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Actually Building the Computer: Question

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January 18, 2012 3:45:22 AM

From some people I hear that antistatic wristbands are not that great and it's better to use an anti-static mat. From others, I hear the opposite. What's the safest way for me to not screw up the parts I bought while building my computer?

So far, I have gathered:
- Not working on carpet
- Don't wear socks
- Grounding yourself (touch the case? where should the case be? on the floor? specific type of floor? tile vs hardwood?...)

Advice would be greatly appreciated right now.
January 18, 2012 3:46:46 AM

The MOBO should come with an antistatic wrapping. Place the MOBO on that, or use the cardboard box it came with. Just touch the metal part of case throughout the assembly process.
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January 18, 2012 3:52:06 AM

azeem40 said:
The MOBO should come with an antistatic wrapping. Place the MOBO on that, or use the cardboard box it came with. Just touch the metal part of case throughout the assembly process.


Both hands? How often? (Once every minute? two minutes? thirty seconds?)

*You can tell I have not a clue*

I thought only the inside of the wrapping was anti-static with the outside being "static-prone."
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January 18, 2012 3:54:34 AM

One hand on the metal, then work inside the case. Just regularly touch the metal of the case throughout the assembly process.
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January 18, 2012 3:57:11 AM

Be organized. I put mine together on a 6' folding table with a piece of rubber rolled out on it. READ the literature. The book for your motherboard WILL be helpful. especially the wiring diagrams. I put my dream machine together in about an hour and it fired up perfectly on the first shot. I credited a lot of that to the several hours I spent reading everything I could about my products. My system was a $3700 obsession of mine for about 2 months though before I actually put it together.... maybe you aren't as white/nerdy as me though :D  Good luck man. Patience & Organization.... and ya.. tile or hardwood will be fine. just keep the cat away and you'll be fine.
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January 18, 2012 4:01:04 AM

If you pay attention to the weather you will know when static electricity is at it's worst. Low humidity and dry air add to static electricity and you should take extra precautions when that is the conditions. If it is humid and not so humid then you will have a better chance of little or no static electricity. When walking into a room touch the wall switch especially near the screws and you will hear a discharge of static. Wood or tile floors are best for working on and the table or counter should be the same plus plastic or formica tops. Lay the case on cardboard and try not to walk around too much and stay off the carpets. Walking on carpets is the worst thing especially if you shuffle your feet. You could even wear disposable gloves. I have built many computers and am constantly working on my computer and never had a problem even though I don' wear the wrist band. I have tile and wood floors and a wood desk and a fomica top folding table.
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January 18, 2012 4:01:45 AM

autoordnance said:
Be organized. I put mine together on a 6' folding table with a piece of rubber rolled out on it. READ the literature. The book for your motherboard WILL be helpful. especially the wiring diagrams. I put my dream machine together in about an hour and it fired up perfectly on the first shot. I credited a lot of that to the several hours I spent reading everything I could about my products. My system was a $3700 obsession of mine for about 2 months though before I actually put it together.... maybe you aren't as white/nerdy as me though :D  Good luck man. Patience & Organization.... and ya.. tile or hardwood will be fine. just keep the cat away and you'll be fine.


Wow... $3800... I wish I had that budget, but alas I have only a $650 budget.

What do you mean by wiring diagrams? I don't have a cat, so that won't be a problem.
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January 18, 2012 4:04:34 AM

inzone said:
If you pay attention to the weather you will know when static electricity is at it's worst. Low humidity and dry air add to static electricity and you should take extra precautions when that is the conditions. If it is humid and not so humid then you will have a better chance of little or no static electricity. When walking into a room touch the wall switch especially near the screws amnd you will hear a discharge of static. Wood or tile floors are best for working on and the table or counter should be the same plus plastic or formica tops. Lay the case on card board and try not to walk around too much and stay off the carpets. Walking on carpets is the worst thing especially if you shuffle your feet. You could even wear disposable gloves. I have built many computers and am constantly working on my computer and never had a problem even though I don' wear the wrist band. I have tile and wood floors and a wood desk and a fomica top folding table.


I have a plastic cover on the dining table. Will that work?

Plus I live in Nevada.. it's always low humidity and dry air ( :fou:  ). Disposable gloves? Not latex though right? The plastic-y food prep ones?
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January 18, 2012 4:04:40 AM

I have the same questions as I am going to be order a mobo/CPU/GPU/PSU/RAM and going to be fitting it into a new case and placing my HDD over to it.

There are safety pre-cautions to this even if the rig itself is not plugged in?
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January 18, 2012 4:05:59 AM

the diagrams/charts in the motherboard booklet will tell you which little prongs are which... youll need to locate several.. power button on the case, reset button on the case, fans, fan controls if you have them, usb on the case... etc.. all are labeled in small little abbreviations on the board but the book will help you decipher that info..
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January 18, 2012 4:08:06 AM

kevinlong said:
I have the same questions as I am going to be order a mobo/CPU/GPU/PSU/RAM and going to be fitting it into a new case and placing my HDD over to it.

There are safety pre-cautions to this even if the rig itself is not plugged in?


So far, the collection of tips are:
- Don't work on carpet or even think about walking on carpet for any reason
- Touch the case with one hand to discharge
- No cats
- Disposable gloves
- Rubber / Plastic cover on the worktable
- NOT low humidity / dry air (recommended)
- Wood / Tile floors
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January 18, 2012 4:08:36 AM

autoordnance said:
the diagrams/charts in the motherboard booklet will tell you which little prongs are which... youll need to locate several.. power button on the case, reset button on the case, fans, fan controls if you have them, usb on the case... etc.. all are labeled in small little abbreviations on the board but the book will help you decipher that info..


Understood.
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January 18, 2012 4:13:14 AM

Cybernetic said:
I have a plastic cover on the dining table. Will that work?

Plus I live in Nevada.. it's always low humidity and dry air ( :fou:  ). Disposable gloves? Not latex though right? The plastic-y food prep ones?



Anything that doesn't conduct electricity is good to use so yes the plastic cover will work and you can use the food prep ones , they are thin enough so you can feel the parts and work with the screws and things.

Nevada!! of all places , talk about low humidity and dry air. You will have to be extra careful and pay attention to what you wear and if you hear anything when you put your clothes on sometimes you can hear the static being discharged when you put a shirt on.

Good luck.
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January 18, 2012 4:14:37 AM

and just for the record.. I call BS on the whole "any small static shock could fry your whole system" theory... but thats just me. I get it that the parts are sensitive and that you ought to be careful with them.. but come on. youre telling me that if i rub my hair and the forget to ground myself before i grab my 6990 that the tiny static charge is going to roach my $800 GPU... doubt it. but ofc I'm not going to push my luck either! better safe than sorry I suppose, but its still bs. /rant
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January 18, 2012 4:22:35 AM

autoordnance said:
and just for the record.. I call BS on the whole "any small static shock could fry your whole system" theory... but thats just me. I get it that the parts are sensitive and that you ought to be careful with them.. but come on. youre telling me that if i rub my hair and the forget to ground myself before i grab my 6990 that the tiny static charge is going to roach my $800 GPU... doubt it. but ofc I'm not going to push my luck either! better safe than sorry I suppose, but its still bs. /rant


Like you said--Better safe than sorry. The whole thing does seem a bit silly though. Hmm...
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January 18, 2012 4:38:10 AM

Best answer selected by Cybernetic.
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January 18, 2012 4:38:46 AM

inzone said:
If you pay attention to the weather you will know when static electricity is at it's worst. Low humidity and dry air add to static electricity and you should take extra precautions when that is the conditions. If it is humid and not so humid then you will have a better chance of little or no static electricity. When walking into a room touch the wall switch especially near the screws and you will hear a discharge of static. Wood or tile floors are best for working on and the table or counter should be the same plus plastic or formica tops. Lay the case on cardboard and try not to walk around too much and stay off the carpets. Walking on carpets is the worst thing especially if you shuffle your feet. You could even wear disposable gloves. I have built many computers and am constantly working on my computer and never had a problem even though I don' wear the wrist band. I have tile and wood floors and a wood desk and a fomica top folding table.


Thanks for the help. Props to Auto as well for his/her input.
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