power Supply ($60)
Heatsink: Corsair Cooling Hydro Series H60 High Performance CPU Cooler System ($60)
Ram: 2x Kingston HyperX 4 GB DDR3-1600 XMP Dual Channel Memory Kit ($45)
Hard Drive: Western Digital WD1502FAEX Caviar Black 1.5TB SATA3 7200RPM 64MB Cache Internal Hard Drive OEM ($150)
DVD: LG Internal 22X SUPER-MULTI Drive Black IDE Pata OEM ($19)
Case: Coolermaster HAF 912 Black Mid Tower ATX Case 4X5.25 1X3.5 6X3.5INT No PS Front USB Sound ($55)
Software: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium Edition 64BIT SP1 DVD OEM ($100)

Also, PC Assembly and Testing With 1 Year Limited System Warranty ($50)

Total: $989-$1039 not included Mother Board.

---

How is this system rated from the community?

Which CPU would be the best pick for me? (I've heard X4-980 is better for gaming as it can OC to 4.5GHz?)

Would I need a better Power Supply like Coolermaster GX 750W 80+ Power Supply SLI ATX12V V2.31 24PIN Active PFC PCI-E 120MM Fan ($90)?

Is the Heatsink H60 good enough for the system? Would I need to get H80 instead?

I heard from my friends said Asus MB are quite reliable, should I get an Asus MB?

Any difference for Kingston RAMs & G.Skill RAMs?

Since I'm on budget, should I buy all the components and have a friend assemble the computer for me? So I may save the $150 from Windows 7 & PC assembly, however, having no warranty would be an issue?

Any suggestions for parts to having bigger bang for my buck?

All comments and suggestions are greatly appreciated!! :) 

More about : time building rating

January 17, 2012 6:26:28 PM

CPU: If you want the best CPU for gaming right now, get the i5-2500k. If you prefer to spend less, then the 980 is a good choice. 6-core processors are not necessary yet for gaming.

GPU: That's a good card. If you want to bring the price down a bit, the regular 560 ti is also a great card and you probably won't notice a huge difference.

PSU: That's not a bad PSU and you would not need more than 700w unless you decide to SLI later. That said, I'd personally stick with the Antec, Corsair, or Seasonic brands myself.

Cooler: That cooler is fine. The stock cooler would probably be fine, but I've heard Intel stock coolers can be kinda lame. Usually you only need an aftermarket cooler if you plan on overclocking. So if you go AMD, stick with stock. If you go Intel, buy the aftermarket cooler.

Motherboard: Asus is a good brand. So are Gigabyte and ASRock. If you get an AMD CPU, I can recommend this:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

That's what I've got with a Phenom ii x4 955 BE. But I'd still recommend going Intel.

The RAM you selected is fine.

If you're not comfortable with no warranty, then I don't recommend building your own computer. It's hard to tell what's involved with the NCIX limited assembly warranty. I can't imagine it would be much. I personally had fun building it myself . I recommend giving it a shot, your friend can help you, and you might learn enough to make you more confident going without a warranty.
January 17, 2012 6:46:34 PM

Quote:
Since I'm on budget, should I buy all the components and have a friend assemble the computer for me? So I may save the $150 from Windows 7 & PC assembly, however, having no warranty would be an issue?


The manufacturers have their own warranties and they're usually really good about honoring them (there's a few very rare cases when that's not the case). If a part goes bad you have to contact the manufacturer of that part and they'll usually replace it for you.

Quote:
Is the Heatsink H60 good enough for the system? Would I need to get H80 instead?


I would actually advise you not to go with a closed block like the H80. You're better off going with an air cooler if you're that concerned about a warranty. I'd advise reading this about air cooling: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/cooling-airflow-hea...

Spend the difference that you'd be saving on an air cooler and put that into getting a better PSU.

Quote:
I heard from my friends said Asus MB are quite reliable, should I get an Asus MB?


Asus is among the best in the industry, as is Gigabyte, EVGA, and even Intel. Asrock is pretty decent and then there's the rest (ECS, Biostar, etc).

Quote:
Any difference for Kingston RAMs & G.Skill RAMs?


Not really - RAM pretty much all comes off the same assembly line anymore. What's important for RAM though are your speeds, timings, and voltage. You don't want to get something your motherboard can't support and you also want to make sure you'll get RAM without tall heat sinks.

Quote:
Would I need a better Power Supply like Coolermaster GX 750W 80+ Power Supply SLI ATX12V V2.31 24PIN Active PFC PCI-E 120MM Fan ($90)?


What you should look for in a power supply is the OEM's reliability (some are way better than others), and you also want to look for a UL rating and certification (80+ bronze is the standard, silver and gold are better). Sometimes it's not always a good idea to get a PSU with higher wattage than it is to get one that's far more energy efficient.

Quote:
Since I'm on budget, should I buy all the components and have a friend assemble the computer for me? So I may save the $150 from Windows 7 & PC assembly, however, having no warranty would be an issue?


You'll pretty much have to buy a Windows license no matter what - even the big box manufacturers like Dell and HP aren't including the discs with their systems anymore and you have to make your own. This takes up lots of valuable HD space as they generally split this off into another partition.

Quote:
GPU: That's a good card. If you want to bring the price down a bit, the regular 560 ti is also a great card and you probably won't notice a huge difference.


No question. But I'd really go with EVGA if you're buying an NVIDIA card as they're one of the best in the business and have an excellent RMA/support department. Alternately you could try a Radeon 6850 and you'd save quite a bit of money.

Quote:
Mother Board: At least 4 RAM slots. Compatible with AMD CPU chip with GeForce GPU. Need help with this one..


This is the board I use and I really like it so far: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Quote:
Cooler: That cooler is fine. The stock cooler would probably be fine, but I've heard Intel stock coolers can be kinda lame. Usually you only need an aftermarket cooler if you plan on overclocking. So if you go AMD, stick with stock. If you go Intel, buy the aftermarket cooler.


They are, and I'm in the minority here when I say that I don't like either Intel or AMD's stock coolers. I took the fan off an X58 board I was using and not only did it snap in half, I found it was a cheap piece of aluminum with a plastic fan on top. I've tried tons of different ones including Zalman, Xigmatek, Thermalright, EVGA, you name it. I've so far had the worst results with the Thermalright (and near-fatal with Xigmatek), I've had the best results with the Cooler Master Hyper 212. I'm hoping the EVGA fan is good, I ordered it on Saturday and it should be here today.
Related resources
January 17, 2012 7:10:06 PM

Thanks guys for the detail replies!!


Still a few questions in my mind to decide which parts I should get.

CPU: how is the CPU performance compared between i5 2500k / AMD Phenom II X4 - 980?

GPU: how is the GPU performance compared between Radeon 6850 / GeForce GTX 560t 448 core / GeForce GTX 560t fermi ?
how is the brands compared between gigabyte / EVGA / others--for video cards (GeForce or Radeon) ?

Cooling: would additional air cooler be enough for overclocking?


According the the specs listed, would this build worth the $1000?

Sorry for all the questions, I'm a noob. :pt1cable: 
January 17, 2012 10:38:05 PM

Which of the power supply are better?

SeaSonic X750 Gold 750W ATX12V V2.3/EPS 12V V2.91 SLI Ready 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

---

Antec High Current Gamer Series HCG-750 750W ATX12V v2.3 / EPS12V v2.91 SLI Certified CrossFire Certified 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


The Antec one is having a promote.. $84.99 after rebates + free shipping.. sounds like a good deal......
January 17, 2012 10:45:30 PM

Sugarism said:
Which of the power supply are better?

SeaSonic X750 Gold 750W ATX12V V2.3/EPS 12V V2.91 SLI Ready 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

---

Antec High Current Gamer Series HCG-750 750W ATX12V v2.3 / EPS12V v2.91 SLI Certified CrossFire Certified 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


The Antec one is having a promote.. $84.99 after rebates + free shipping.. sounds like a good deal......


The Antec is appealing because of the price. But Seasonic is considered the premier brand in PSUs. The other reason this Seasonic is better is that it's modular, meaning you can attach only the cables that you need. Non-modular means everything is permanently connected to the PSU. Modular is great because it allows for less clutter and confusion when connecting and managing cabling. But you have to decide if that's worth the extra money.
January 17, 2012 10:53:23 PM

Sugarism said:
Thanks guys for the detail replies!!


Still a few questions in my mind to decide which parts I should get.

CPU: how is the CPU performance compared between i5 2500k / AMD Phenom II X4 - 980?

GPU: how is the GPU performance compared between Radeon 6850 / GeForce GTX 560t 448 core / GeForce GTX 560t fermi ?
how is the brands compared between gigabyte / EVGA / others--for video cards (GeForce or Radeon) ?

Cooling: would additional air cooler be enough for overclocking?


According the the specs listed, would this build worth the $1000?

Sorry for all the questions, I'm a noob. :pt1cable: 


I'm going to turn you back to TomsHardware for your answer on these...

CPU: the i5-2500k is regarded, without reservation, the absolute best gaming CPU on the market today for the money. The AMD is a great processor, but the i5 is just faster.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-cpu-review-o...

GPU: It's hard to say that one is better than another. They're all pretty on-par with each other, with the 448 core being a smallish improvement over the standard 560 Ti. But each will perform differently on different tasks or in different games depending on your system and the drivers. For example, one might excel at anti-aliasing while the other might handle textures better. You really can't go too wrong with any of those, so the best strategy is to read reviews and go with your gut.

As for brand of GPU, I think EVGA is pretty much the one to go with across the board for nVidia chips. For AMD, I'm partial to Sapphire, ASUS, and Gigabyte. A lot of people like XFX because they have some kind of lifetime warranty, but I've heard they tend to run hot. Just read reviews on those as well, check prices, and go with your gut.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-graphics-car...

As for aftermarket CPU cooler, I would just get this and not worry about it:

http://www.buy.com/prod/cooler-master-hyper-212-evo-rr-...

It's a magnificent air cooler. Unless you're going to be doing some extreme overclocking, it will keep your CPU cool and healthy.
January 17, 2012 10:56:20 PM

Thank you for your reply & information.

1 big question, I lack most knowledge of MOBO. If I were to buy a Pentium i5-2500k CPU with a GeForce GTX 560 Ti 448 core GPU, which Asus MOBO would best suit my situation?

And as of power supply, I thought Antec, Corsair & Seasonic would all be in decent performance. But as ringzero mentioned, Seasonic does have Modular...
January 17, 2012 10:59:47 PM

ringzero said:
I'm going to turn you back to TomsHardware for your answer on these...

CPU: the i5-2500k is regarded, without reservation, the absolute best gaming CPU on the market today for the money. The AMD is a great processor, but the i5 is just faster.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-cpu-review-o...

GPU: It's hard to say that one is better than another. They're all pretty on-par with each other, with the 448 core being a smallish improvement over the standard 560 Ti. But each will perform differently on different tasks or in different games depending on your system and the drivers. For example, one might excel at anti-aliasing while the other might handle textures better. You really can't go too wrong with any of those, so the best strategy is to read reviews and go with your gut.

As for brand of GPU, I think EVGA is pretty much the one to go with across the board for nVidia chips. For AMD, I'm partial to Sapphire, ASUS, and Gigabyte. A lot of people like XFX because they have some kind of lifetime warranty, but I've heard they tend to run hot. Just read reviews on those as well, check prices, and go with your gut.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-graphics-car...

As for aftermarket CPU cooler, I would just get this and not worry about it:

http://www.buy.com/prod/cooler-master-hyper-212-evo-rr-...

It's a magnificent air cooler. Unless you're going to be doing some extreme overclocking, it will keep your CPU cool and healthy.


Thank you so much for your info ringzero!!
January 17, 2012 11:05:56 PM

Sugarism said:
Thank you for your reply & information.

1 big question, I lack most knowledge of MOBO. If I were to buy a Pentium i5-2500k CPU with a GeForce GTX 560 Ti 448 core GPU, which Asus MOBO would best suit my situation?

And as of power supply, I thought Antec, Corsair & Seasonic would all be in decent performance. But as ringzero mentioned, Seasonic does have Modular...


I'm no expert on motherboards either, but there's one major question that can help determine what board to get: do you ever plan to get another GTX 560 Ti and have two in SLI? If so, then I would recommend this:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

If not, then I would recommend this:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

There are many others, but those are two that jumped out at me.

Actually, I take that back on that last motherboard. It's micro-ATX, which isn't terrible, but I'd think you'd want to stick with a full ATX board. Are you sure you want to stick with Asus? There are other good brands.

Anyway, here's another non-SLI mobo that might work for you, that's full ATX:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
January 18, 2012 5:30:34 PM

ringzero said:
I'm no expert on motherboards either, but there's one major question that can help determine what board to get: do you ever plan to get another GTX 560 Ti and have two in SLI? If so, then I would recommend this:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

If not, then I would recommend this:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

There are many others, but those are two that jumped out at me.

Actually, I take that back on that last motherboard. It's micro-ATX, which isn't terrible, but I'd think you'd want to stick with a full ATX board. Are you sure you want to stick with Asus? There are other good brands.

Anyway, here's another non-SLI mobo that might work for you, that's full ATX:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Seems like this mobo is pretty ideal to me,
http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1681...

on the other note, should I wait for Ivy Bridge to come out? It's suppose to be released in Spring..
January 18, 2012 5:36:18 PM

Ivy bridge probably isn't going to offer a big improvement in terms of gaming performance, but if you get a GEN 3 motherboard with your new build, you'll be able to upgrade to an ivy bridge processor without buying anything else.

Edit: I actually could be wrong about the GEN 3 thing, thought I'd read something about it, can't seem to find it anywhere now.
January 18, 2012 5:39:29 PM

Ok, found what i was looking for, the Asus p8z68 Gen 3 series motherboards are Ivy Bridge compatible
January 18, 2012 5:58:08 PM

jeremyp1979 said:
Ok, found what i was looking for, the Asus p8z68 Gen 3 series motherboards are Ivy Bridge compatible



Thank you for the update mate! Will check prices accordingly!!
January 19, 2012 12:19:38 AM

Hi all, this is what I've bought so far. Please do let me know if I bought the wrong/bad/not worthy item, I can have refund within 14 days.

PSU (On sale $139.99+tax--Originally $219.99+tax):

Antec High Current Pro HCP-750 750W TX12V v2.3 / EPS12V v2.92 SLI Certified CrossFire Certified 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply
http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1681...


Case (On sale $89.99+tax--Originally $129.99+tax):

COOLER MASTER HAF 922 RC-922M-KKN1-GP Black Steel + Plastic and Mesh Bezel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1681...


--EDITED--

How is this PSU compared to Antec High Current Pro?

SeaSonic X760 (SS-760KM) 760W ATX12V V2.3/EPS 12V V2.91, 80Plus Gold Certified, Active PFC Power Supply
http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1681...

New promotion just came out & it's on sale for $119.99. I'm think I will switch to Seasonic.
!